Author Archives: CIDS

World Experts Lecture Series

The Strategic Studies Program (SSP) of the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS), in partnership with the UP Office of International Linkages (UP OIL), will hold the World Experts Lecture Series on 23 October 2018 (Tuesday), from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., at the Audiovisual Room of the UP Marine Science Institute, UP Diliman, Quezon City.

The public lecture, which seeks to provide insights on the developing geopolitical situation in the Indo-Pacific, will have Dr. Brendan Taylor (Associate Professor of Strategic Studies) and Dr. William Tow (Professor of International Relations), both from the ANU Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, as its speakers.

This event is free and open to the public. To pre-register visit https://goo.gl/forms/fTmqVLHXzuAt66bv1.

For more information, please contact [email protected] or (02) 981-8500 loc. 4266 to 68.

APP Conference on Development and Security Crossroads for the Philippines and Asia

The Asian Politics & Policy Journal (APP), the UP Department of Political Science, and the UP CIDS Strategic Studies Program (SSP) invite you to the APP Conference on Development and Security Crossroads for the Philippines and Asia, happening on 22 October 2018, 8:30 AM to 5:15 PM, at the UP CIDS Conference Hall, Ang Bahay ng Alumni, UP Diliman, Quezon City.

Pre-register at bit.ly/appconference2018. For inquiries, email [email protected] or call 981-8500 loc. 3586.

Ensuring a Square Meal: Women and Food Security in Southeast Asia

The UP CIDS Program on Social and Political Change, together with World Scientific Singapore and the UP Department of Political Science, is co-organizing the launch of and a panel discussion on the book “Ensuring a Square Meal: Women and Food Security in Southeast Asia” on October 19, 2018 (Friday), 2:00 to 4:00 PM, at the UP CIDS Conference Hall. The panel discussants include Dr. Theresa Devasahayam (Singapore University of Social Sciences), editor of the book, and Dr. Jorge Tigno (University of the Philippines Diliman) and Dr. Thelma Paris (University of the Philippines Los Baños), authors of the book’s two chapters.

To register, please contact Ms. Jesam Jimenez at [email protected] or (02) 981-8500 locs. 4266 and 4267. Deadline for registration is on October 17, 2018 (Wednesday).

The Book

Research on women and food security in Southeast Asia has been limited. The collection of chapters in “Ensuring a Square Meal: Women and Food Security in Southeast Asia” is one of the first attempts at providing a lens into the linkages between women and food security at the household, community, national, and transnational levels. More broadly, the chapters examine women’s contribution in households, resource distribution to produce food, and the purchasing power to buy food. In analysing the various facets of food security in relation to gender, the analyses focus on the meanings of ‘private’ and ‘public’, and the extent to which the effects of the two spheres spill over into each other. Given women’s critical role in food production and provision, the book assesses the structural forces enabling women to access productive resources and, in turn, ensure sustainable strategies for food security; as well as it evaluates how governments might address the constraints women face in this vital role.

For more information on the book, please visit https://doi.org./10.1142/10761.

Capitalism and Inclusion Under Weak Institutions: Book Launch and Panel Discussion

The UP CIDS Program on Escaping the Middle-Income Trap: Chains for Change (EMIT:C4C) and the UP School of Economics invite you to the book launch of and panel discussion on Dr. Raul V. Fabella’s “Capitalism and Inclusion Under Weak Institutions” on October 12, 2018 (Friday), 4:30 PM, at the UP School of Economics, UP Diliman, Quezon City.

For inquiries and confirmation of attendance, email [email protected].

Strategic Outlook 2018–2019: Proceedings from the 3rd Katipunan Conference

“Strategic Outlook 2018–2019” contains the proceedings from the 3rd Katipunan Conference: The Philippine Strategic Outlook 2018-2019, held last February 2018 and organized by the UP CIDS Strategic Studies Program (UP CIDS–SSP) and the UP Institute for Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea (UP IMLOS).

Read the publication below or click here to download.

Change and Continuity in China’s Foreign Policy

The Strategic Studies Program (SSP) of the University of the Philippines’ Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS), in partnership with the UP Diliman Department of Political Science, will hold a lecture entitled “Change and Continuity in China’s Foreign Policy” on Wednesday, 10 October 2018 from 1:30 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. at the UP CIDS Conference Hall, Lower Ground Floor, Ang Bahay ng Alumni, Diliman, Quezon City. The event will present the findings of the studies conducted by SSP Research Fellows, Dr. Meiting Li and Raisa E. Lumampao, on the emerging trends in China’s foreign policy and its implications for Korea.
The lecture is free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. To pre-register, please visit:https://bit.ly/2NeOVMR.
About the Speakers 
  • Meiting Li is currently Assistant Professor of International Relations at the Department of Political Science, University of the Philippines Diliman. She previously worked in the School of International Relations at Xiamen University (China) for three years. She obtained her Ph.D. in Politics from University of Exeter (UK) in 2012. Her research interests include foreign policy analysis, China studies, and non-traditional security studies.
  • Raisa Lumampao is currently Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science, University of the Philippines Diliman. She completed her master’s degree in Global Affairs and Policy from Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea in 2016 and earned her bachelor’s degree in Philosophy from the University of the Philippines. She has previously worked with the Korean Embassy in Manila and the Presidential Commission on the Visiting Forces Agreement. Her research interests include East Asian politics, Middle East politics, and foreign policy.
About the Organizers
The public lecture is organized by the Strategic Studies Program of the University of the Philippines’ Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) in partnership with the UP Diliman Department of Political Science. The UP CIDS Strategic Studies Program aims to promote interest and discourse on significant changes in Philippine foreign policy and develop capacity building for strategic studies in the country. It views the Philippines’ latest engagements with the great powers and multilateral cooperation with other states in the Asia-Pacific region as a catalyst to further collaborative and multi-disciplinary research between the intellectual communities within East Asia.
For more information, please contact [email protected] or (02) 981 8500 loc. 4266-68.

Who Serves the Poor in Philippine Higher Education?

The Program on Higher Education Research and Policy Reform (HERPR) of the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) will hold a forum entitled “Who Serves the Poor in Philippine Higher Education?” on Thursday, 4 October 2018, from 9:00 AM to 12:00 NN, at the UP CIDS Conference Hall, Lower Ground Floor, Ang Bahay ng Alumni, UP Diliman, Quezon City.

The event will feature the findings of the studies conducted by HERPR Research Fellows Mr. Karol Mark Yee and Dr. Geoffrey Ducanes on access of the poor to higher education from 1999 to 2014, particularly highlighting nuances in the profile, context, and the variety of barriers faced by students coming from the poorest households in accessing college education.

For more information, email [email protected].

Marx Bicentennial Lecture Series #9

Marxism and religion have had a rather complicated history in theory, but how are these being reconciled in more tangible terms? Explore these connections through the lectures of Edicio Dela Torre and Prof. Julkipli Wadi at the Marx Bicentennial Lecture Series No. 8, happening on 27 September 2018, 2:00 to 5:00 PM, at the UP CIDS Conference Hall.

Know more about the lecture series and register at bit.ly/marx200ph.

Conference: The Role of the State, Education, Community Outreach, Responsible Media, and Religio-Cultural Dialogues in Countering Violent Extremism (CVE)

The conference theme seeks to understand the ontologies, epistemologies, theories, studies, narratives, motivations, causes, effects, and impacts of violent extremism, including exploring approaches, frameworks, solutions, and mechanisms on how to counter it by utilizing the imperatives and significances of the state, education, sustainable community outreach programs, highly principled and responsible media, and inter/intra-faith or religio-cultural dialogues that promote religious pluralism, multiculturalism, respect for diversity, acceptance and tolerance. It is organized and sponsored by the UP CIDS Islamic Studies Program (ISP), UP Office of International Linkages (UP OIL), UP Institute of Islamic Studies (UP IIS), Philippine International Studies Organization (PHISO), and UP-IIS Graduate Students Organization.

This will be held on September 22, 2018 (Saturday), 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM, at the UP National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development (UP NISMED), UP Diliman, Quezon City. Visit https://iis.upd.edu.ph/2018/02/17/2018-conference/ or email [email protected] for more information.

Exploratory Workshop on “Islam in Southeast Asia”

The international exploratory workshop on “Islam in Southeast Asia” concentrates on publishing selected ‘peer-reviewed’ academic and policy works that focuses on theoretical, methodological, empirical, religious, spiritual, and critical studies of Islam, including mundane praxes and day-to-day realities of Muslims (and their relations to non-Muslims) in Southeast Asia. It is organized and sponsored by the UP CIDS Islamic Studies Program (ISP), UP Office of International Linkages (UP OIL), UP Institute of Islamic Studies (UP IIS), Philippine International Studies Organization (PHISO), and UP-IIS Graduate Students Organization.

The workshop will be held on September 21, 2018 (Friday), 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM, at the UP National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development (UP NISMED), UP Diliman, Quezon City. Visit https://iis.upd.edu.ph/2018/02/17/2018-conference/ or email [email protected] for more information.

New Publication: “Capitalism and Inclusion Under Weak Institutions” by Dr. Raul V. Fabella

In “Capitalism and Inclusion Under Weak Institutions,” Dr. Raul V. Fabella (National Scientist (Social Sciences) and Former Dean, UP School of Economics) tackles capitalism in Third World countries, the central problem of weak institutions, and their implications on Philippine economic development.

Copies are available at the UP CIDS Library and Resource Center for Php200. For orders and inquiries, contact Mr. Joseph Cruzado at 981-8500 (loc. 4266 to 4268) or 435-9283.

RTD: Cosmetics, Fashions, and the Exploitation of Women

Uncover the relationship of the capitalist system, the cosmetics and fashion industries, and the oppression of women in “Cosmetics, Fashions, and the Exploitation of Women,” a roundtable discussion featuring Mary-Alice Waters and Janet Roth of Pathfinder Press, happening on September 20, 2018 (Thursday), 2:00 to 5:00 PM, at the UP CIDS Conference Hall.

This event is organized by the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development (AltDev) and the Philippines-Cuba Cultural and Friendship Association (PhilCuba). For more information, email [email protected].

PSPC-organized lecture presents research on Filipino nurses in the UK

On 28 August 2018, Dr. Nicola Gillin of the Anglia Ruskin University (Cambridge) delivered a lecture based on her Ph.D. dissertation examining nursing culture and patient care between United Kingdom (UK) and European Union (EU)/overseas nurses. Dr. Gillin is currently in the country to continue her research on Filipino nurses in the UK, looking more deeply into their motivations for working in the UK and its impact on the family unit in the Philippines. In her presentation, she shared the trends of migration of Filipino nurses into the UK through time and how this is affected by the recent Brexit referendum.

The UK has had numerous instances of shortages in their nursing workforce. They began recruiting nurses overseas in the 19th century through their British colonies in Africa and in the Caribbean. In the 1960s, through the establishment of the National Health Service (NHS), the UK formed partnerships with other overseas countries including the Philippines and thus began the migration of Filipino nurses into the UK. Data shows that since the 1960s, there has been a steady and consistent number of Filipino nurses in the UK, with very few of them leaving the UK or going back to the Philippines. Filipinos are now the second most common nationality in the United Kingdom’s nursing workforce, second only to UK-born nurses. Dr. Gillin argues that this will not be affected by the Brexit vote and the UK may even open more opportunities for Filipino nurses.

Data from the UK Health Foundation shows that after the Brexit vote in June 2016, there was a sudden drop in EU nurses coming in the UK. It was presumed that the Brexit vote caused this but Dr. Gillin poses differently. Dr. Gillin explains that what might have caused this is a new policy which requires EU nurses to take a language test that will be implemented on July 2016. Aside from the Health Foundation statistics, surveys conducted in several NHS Trusts also show that after the Brexit vote, most of them ceased recruitment drives in the EU and switched to other countries such as the Philippines, India, and Dubai (in the United Arab Emirates). How much Brexit plays into the overseas recruitment drive of the nursing workforce in the UK is still inconclusive, but the response to this opens more doors to nurses outside the EU.

This lecture was co-organized with the UP Department of Political Science and with the participation of the Philippine Social Science Council and the Philippine Migration Research Network.

Filipino migrants in Italy highlighted in PSPC event

On 3 August 2018, the UP CIDS Program on Social and Political Change (PSPC) hosted a film screening and panel discussion organized by the Philippine Italian Association and in cooperation with the UP Department of Political Science and the Scalabrini Migration Center. A series of interviews with first- and second-generation Filipino migrants in Italy were presented in the event, which depicted the stories of overseas Filipino workers and their process of integration abroad.

The event commenced with a panel discussion on Filipino migrant workers in Italy joined by Dr. Marla Asis, Director of Research and Publications of the Scalabrini Migration Center, Pete Chan, former Philippine Consul General in Milan, Fr. Graziano Gavioli, an Italian priest presently stationed at Tondo, Manila, and Ellene Sana, Executive Director of the Center for Migrant Advocacy.

After the panel discussion is the screening of “Filipinos in the Eyes of an Italian,” a series of interviews of Filipino migrants in Italy presented by Francesco Conte, director of Termini TV. Conte first introduced Termini TV as an online channel featuring stories of people in train stations. The television channel explores migration as a universal phenomenon and considers train stations as a space witnessing constant mobility. He presented nine videos of Filipinos from all over Italy depicting the stories of first- and second-generation Filipino migrants in the country. The videos show the different experiences of migrants who had to reinvent their lives in a foreign land and of their children who grew up with questions about their heritage and identity.

Filipinos have been migrating to Italy since the 1970s and a majority of them work there as domestic workers. Dr. Asis notes that domestic work is “work that is necessary but not necessarily valued” by the Italian local population. Filipinos in Italy, domestic worker or otherwise, experience discrimination because of this stereotype. This is not to say that domestic work is shameful but that is often the case as this is the only opportunity given to them despite having other skills and talents to offer. Many of the Filipinos featured in the interviews are college graduates but since their degrees are not recognized by Italian institutions, they accept what is afforded to them in order to survive.

According to Dr. Asis, Filipinos in Italy will say that they are integrated with Italian culture, but some indicators suggest otherwise. They might be able to speak the language and obtain employment but some benefits and opportunities are withheld from them. They also face discrimination from the local population with the purveying notion that immigrants are dangerous, are terrorists, and will take away their jobs. Fr. Gavioli cites the interventions his parish in Modena, Italy has made for migrant communities. One of the things that they promote is not integration but rather the concept of “interculture.” Migrants are expected to integrate themselves with Italian culture and, therefore, abandon their heritage in order to be accepted. According to Fr. Gavioli, this does not result to integration but to the Italianization of migrants. In his parish, integration goes both ways and reciprocal acceptance promotes better interaction.

EMIT:C4C conducts first public conference

The Program on Escaping the Middle Income Trap: Chains for Change – Partnerships for Inclusiveness and Competitiveness (EMIT:C4C), in collaboration with the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM), conducted its first public conference, “Chains-for-Change: Emerging Lessons on Inclusive Agriculture Value Chains” last 18 July 2018 at the UP School of Economics Auditorium.

The conference gathered one hundred and thirty one (131) attendees from the academe, national government, local governments, civil society, international organizations, banking and microfinance sectors, agri-business and agri-enterprise sectors, farmers cooperatives and groups, corporations, and corporate foundations, which are all stakeholders in agriculture value chain research, financing, and practice playing vital roles in bridging smallholders to the formal market.

Key themes and findings drawn from EMIT:C4C’s first loop of action research projects conducted in 2017 were presented at the forum. This first set of action research focused on case studies of three value chains, namely Jollibee Group Foundation (JGF)’s Farmer Entrepreneurship Program in Nueva Ecija and Cebu; PinoyME Foundation and Caritas Diocese of Libmanan’s Saradit na Kristiyanong Komunidad Rice Processing Center in Camarines Sur; and Unifrutti Tropical Philippines and Hineleban Foundation’s transformational and peace-centric model in Bukidnon, Davao, and Maguindanao.

UP System Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Ma. Cynthia Rose Banzon-Bautista delivered the welcome remarks and provided an overview of the EMIT:C4C Program, which was followed by sessions featuring discussions highlighting the role of partnerships, governance structures, local intermediaries, and smallholders in inclusive value chains and agricultural financing.

From the sessions and discussions, ways forward and emerging agenda were tackled. Ms. Grace Tan Caktiong, JGF President, discussed the agenda for inclusive business, while UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Executive Director Dr. Teresa Encarnacion Tadem talked about next steps in the realm of research and raised points for reflection for the researchers. Assistant Secretary Felicitas Agoncillo-Reyes of the Department of Trade and Industry’s Board of Investments shed light on the developments and agenda for the government, particularly in the area of inclusive business. Her Excellency Marion Derckx, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the Philippines, discussed arising strategies in the field of cross-sector partnerships in inclusive value chain and business development to benefit marginalized sectors, such as agricultural smallholders.

Dr. Rob van Tulder of the Rotterdam School of Management also launched a special edition of his book, “Business and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),” at the forum. The book provides a framework for businesses to become inclusive and grounded on the United Nations’ SDGs and encourages engagement in meaningful and synergistic partnerships geared towards the common goal of inclusivity and sustainability.

Another highlight of the public conference was the inauguration of the EMIT:C4C Partnerships Center for Inclusiveness and Competitiveness as “a safe partnering space” for inclusive value chain development within the confines of academe. The UP CIDS, the home of EMIT:C4C Program in the Philippines, and the Rotterdam School of Management of Erasmus University, which extends its expertise on inclusive business, business and society, and value chains, along with partners from the public and private sector, were acknowledged.

The Program on Escaping the Middle-Income Trap: Chains for Change – Partnerships for Inclusiveness and Competitiveness (EMIT:C4C) of UP CIDS aims to develop action research cases on frontrunner companies and civil society organizations (CSOs) engaged in agriculture value chains. Its primary interest is to scrutinize and understand the key elements that would enable inclusive and sustainable partnerships in Philippine agricultural value chains in order to effectively involve and benefit smallholders, indigenous peoples, and other rural poor populations. The program intends to build collaborative learning and cross-sectoral partnerships for inclusive and sustainable agriculture value chains among corporations, CSOs, government agencies, the academe, and farmer groups.

(Event write-up by Camia Tangco, Junior Research Associate, Program on Escaping the Middle-Income Trap: Chains for Change; Photos courtesy of Jollibee Group Foundation and Lean Velasquez)

Fifth [email protected] lecture centers on political economy and ‘bayanihan socialism’

On 12 July 2018, the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Alternative Development, in partnership with the Socialist Circle, organized the fifth installment of the Marx Bicentennial Lecture Series held at the UP CIDS Conference Hall.

For this installment, Prof. Amado M. Mendoza, Jr., Ph.D., Professor at the Department of Political Science, University of the Philippines Diliman, and Cesar “Ka Sonny” Melencio, Chair of the Partido Lakas ng Masa (PLM), delivered lectures on political economy and ‘bayanihan socialism,’ respectively. Prof. Eduardo C. Tadem, Ph.D., Convenor of the Program on Alternative Development and retired Professor of Asian Studies, welcomed the participants, while Asst. Prof. Venarica B. Papa of the College of Social Work and Community Development (CSWCD) served as the moderator of the lecture.

Prof. Mendoza presented a paper entitled “Capitalist Restoration in the Soviet Union: Revisiting an Erroneous Thesis.” He argued that the thesis posed by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) that the Soviet Union’s political economy is capitalist (restored) may not be entirely correct. To discuss his arguments, he used Marxist theories to highlight the differences between a socialist and a capitalist economy and then used these points to counter the CCP—and to some extent, the CPP—on the thesis regarding the restoration of the capitalist political economy in the Soviet Union.

Mr. Sonny Melencio then delivered his presentation entitled “Forward, Bayanihan Socialism.” In his presentation, Mr. Melencio has argued for the local adaptation of socialism based on the cultural norms of localities. He pointed out that in the Philippines, the spirit of ‘bayanihan’ is very much alive even before the Philippines was colonized by foreign powers. And by juxtaposing ‘bayanihan’ to the idea of socialism, ‘Bayanihan Socialism’ aims to make socialism more palatable to Philippine society.

After the presentation of the speakers, an open forum was held where the members of the audience were able to ask questions and share their insights about the topics presented. To formally conclude the lecture, Asst. Prof. Papa gave a summary of the discussion.

The Marx Bicentennial Lecture Series is a year-long event that aims to commemorate the enduring global influence, impact, and relevance of the works of the well-known German philosopher Karl Marx on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of his birth.

Critical analysis of film and literature featured in 4th Marx bicentennial lecture

On 28 June 2018, the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Alternative Development (AltDev), in partnership with the Socialist Circle, organized the fourth segment of the Marx Bicentennial Lecture Series held at the UP CIDS Conference Hall. UP Film Institute Professor Rolando Tolentino, Ph.D., former Dean of the UP College of Mass Communication, and Maria Ima Carmela Ariate, a graduate student of the UP Asian Center, delivered the lectures for this installment.

Professor Eduardo C. Tadem, Ph.D., Convenor of the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development gave the opening remarks and Assistant Professor Marivic Raquiza, Ph.D. of the National College of Public Administration and Governance (NCPAG) served as the moderator of the lecture. The lecture was attended by participants from different social groups and organizations.

Prof. Tolentino presented a paper entitled “Marx, Philippine Cinema, Indie and Documentary Films: For and Against Commodity Fetishism” for the event’s first lecture. He tackled the discourse of commodity fetishism in Philippine films, emphasizing the differences in how social and economic realities are reflected and presented in mainstream and independent cinema.

Meanwhile, Ms. Ariate presented her paper “Panitikan Bilang Armas ng Pandigma (Literature as a Weapon of War): A Survey of Philippine Proletarian Literature (2000-2010).” The paper primarily argues for the recognition of proletarian literature as a distinct category of literary expression through the various writings of the revolutionary movement in the Philippines. She mentioned how Marxism encourages the analysis of literature by juxtaposing it with its historical development and pointed out how radicalization in the 1970s shaped proletarian literature in the country.

An open forum was held after the two presentations and Asst. Prof. Raquiza summarized the discussion to formally conclude the event.

The Marx Bicentennial Lecture Series is a year-long event that aims to commemorate the enduring global influence, impact, and relevance of the works of the well-known German philosopher Karl Marx on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of his birth.

PSPC and UP PolSci co-organizes lecture on constitutional democracy

On 29 June 2018, the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Social and Political Change (PSPC), together with the UP Department of Political Science, co-hosted “How to Lose and Save a Constitutional Democracy,” a public lecture by Professor Tom Ginsburg, Leo Spitz Professor of International Law of the University of Chicago Law School. In this lecture, Prof. Ginsburg talks about his upcoming book, “How to Save a Constitutional Democracy,” which he co-wrote with Prof. Aziz Huq.

Aside from the public lecture, Prof. Ginsburg is in the country to serve as Senior Advisor to the Constitution Building Programme of the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA). While in the Philippines, he visited the House of Representatives to discuss matters of constitution building and constitution development. He also joined the Constitutional Assessment of the 1987 Philippines Constitution Project, a joint undertaking led by International IDEA, the UP CIDS PSPC, and the UP Department of Political Science which aims to see how the Constitution has performed and achieved its objectives and to contribute to the process of charter change in the Philippines.

Prof. Ginsburg argues in his work that the weakening of democracy will not happen through a collapse, but more likely through a gradual erosion from inside. The agents that cause the erosion of democracy are either charismatic populists (i.e., a savior figure who will unify the people) and partisan degradation (where political parties use undemocratic means to stay in power). Furthermore, many of the tools of democratic erosion are actually legal, such as constitutional amendments, bypassing institutional checks, undermining the rule of law, eliminating electoral competition, and limiting freedom of speech and association.

Prof. Ginsburg also offers solutions that may save constitutional democracy. He primarily used the United States Constitution as an example in examining the weaknesses of the constitution and offering constitutional design ideas that prevent the erosion of democracy. However, he explains that the experience of the US is not so far detached to that of other countries.

According to him, constitutionalism must abstract power away from the person, but recent events in politics show world leaders attacking the media, undermining the rule of law, attacking individual judges, and abusing prosecutorial processes. At the same time, Prof. Ginsburg notes that we can also see that people are being awakened by this state of affairs and are motivated to see genuine change. A major political force may emerge as a backlash from the erosion of democracy and provides optimism in saving constitutional democracies.

PSPC and UP PolSci host lecture by Professor Dan Slater

On 27 June 27 2018, the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Social and Political Change (PSPC) and the UP Department of Political Science hosted a lecture by Professor Dan Slater, Director of the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies of the University of Michigan.

Professor Slater’s lecture, “Voting Against Democracy: Theory and Variation in the Philippines and Beyond,” gave students and faculty some insights on a research project he is currently working on with Professors Alexandra Filindra and Petia Kostadinova of the University of Illinois at Chicago. This project looks into the question and variation of popular support in democracies for leaders who lack democratic credentials or engage in undemocratic practices.

Taking off from his earlier work “Ordering Power: Contentious Politics and Authoritarian Leviathans in Southeast Asia” (Cambridge University Press, 2010), Professor Slater argues that the role of public support is vital to the durability of authoritarian regimes and in this project, he and his colleagues will investigate what leads people to support nondemocratic behavior and practices. With the challenges that democracies face today, using the dynamic between threats and gains as motivations for supporting nondemocratic regimes may give us an insight on the world’s current situation.

The research project will look into six country cases and Professor Slater’s focus will be on the Philippines and India. These countries were selected for their substantial democratic history paired with a substantial support for nondemocratic leaders and parties.

Taiwan’s New Southbound Policy: Implications for the Philippines

The Strategic Studies Program (SSP) of the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) aims to promote interest and discourse on significant changes in Philippine foreign policy, and develop capacity building for strategic studies in the country. The program views the Philippines’ latest engagements with the great powers and multilateral cooperation with other states in the Asia-Pacific region as a catalyst to further collaborative and multi-disciplinary research between the intellectual communities within East Asia.

In light of these objectives, we would like to extend our warm invitation to a public lecture, “Taiwan’s New Southbound Policy: Implications for the Philippines,” on 13 July 2018, 9:00 am to 12:00 nn at the Seminar Room, Hall of Wisdom of the Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City. This public lecture aims to provide insights on the significance of Taiwan’s New Southbound Policy for the Philippines and the Indo-Pacific region in general. Experts from the United States, Taiwan, and the Philippines will discuss issues related to this national policy. The invited speakers include scholars from the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, D.C., and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies of the National Chengchi University, Taiwan. Members of the academe, government and military representatives, and foreign delegates are also expected to attend this event.

The public lecture is free and is sponsored by the UP CIDS Strategic Studies Program, in collaboration with the UP Department of Political Science, Asia Pacific Pathways to Progress Foundation, Inc. (APPFI), and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).

Interested participants may register at https://goo.gl/forms/AZ4tCC9l4nv7rKqa2. The online registration closes on 12 July 2018, Thursday at 5:00 pm.

For concerns and inquiries, you may email [email protected] or contact 981–8500 loc. 4266/4267/4268.

Marxist movements and radical criticism of PH romcoms tackled in 3rd Marx bicentennial lecture

On 14 June 2018, the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Alternative Development (AltDev), in partnership with The Socialist Circle, organized the third lecture in the Marx Bicentennial Lecture Series held at the UP CIDS Conference Hall. Prof. Armando “Badi” Malay, Jr., Ph.D., former Dean and retired Professor of the UP Asian Center (UP AC), and Mr. Janus Nolasco, Managing Editor of Asian Studies: Critical Perspectives on Asia delivered the lectures for this installment.

To formally open the event, Prof. Eduardo C. Tadem, Ph.D., Convenor of the Program on Alternative Development and retired Professor of Asian Studies, welcomed the participants and gave the opening remarks. Prof. Maria Dulce F. Natividad, Ph.D. of the UP Asian Center served as the moderator of the lecture-forum.

Dr. Malay presented a paper entitled “1968 Revisited: Paris/Prague/Vietnam/Philippines,” which features his assessment on the different Marxist movements in Paris, Prague, Vietnam, and the Philippines. Citing Czech philosopher Ivan Svitak, Dr. Malay drew a comparison on the development of Marxism in Europe and in Asia.

Mr. Nolasco discussed his paper entitled “The Blindspots of Radical Criticism: Alternative Readings of Filipino Popular Culture.” Using a complementary approach, he argued that some forms of Filipino popular culture, particularly Philippine romantic comedy films, can also serve as a medium in critically engaging the people.

After the lecture, an open forum was held where members of the audience were able to ask questions and gain further insights from the speakers. To formally conclude the event, Prof. Natividad summarized the discussion and thanked the audience for their participation in the lecture.

The Marx Bicentennial Lecture Series is a year-long event that aims to commemorate the enduring global influence, impact, and relevance of the works of the well-known German philosopher Karl Marx on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of his birth.

(Write-up by Nathaniel Candelaria of the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development)

[Announcement] International Seminar-Workshop on Madrasah Education

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Islamic Studies Program (ISP), the UP Institute of Islamic Studies (UP IIS), and the Office of the Education Attaché, Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia in Manila will organize an International Seminar-Workshop on Madrasah Education with the theme, “Exploring Best Practices in Madaris and Islamic Studies Education between Indonesia and the Philippines,” on July 4 and 5, 2018 at Balay Kalinaw, University of the Philippines Diliman.

For more information, visit bit.ly/2Kdy37W or email i[email protected].

PSPC co-organizes lectures on refugees and immigrants in the US

 

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Social and Political Change (PSPC), together with the UP Department of Political Science, co-organized back-to-back public lectures discussing the condition of refugees and immigrants in the United States (US) last 7 June 2018 at Palma Hall, UP Diliman.

The first lecture was given by Dr. Claire Angelique Nolasco, an Associate Professor of Criminology at the Texas A&M University in San Antonio, Texas, entitled “Suffer the Little Children to Come: Legal Rights of Unaccompanied Alien Children Under United States Federal Court Jurisprudence.” Dr. Nolasco’s lecture looked into the legal rights granted to unaccompanied alien children (UAC) who enter the United States as interpreted and expanded by the federal court throughout the years.

Dr. Nolasco’s lecture was followed by an open forum with students and faculty of the UP Department of Political Science. Questions and concerns were raised regarding the exploitation of the vulnerability of the UAC and the violation of their rights, especially under the Trump administration. Indeed, there are instances where the rights of these children were violated by US immigration agencies and officers which may have been the result of the ambiguity of the law or xenophobic and racist tendencies of immigration officers.

The second lecture was delivered by Dr. Daniel Braaten who is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Texas Lutheran University. The title of his lecture was “You Don’t Have to Live Like a Refugee: The Politics of Refugee Resettlement in the United States,” which investigates patterns of refugee resettlement in the United States. In his study, Dr. Braaten found that a state’s political culture had a strong impact on the number of refugees that resettles there. It is interesting to note that, in his findings, the more conservative a state is, the more open they are to refugees. The economic variables of a state (wages, employment opportunities, housing, quality of life, and poverty rate) were also statistically significant in predicting the openness of a state to refugees.

As the world faces a global refugee crisis and political debates over levels of immigration and immigration policy take place, especially in today’s global political climate, it is important to have discussions on this issue. These individuals flee their home countries due to political unrest, extreme violence or poverty, or persecution, and it is imperative that they are afforded with due process of the law and basic human rights.

UP CIDS welcomes new interns

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) welcomed four student interns who will work in two of the policy research programs supported by the Center.

UP Manila Political Science students Alexa Gandia, Frances Mabuti, and Chernae Sastrillas will work with the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development (UPAD) on its ongoing research and public activities. The three interns will help in UPAD’s current research on alternative development practices and will provide technical assistance in the Program’s upcoming lectures, workshops, and fora. The interns will also have the chance to join the Program’s fieldwork in one of its research sites.

The UP CIDS Program on Higher Education Research and Policy Reform also welcomed its graduate intern, Jose Luis Bacigalupo Vargas, who is currently completing his degree in Master in Public Administration in International Development (MPA/ID) at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. He also holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics from Universidad del Pacifico in Peru. Prior to joining the UP CIDS Program on Higher Education Research and Policy Reform, he worked for and with the Ministry of Education in Peru as Advisor to the Minister’s Cabinet, and as a junior associate in the World Bank.

(With contributions from Nathaniel Candelaria of the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development and Shaira Tengco of the UP CIDS Program on Higher Education Research and Policy Reform)

AltDev co-hosts colloquium on post-Brexit Britain

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Alternative Development (AltDev), Focus on the Global South, and Asia Europe People’s Forum (AEPF) hosted the public colloquium “Beyond Brexit: Britain in the Age of Far Right Populism and Global Inequality,” held last 31 May 2018 at the UP CIDS Conference Hall. Kolya Abramsky, a freelance author and editor of volumes on European and international issues, and Dorothy Guerrero, Head of Policy and Advocacy of United Kingdom (UK)-based campaign organization Global Justice Now, served as speakers for the event.

Britain voted to leave the European Union (EU) in 2016, a decision that surprised many and that has complex consequences which are yet to unfold. Some interpreted it as the revolt of the have-nots against neoliberal globalization, while others see rising xenophobia and perceived threats of immigration as the main concerns that swung the vote. Progressive and left-wing groups in Britain have varying positions about the EU—some campaigned for a Left Exit (Lexit) and some campaigned for the UK to remain within the EU. The British Left’s efforts during the referendum to expose corporate agenda as a roadblock to radical fiscal and environmental reforms in the did not lead to a deeper understanding of the UK’s role as co-architect of the current EU which favors the interests of the few and not of the many.

However, the rise of Jeremy Corbyn and his transformation from an idealist to a statesman is bringing hope towards a more compassionate Britain. What are the prospects for a “hard-Left Labour” to be the next government in Britain? Will it be able to put the “ferocious beast of free-market capitalism on a leash” before it devours all around it? Can the British Left defeat racism and put an end to the prevailing hostile environment for immigrants? What would a post-Brexit UK trade relations, especially with developing countries, look like, and how can we build a broader global solidarity for just trade and corporate accountability?

Historical context: The EU Referendum. In the early 2000s, there has been a strong critique on the EU, mainly coming from left-wing groups who are partially against some political modes and process within the union. The coming together of the countries under the EU was only made possible due to post-World War II integration, the consolidation of East and West Europe, the existence of peace, and the absence of political and economic crises. In 2015, both Corbyn and the EU referendum have been taking off, and the balance of power in Britain was already tipped to the far right. But due to breakout of the financial crisis, the political landscape had changed and led some parts of the internationalist Left and the ultranationalist Right to come together and support Brexit.

How did the Left respond to the EU integration processes? After the Second World War, there’s a very strong movement of the working class in Western and Eastern Europe. The post-WWII landscape changed as social revolutions began to thrive. Important sections of the Left responded to the global crisis of Stalinism, and the emergence and prominence of the Soviet Union.

The inter-generational gap. In terms of movement memory, the fate of memories and discourses of the Left during the 1970s in the UK is what is exactly happening in the Philippines. It becomes apparent in both the UK and the Philippines that the gap within the intergenerational links in the movement contributed to the weakening of social movements. In the Philippines, there is rich discourse on what the Philippine economy is (i.e., feudal, colonial), but discussion on its character is glaringly missing.

Impacts of industrialization and neoliberalism. In the UK, the neoliberal strategies of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher enabled a turn away from social development. As we try to explain Brexit, we see the trend of the British working class seeing migrants as competitors, without exacting accountability from the government for the unavailability of jobs. While other countries in Europe (such as Germany) continued to invest in production, build new technologies, and prioritize the sustainability and development of the labor force, the UK opted for finance instead of putting emphasis on production. Today, UK’s manufacturing declined to being only 8% of the country’s GDP, and the impact of the 2008 financial crisis to its working class was greater compared to other countries where manufacturing flourished.

Weakening of social movements. For the Left, the weakening of social movements was due to decline of spaces for campaigns outside the party system because of national policies. It is now almost impossible to organize huge protests, as compared to the situation in the 1960s or 1970s where left-wing groups, parties, and organizations flourished. There exists a question on how to introduce systemic change in the face of the Labour Party’s policies. Given this scenario, it is easier to engage and influence policies coming from the Labour Party towards initiating reforms. Hence, the outcome, in terms of trade strategy and migration issues for example, is that the British public has become more overtly racist and xenophobic, evident in increasing incidents of reported racist attacks in the country. As another example, trade relations between the UK and the United States (US) could be affected by US President Donald Trump’s desire to privatize the health care system in the UK, and similarly, there are proposed policies to charge migrants for health services.

Far-right populism and ultranationalism as a by-product of globalization. The rise of far-right populism and ultranationalism in the UK is borne out of the perception of both external and internal threats, embodied by trade interests (especially EU interests) and migrant worker competition, respectively. Furthermore, there is also a myth that the people of the UK is being victimized and that they must “take their control back,” which, in turn, is being espoused by conservatives and the new nationalists.

The Brexit lesson and prospects for progressive groups. With the current government and political situation, the shaping of the new UK after Brexit by progressive groups can be difficult. Relations between the United Kingdom and the Philippines remain cordial, as the two countries have signified renewed commitment and shared values.

The combination of Brexit and a Corbin-led government. There are various studies on the impact of Brexit on agriculture, a labor-intensive sector reliant on migrant workers. It is also interesting to look not on the condition of labor in Britain, but on how it responded to the labor conditions under EU, and on how labor unions from the energy and railway sectors fare after supporting Brexit.

(Written report courtesy of Raphael Baladad, Focus on the Global South–Philippine Office; photos courtesy of Fe Manapat, WomanHealth Philippines)

AltDev co-organizes forum on privatization of health

A public forum discussing the creeping privatization of public health was conducted at the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) last May 30, 2018. The event, entitled “Creeping Privatization of Health: Defending Public Health! – A Public Forum on Privatization versus Public Health,” was organized by Alternative Budget Initiative – Health Cluster, Social Watch Philippines, DIGNIDAD, Freedom from Debt Coalition, Focus on the Global South, Institute for Popular Democracy, Trade Justice Pilipinas, and WomanHealth Philippines, in cooperation with the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development.

The forum aims to share information on the private sector’s initiatives to expand and intervene in the health sector, to discuss and understand the implications this would have on the public health system, and to explore what can be done to defend and strengthen the public health system.

Ms. Ana Maria Nemenzo of WomanHealth Philippines gave a briefer on House Bill 7347 or the Anti-Privatization of Public Health Facilities Bill, which seeks to defend public health from privatization.

It was then followed by a discussion regarding the event’s main theme. Among the speakers in the forum were Mr. CJ Castillo of Labor Education and Research Network (LEARN) and Ms. Mary Ann Manahan of World March of Women (WMW), who shared the result of their baseline study on private hospitals. Mr. Castillo discussed the hospital industry profile in the Philippines, while Ms. Manahan presented a case study on Metro Pacific Investments Corporation (MPIC) and its competitors and their efforts in privatizing health services.

A panel of reactors were also invited to further speak about the topic. All three reactors, namely Dr. Rene Ofreneo of the School of Labor and Industrial Relations (SOLAIR) at UP Diliman, Ms. Corazon Rio of Kilos Maralita, and Ms. Rosita Lacson of Pinagsamang Lakas at Karunungan ng Nakakatanda (PILKAN), agreed that the privatization of the health industry in the Philippines will not answer the need of the people in terms of adequate and efficient access to health services. Rather, it would further push ordinary people on the periphery of access, due to high cost of services sought for the betterment of their health. All three of them pointed out the need to be critical on this sweeping privatization of health and to act in order to stop it.

An open forum was also conducted which brought up inquiries from the participants on the implications of privatization of health on youth, access to basic services, universal and primary health care, and in the health policy system.

Ms. Zeena Manglinong of the Freedom from Debt Coalition (FDC) synthesized the forum. She cited that a continuous spreading of awareness on the importance of defending public health services shall be done hand in hand with strategizing in the creation of a resistance movement against the creeping privatization of health.

(All photos courtesy of Fe Manapat, WomanHealth Philippines)

[Announcement] Creeping Privatization of Health: Defending Public Health

We are inviting you to attend the forum “Creeping Privatization of Health: Defending Public Health!,” happening on 30 May 2018 (Wednesday), 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM at the UP CIDS Conference Hall, UP Diliman.

This forum is organized by ABI-Health Cluster, Social Watch Philippines, DIGNIDAD, Freedom from Debt Coalition, Focus on the Global South, Institute for Popular Democracy, Trade Justice Pilipinas, WomanHealth Philippines, and in cooperation with the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development.

Please confirm your attendance thru Ms. Sarryna Gesite at 0906 759 2591 or via email at [email protected].

Former UP President Edgardo J. Angara, 1934–2018

May 16, 2018

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) extends its deepest sympathies and condolences to the family of former UP President Edgardo J. Angara on his passing. The UP CIDS was established as the policy research unit of the University of the Philippines System in 1985 during the term of Dr. Angara as UP President. In 1997, Dr. Angara supported the launching of the UP CIDS Public Policy Journal as an “authoritative journal for public policy guidelines in the Philippines.” The UP CIDS is also currently managing the UP President Edgardo J. Angara (UPPEJA) Fellowship Award which was founded by the UP Board of Regents in 1998. Initiated with funding from Dr. Angara, the Fellowship Award aims to promote high-level policy discussions and research on a wide range of topics that address national development goals and imperatives.

On Islamic Populism in Indonesia and the Middle East

In a novel approach to the field of Islamic politics, Vedi R. Hadiz compares the evolution of Islamic populism in Indonesia, the country with the largest Muslim population in the world, to the Middle East. Utilizing approaches from historical sociology and political economy, the paper argues that competing strands of Islamic politics can be understood as the product of contemporary struggles over power, material resources and the result of conflict across a variety of social and historical contexts.

Read the discussion paper below or click here to download.

Marx @ 200: UP CIDS launched ‘Marx Bicentennial’ Lecture Series to honour Karl Marx

Starting this May 2018, the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS), through its Program on Alternative Development (AltDev), invites the public to the ‘Marx Bicentennial Project,’ a year-long lecture series that will commemorate the enduring global influence, impact, and relevance of the works of the well-known German philosopher Karl Marx.

This year marks the 200th birth anniversary of Marx who was born on May 5, 1818, or exactly 200 years ago. This UP CIDS commemorative event will feature at least 40 lectures from academics, social movement activists and civil society about Marx and his theory and practice. Marx as an economist, historian, political theorist, sociologist, journalist, and a poet, particularly has a huge influence on Philippine politics, culture, economy, literature, and society.

To kick off the UP CIDS year-long lecture series, economist Emmanuel de Dios provided a professorial lecture on “What the New Institutional Economics Owes to Marx”, on May 4, 2018, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM at the UP School of Economics.

On May 5, the actual birthdate of Marx, UP CIDS held an afternoon lecture-forum and cultural performances at the CIDS Meeting Hall in Diliman, Quezon City with keynote lectures by UP professors Roland Simbulan and Herbert Docena.

The lecture series aimed to: interrogate the diverse intellectual, political, and historical legacies of Marx and Marxism; revisit Marxist theory and practice in light of changing social, political, and economic contexts, such as technological development, the rise of social media, and the erosion of democracy across countries; assess the complex relationship of Marxism with other intellectual currents and disciplines, from gender, science, and biopolitics to literature, historiography, and political practice; determine how and to what extent Marxist theory and practice can inform, impede, and enrich questions of political and economic praxis.

The fora in the year-long lecture series will cover the following themes: Economy: Mode of Production; Marx’s Writings; Critical Theory; Art, Popular Culture and Social Media; Marx and the Working Class; State and Nation; Marxist influence on revolutionary movements; Marx and Gender; Civil, Social and Political Human Rights.

This bicentennial tribute is being coordinated by Eduardo Climaco Tadem, the convenor of UP CIDS Program AltDev, and a retired professor of Asian Studies at the UP Asian Center.

For inquiries, please email [email protected] or call the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies at 981-8500 loc. 4266-68. To receive updates regarding the schedules, topics, speakers, etc., please sign up on our mailing list: https://marxat200ph.wordpress.com.

UP CIDS August to December 2017 Year-End Report

In August to December 2017, following the appointment of Teresa S. Encarnacion Tadem, Ph.D. as Executive Director, the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) revived its programmatic thrust established in the 1990s under the directorship of Ma. Cynthia Rose B. Bautista, Ph.D. Nine programs tackling policy questions on education and capacity-building, development, the social sciences, as well as the Local-Regional Studies Network were conceptualized last year.

UP CIDS also hosted a number of activities such as public lectures, roundtable discussions, and conferences in August to December 2017 with guests from the University, government agencies and civil society organizations, as well as scholars from the Asia-Pacific, Europe, and the Latin American regions.

In 2018, the programs convened by UP CIDS will be implementing their conceptualized agenda and activities in line with the role of the University of the Philippines as a research university in various fields of expertise and specialization on issues of national significance.

For a review of the events that transpired in the latter half of 2017 as well as a preview of its 2018 agenda, UP CIDS proudly presents its Year-End Report for August to December 2017.

The feature above allows for double-clicking to zoom in on the content.

The Year-End Report may also be downloaded here.

Update on UP CIDS Former Projects

Originally hosted by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS), CIFAL Philippines is no longer a program of UPCIDS effective January 2018. CIFAL Philippines now operates directly under the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, UP System.

 

Building Capacity Securitizing Energy: Prospects & Challenges for the Philippines

 

Last 3 May 2018, the Strategic Studies Program (SSP) of the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS), together with the Institute for Maritime Affairs and the Law of the Sea (IMLOS), conducted the first of the Building Capacity series of roundtable discussions (RTD), entitled Securitizing Energy: Prospects & Challenges for the Philippines. The RTD focused on the status of energy security in the Philippines with representatives from government agencies, members of the academe, and professionals from various private institutions.

Assistant Professor Nelson Cainghog from the UP Department of Political Science and a fellow of the SSP gave the opening remarks. He expressed the need for these kinds of endeavors which aim to contribute to the discourse on national security. Prof. Cainghog also stated the growing need of the country in terms of energy and expressed hope that this RTD could start a conversation on how to develop policies towards securing adequate sources of energy.

 

Department of Energy Undersecretary Jesus Cristino P. Posadas presented the policies of the current administration with regard to providing power and securing energy reserves. Dr. Mario Aurelio, the Director of the National Institute of Geological Sciences, gave a presentation on the status of energy in the country from the perspective of a geoscientist. Clarifications were made with regard to the official policies of the Department of Energy and their implications on the policies of other departments, such as those of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Department of Science and Technology. It was also an opportunity to establish connections between the government agencies and the academe as the discussion dealt mostly with how policies crafted and advanced by the country’s policymakers and bureaucrats could complement the technical expertise of the country’s scientists and engineers.

 

The Building Capacity Series of roundtable discussions focuses on exploring the various kinds of strategic responses the Philippines should adopt in order to build national capacity in the face of changing power dynamics in the international system. The objective of the RTD series is to provide a venue for experts from various fields to discuss and share their insights on selected important matters, with the aim of contributing to the national security and development discourse.

Are We There Yet? What it Will Take to Win the Philippine War on Drugs

Key Points

  • The number of Filipinos who fear that there are many drug addicts in the Philippines is increasing. However, government and police authorities are increasingly faced with local as well as international criticisms over their handling of the drug problem.
  • The drug problem facing the country cannot simply be reduced to supply-and-demand issues. Any effort by government to address the drug problem in the Philippines must by necessity adopt a comprehensive approach that is both multi-sectoral and multi-dimensional targeting not just users and pushers but society-at-large. The problem of illegal drugs cannot be seen simply and solely as a police and criminal matter. Therefore, punitive and retributive measures will not suffice.
  • Government authorities need to reframe the anti-illegal drugs campaign less as a war against suspected criminal elements and more as a social development issue aimed not only at reforming and rehabilitating drug abusers but also preventing and curbing the onset of drug abuse altogether. Moreover, efforts need to be urgently exerted by police authorities especially not to turn the anti-drug campaign into a war against the poor.

Download the full policy brief here.

CIDS Press Release 2018-001

Wide Disparity in PH Nursing Licensure Exams’ Passing Rates Observed – UP CIDS Study

In the Philippines, the nursing education system is plagued by a large number of underperforming nursing programs with a wide disparity in passing rates across schools.  This is according to a Policy Brief on nurse education program performance released by the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative Development Studies.

The overall performance of the entire nursing education system in the country is crucial for local health service provision. In 2017, Department of Health (DOH) data reveal a shortage of health workers (doctors, midwives, etc.), most notably severe among nurses at around 270,000, in the country.  This is amidst having a large pool of unemployed or underemployed licensed nurses who are aspiring to work abroad.

In the policy brief, Senior Research Fellow of UP CIDS Dr. Geoffrey Ducanes and Higher Education Research and Policy Reform Program Convenor Dr. Clarissa David showed that, on average, the schools that are more likely to perform poorly in the licensure exam were those characterized by “a high student-to-faculty ratio, are located in Mindanao, are private, small, and were established in the 1980s. “

According to the brief, a one-unit increase in the student-faculty ratio is associated with a 0.2 percentage point decline in a school’s passing rate, controlling for other variables. Also, private schools, on average, have 12 percentage-points lower passing rates than those in State Universities and Colleges (SUCS). Furthermore, nursing schools in Visayas tend to perform better, in terms of passing rates, relative to those situated in Luzon and more so in Mindanao. Size and age of the educational institutional also matter. That is, the larger and the older the school is, the more likely that it will perform better in licensure exams, controlling for other factors.

The paper also categorized some nursing programs as low-performing and high-performing. 64 out of the 461 schools that had exam results from 2012-2016 were identified as low-performing. Bulk of these schools are private and small schools and are from Mindanao.

It must be noted, however, that the authors qualified that the study is limited in that it based program performance on a single indicator, results of the Professional Regulatory Commission (PRC) exam. They added that multiple metrics must be used to provide a full assessment, which includes total program cost in relation to passing rates, graduation rates, admissions policies, and over a longer view, the salaries of nurses that graduate from different programs. More data are needed in order to conduct these studies.

Ducanes and David recommends that CHED make information on Higher Educational Institutions (HEIs) quality publicly accessible, to guide students in making informed decisions. Incentive mechanisms, such as “most improved” types of awards, may also be put into place to nudge the schools to improve their program performance. They also highlighted the importance of interagency cooperation in achieving systems reform. Most importantly, primary focus of reforms must be targeted towards areas where low performing schools are concentrated.

CIDS Policy Brief full text and appendixes are available here: http://cids.up.edu.ph/nurse-education-program-performance-evidence-from-licensure-exams/

For questions and inquiries please send an email to [email protected].

Pre-launch lecture of Noel de Dios of Marx 200 Commemorative Series

Free and open to the public!

“What the New Institutional Economics Owes to Marx” is the pre-launch of the year-long series of lecture-forums commemorating the 200th birth anniversary of Karl Marx organized by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies Alternative Development Program (UPCIDS AltDev) on Friday 4 May 20184-5 pm at the UP School of Economics.

The actual launch of the series will be held on Saturday May 5, 2018 2 pm to 5 pm at the UP CIDS Main Conference Hall, featuring two keynote speeches by Prof. Roland Simbulan and Dr. Herbert Docena.

 

School Licensure Exam Performance and Engineer Shortage in the Philippines

This policy brief examines the licensure exam performance of HEIs in the four most popular engineering fields: civil; electrical; electronics; and mechanical engineering. Although there are observed differences across programs (e.g., much higher passing rate in mechanical compared to electronics engineering), two consistent findings from the analyses are that small schools tend to perform much worse than larger schools, and the student-to-faculty ratio is inversely related to performance. These results suggest that the school’s financial capacity and, therefore, their ability to invest in well-equipped laboratories and to hire an adequate number of well-trained faculty may be especially crucial in engineering. Policy responses are necessary to improve the availability of quality engineering programs. Interventions will be necessary to increase the number of future engineers to support the government’s planned heavy investment in infrastructure and development outside Metro Manila.

Download here.


Teacher Education in the Philippines: Are we meeting the demand for quantity and quality?

The quality and capacity of the country’s basic education system relies, to a great extent, on the ability of the Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to train a sufficient number of promising teachers to hire annually. This policy note seeks to describe the state of teacher education in HEIs
as reflected by their performance in the Licensure Exam for Teachers (LET). Analysis of the passing rates of HEIs suggest that (1) there is an insufficient total number of LET-passers each year to supply the needs of the basic education sector, (2) there are areas of the country where there are lower numbers of LET passers, and fewer high-performing HEIs in teacher education, and (3) a large portion of each year’s LET takers are on at least their second attempt and are much less likely to pass than first-time takers. Recommendations for further research and review of the teacher professionalization tracks are discussed.

Download here.


Nurse Education Program Performance: Evidence from Licensure Exams

This policy brief provides an overview of the performance of nursing schools across the country. Using licensure exam passing rates as the main indicator of program quality, we examine features of higher education institutions (HEIs) that are correlated with program performance. Data on passing rates between the years 2010 and 2016 are sourced from the Philippine Regulatory Commission (PRC) and data on features of schools come from the Commission on Higher Education (CHED). Overall, evidence shows a wide disparity in passing rates across schools, ranging from 3% to 100% in 2016 for schools with at least 10 exam takers, with a large number of underperforming nursing programs operating around the country. The passing rates in nursing board exams are consistently lower in small private HEIs that are newer schools and located in Mindanao and NCR. State Universities and Colleges (SUCs) on average have higher passing rates than other types of HEIs. Policy recommendations and directions for further research to improve outputs of nursing education in the Philippines are discussed.

Download here.

 


Notice of vacancy – Research/Publications Assistant

Job description

  • Assist in the preparation and publication of technical and academic outputs (such as white papers, policy papers/briefs, monographs, and journals.)
  • Update and maintain website and page content.  
  • Layout and design policy briefs, discussion papers, and other related publications.
  • Coordinate with Programs on the submission of their outputs for publication.
  • Read any submission assigned to him/her by the issue editor or the managing editor and determine if it is of academic or scholarly journal quality.
  • Conduct plagiarism check.
  • Do a preliminary review evaluation as to the sustainability of the submitted manuscript for peer review.
  • Recommend points for editorial revisions to prepare the assigned manuscript for peer review.
  • Perform other tasks assigned by the Executive Director.

Qualifications

Applicants must:

  • Hold a bachelor’s degree relevant to the job.
  • Have a critical appreciation of scholarly literature.
  • Have experience in academic publishing including copyediting, proofreading, coordinating with authors and reviewers.
  • Proficient with MS word.
  • Preferably have working knowledge on publication design and layout including the use of relevant Adobe programs (InDesign or Photoshop).

Interested parties may submit their motivation letter, curriculum vitae (CV), Transcript of Records (ToR), and two samples of their written work to [email protected]. Please feel free to get in touch with the Publications Unit through the phone numbers below for any inquiries.

** Deadline for applications on 30 April 2018. Salary to be determined based on applicant qualifications. 

[ANNOUNCEMENT] Data Science for Public Policy: Applications & Experiences

 

We are inviting faculty, researchers, and students to a public forum titled “Data Science for Public Policy: Applications and Experiences on the 19th of April 2018, 1:30-3:30 PM at the UP CIDS. This forum is part of the CIDS Data Science for Public Policy Program’s series of fora and workshops running from April to September 2018.

The Data Science for Public Policy Program is among the initiatives of the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) of the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Program aims to feature the work of the UP community in data science as applied to challenges in public policy and governance. In relation to this, the Program endeavors to build and engage a community of faculty and encourage the pursuit of interdisciplinary problem-oriented research using high-level quantitative analyses. Other objectives include organizing multidisciplinary teams with social scientists, humanists, and scientists to conduct research on issues in the public sector.

There will be 5 studies featured in this forum where each panelist will discuss their work, and engage the audience in discussion. Please see attached files for the programme.

The forum is free of charge. There are limited slots available. We encourage you to register by sending an email to [email protected] on or before April 17, 2018 (Tuesday).

Should you have further queries, kindly contact us at [email protected]

Workshop on Exploring Alternatives in Managing Sovereign Debt 11 April 2018

The debt burden of the Philippine government has long been a barrier to achieving social and human development in the country.The issue of strategic, meaningful and just resolution of the debt problem through a campaign that included the push for a Congressional investigation and audit of public debt and contingent liabilities has reached a breakthrough in 2016, with the inclusion of a provision in the 2017 and 2018 General Appropriations Act for a debt audit by the Congressional Oversight Committee on the Official Development Assistance (COCODA). This workshop aims to finalize an operational framework for the debt audit that is consistent with the agenda of the Freedom from Debt Coalition and the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development, and consonant with the interests of the Filipino people.

UPCIDS-ISP held Focus Group Discussion on Shariáh Court and PD 1083

The UP CIDS-Islamic Studies Program (UP CIDS-ISP) initiated the first step towards the enhancement of PD 1083 by conducting a Focus Group Discussion (FGD) on Shari’ah Court and Muslim Personal Laws (CMPL) among Ulama (religious scholars), members of the academe, women’s groups, representatives from non-government organizations (NGOs) and the youth sector, as well as Shari’ah counselors in partnership with the UP Institute of Islamic Studies and Anak Mindanao (AMIN) Party List led by Representative Amilhilda J. Sangcopan.

The FGD was held at Marcian Hotel in Zamboanga City on March 29, 2018. This is part of the series of consultations and activities that UP CIDS-ISP will undertake in collaboration with AMIN Party List to prepare a Bill that will elevate CMPL, otherwise known as Presidential Decree (PD) 1083, to a Republic Act through the Congress.

The establishment of Shari’ah Courts under the mandate of Presidential Decree 1083 affirms the pluralistic legal system in the country. Under this legal system, non-Muslims are governed by the Family Code whereas PD 1083 governs personal laws of Muslims. One of the most glaring examples of the differences between the two systems is the recognition of divorce and polygyny under PD 1083 while under the Family Code, divorce and polygyny are not recognized.

Apart from the urgency to elevate PD 1083 to a Republic Act, there are contentious provisions of the Code that need to be reviewed and amended as well as insertions of additional provisions that will make the Code truly responsive to the needs of the Muslims in the Philippines.

The Shari’ah Courts cater to the need of growing Muslim population in the Country pegged at 12 million or 11.0% of the entire population (NCMF statistics 2015).

AltDev co-sponsors public forum on the “Dengvaxia Nightmare”

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Alternative Development (AltDev) along with the Alternative Budget Initiative – Health Cluster, DIGINIDAD, Focus on the Global South, Trade Justice Philippines, WomanHealth Philippines, Inc., and the UP Third World Studies Center organized the public forum “Dengvaxia Nightmare – People Clamor: Did Anyone Really Care About People’s Health?” last March 9, 2018.

Ms. Ana Maria R. Nemenzo from WomanHealth Philippines explained that the forum was not intended to find out who is right or wrong or to point who is guilty and culpable. The forum approached the issue of Dengvaxia as a public health issue and looked at ways on how to avoid a similar public health problem from happening again in the future.

The forum began with University of the Philippines – Manila Health Policy graduate student  Maria Fatima Villena discussing Sanofi’s decision to change the Dengvaxia label. Aside from premature claims of absolute safety (in children aged 9 or more), the baseline risk was low. The sample population in the clinical trial was at 31,000 but 800,000 school-age children were vaccinated by the government. Villena also asserted that Dengvaxia is not an issue of age but one of serotype. What is worrying in the light of the “Dengvaxia Nightmare” is the public’s increasing distrust and lack of confidence in vaccination programs, healthcare services, and the Department of Health as an institution.

Mercedes Fabros from WomanHealth Philippines chronicled the timeline of civil society’s engagement with the bureaucracy. The Dengvaxia issue is a clear manifestation of how the health sector policy making, planning, budgeting, and monitoring principles and processes are closely interlinked. Fabros presented their group’s engagement with the government, citing organization and personal notes, news articles, and the House of Representatives–Department of Health budget hearing minutes. She stressed that the ₱3.5 Billion-worth Dengvaxia program was never discussed in any of these hearings in 2015 and during the budget preparation and legislation phases for the FY 2016 budget.

Amihan Abueva, the Regional Executive Director of Child Rights Coalition – Asia, focused on “Human Rights and Informed Consent: Safeguarding the Best Interest of the Child”. She presented action points for moving forward: a) transparency from the programming to the monitoring of services for children and for every citizen to be mindful of the child’s “best interest” when engaging with public programs and services; b) surfacing mechanisms allowing “child participation” in similar programs and ensuring informed consent; c) assertion of public servants in their right to capacity-building relevant to the performance of their functions; d) provision of remedial measures from the State that allows children and their families to seek effective remedies for abuse or violations when business enterprises are involved; e) prevention of the persistence of negative perceptions of the country’s Vaccination Program; and f) paramount consideration of the best interests of children in public programs and services.

Rachel Abian from the Concerned Parents of Vaccinated Children shared how she found out her child was vaccinated with Dengvaxia in 2016 and her experience engaging with uncooperative health centers and how they handled her child’s case. She also raised concerns not only for the mental health of the children vaccinated with Dengvaxia but also for the parents and family members.

The last panelist, Dr. Walden Bello, talked about the conflicts of interest in the public health sector. He touched on three things: Sanofi’s role, the Former Secretary Janette Garin and the Department of Health’s role, and his critique of the “Doctors for Truth” Statement.

Dr. Ramon P. Paterno, as panel reactor, presented the people’s oversight on health. He called for broadening people’s coalition from the Dengvaxia issue to oversight on health and health care; demanding Free Health Care for Dengvaxia immunized children to Free health care for “Dengvaxia” families to Free Health Care for all Filipinos based on citizenship and not enrollment in PhilHealth; and for organized and empowered communities to serve as a foundation to safeguarding our health.

The public forum was attended by 67 participants from various Civil Society Organizations, the academe, and the media.

* Photo credit to Fe Manapat of WomanHealth

AltDev hosts workshop on Universal Health Care

Maximizing the space for civil society voices, AltDev co-sponsored a multi-stakeholder workshop on Universal Health Care.

In an effort to continue the call for a comprehensive Universal Health Care (UHC) system in the country, a multi-stakeholder consultation of civil society groups, medical practitioners, and professionals was co-sponsored from March 19 to 20, 2018 by the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Alternative Development (AltDev).

The gathering was an opportunity for the broader civil society to take a closer study on the several versions of UHC Bill pending in Congress which is one of the priority legislations included in the Legislative-Executive Advisory Council list for the 2nd regular session of the 17th Congress.

This activity, mainly organized by ABI Health Cluster – Social Watch Philippines, was to recognize the significant role of peoples’ participation in shaping national policies such as the UHC Bill. Through a 2-day discussion and workshop, participants were able to develop their critique, positions, and recommendation on the UHC Bill, as well as strategize their upcoming plan to critically engage the legislators on this pending bill.

Civil society representatives in the workshop reiterated their campaign for a UHC that adheres to the principles of primary health care, by putting more emphasis on health as a human and constitutional right. With that recognition, they stressed that “every Filipino shall be entitled to healthy living, working, schooling conditions and access to needed promotive, preventive, curative, rehabilitative and palliative health services” that is of sufficient quality and effectivity and should be based on health needs and not on one’s ability to pay health services or providers.

In September 2017, the House of Representatives approved House Bill 5784 or an “An Act Providing for a Universal Health Care Coverage for All Filipinos and Appropriating Funds Therefore.” A counterpart bill, SB 1458, was also filed in the Senate last year. To date, with two other recently filed UHC bills in the Upper House, the Senate Committee on Health is already conducting regional public hearings and consultations.

* Photo credit to Fe Manapat of WomanHealth

MOST Academy on Inclusive Policy and Valorization of Knowledge on 21-22 March 2018

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS), in cooperation with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the Philippine National Commission for UNESCO (NATCOM PH), will be holding the UNESCO Management for Social Transformation (MOST) Academy on Inclusive Policy and Valorization of Knowledge on March 21 to 22, 2018 at Brentwood Suites, Quezon City.

The UNESCO MOST Academy is a 2-day training-workshop which aims to strengthen the competence for evidence-informed decision making of UNESCO Member States. It serves as the culminating activity of a 6-month research project by the UP CIDS and UNESCO entitled “Valorization of Research and Evidence on Inclusive Social Development to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals in the Philippines”.

This project aims to promote the principle of social inclusion with a particular focus on increasing access to healthcare by addressing the shortage of primary care workforce. It includes a research of programs that address the shortage of health workforce and a training-workshop to enhance valorization of research and evidence for social inclusion. The project likewise serves as a space for NGA-CSO interaction/collaboration.

For more information and other related inquiries, please contact Nikka Garriga of the UPCIDS-UNESCO Project on Social Inclusion at [email protected] or via mobile at 0966 168 1343.

Civil Society Workshop on Universal Health Care (UHC): Towards a People-centered UHC Bill on 19 – 20 March 2018

The Universal Health Care (UHC) Bill is one of the priority Legislative and Executive agenda. It is included in the Legislative Executive Advisory Council (LEDAC) list for the 2nd regular session of the 17th Congress.

People’s right to participation, considered as the “right of rights,” means having a say in how decisions that affect their lives are made, including the development of a health system through participation in health policy-making, implementation, monitoring, and review.

To be able to continue critically engaging UHC in the Senate deliberations and processes, ABI Health Cluster-Social Watch Philippines, in partnership with University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) Program on Alternative Development, will hold a two-day Civil Society Workshop on 19-20 March 2018, from 9am to 5pm, to do the following:

  1. Provide a venue for civil society levelling-off on the Universal Health Care (UHC) Bill
  2. Develop a civil society position and recommendation on Universal Health Care
  3. Plan for ABI Health Cluster’s executive-legislative engagement on the UHC Bill

The workshop will be held at the UP CIDS (Bahay ng Alumni Lower Groundfloor).

EMIT C4C Inclusive Value Chain Learning Session with Smallholders

Credits: Jollibee Group Foundation

On 22 January 2018, researchers from the EMIT C4C Center, together with faculty members from the Erasmus University Rotterdam, and institutional partner Jollibee Group Foundation (JGF), conducted a learning session with representatives of various farmers’ organizations involved in the Farmer Entrepreneurship Program (FEP). The assembly was held in the office of the KALASAG Farmers Producers Cooperative (FPC) in San Jose, Nueva Ecija. The organizations represented included farmer leaders of cooperatives from Ilocos Sur, Laguna, and Benguet. Members of the City Agriculture and City Cooperative offices of the local government were also present.

 

Credits: Jollibee Group Foundation

The meeting commenced with a short tour of the KALASAG FPC’s farm sites and facilities, supplemented with informal information sharing on onion planting practices and technology. The tour was followed by discussions, where representatives exchanged challenges encountered and experiences gained as part of the FEP.

The learning session equipped the researchers with a more grounded understanding of the FEP and its implementation. More importantly, it provided an avenue for various farmers’ organizations to learn from each other.

A background on EMIT C4C is provided in the program profile found here.

MEETING: Department on Interior and Local Government-National Capital Region (DILG-NCR) Federalism Study

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies Program on Social and Political Change (UP CIDS-PSPC) will embark on a research project in partnership with the Department on Interior and Local Government – National Capital Region (DILG-NCR) that looks into the implications of federalism on the National Capital Region (NCR).

On March 1, 2018, UP CIDS PSPC and DILG-NCR met with prospective research partners from several UP institutions and units. Representatives from the UP School of Urban and Regional Planning (SURP), UP National Center for Transportation Studies (NCTS), UP Resilience Institute – Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards Center (UPRI-NOAH Center), UP Institute for Islamic Studies (UP-IIS), UPD National Institute of Physics (NIP), UP College of Social Sciences and Philosophy Department of Political Science (UP CSSP DPS), and the UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development (UPAD) discussed the prospects and potential of the project.

The study aims to assess the strong and weak points of governance in NCR thus identifying areas that need reform. It also aims to identify the functions of the national government that can devolve to regional governments, such as NCR, and functions of regional governments that can devolve to local government units (LGU).

The project will adopt a multi-disciplinary framework that will look into the political, economic, social, and environmental aspects of governance and reform. The workshop generated insights and recommendations from the participants that will propel the project forward. It was highly suggested that a review of previous studies on decentralization and devolution, specifically in the context of NCR, be produced before further studies can be developed.

A comparative study of metropolitan arrangements in other federalist countries is a point of interest as well as determining the possible general principles with which formation of states may be based on. Other proposed topics were transport planning in NCR, Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in NCR, and rural-urban linkages under federalism.

Public Forum: “Dengvaxia Nightmare: People Clamor — Did anyone really care about people’s health?” on 9 March 2018

WomanHealth Philippines,  in cooperation with the U.P. CIDS Program on Alternative Development and the U.P. Third World Studies Center, together with Alternative Budget Initiative-Health Cluster, DIGNIDAD Coalition, Focus on the Global South and Trade Justice Pilipinas are organizing a public forum entitled “Dengvaxia Nightmare: People clamor – Did anyone really care about people’s health?” on Friday, March 9, from 1:00pm to 5:00pm at the U.P. Center for Integrative Development Studies (U.P. CIDS), on the lower ground floor of U.P. Bahay ng Alumni.

About the Forum 

Dengvaxia has become a household word for better or for worse. The subject of current marathon hearings in both Houses of Congress, it is also at the center of a raging controversy. Some defend the product and the program that implemented it as one whose benefits outweigh the possible harm. Others point out that potential harm raised red flags that indicate the precautionary principle as a better guide for action.

More than 800,000 school children have been vaccinated with Dengvaxia. The announcement of Sanofi Pasteur in November 2017 that the vaccine may bring increased risk of severe dengue in children who have not had dengue before vaccination caused alarm and panic among the public, especially among the parents of vaccinated children. Inevitably, this new development raised many questions demanding immediate answers. Soon the dengue manufacturer, Sanofi Pasteur, the DOH officials, dengue vaccine experts, public health and medical professionals, the Public Attorney’s Office, media and the public all weighed in.

Interested participants may confirm at [email protected], or call/text 09166979010 or (02) 9273319. View and download the concept note and program here

EMIT C4C conducts Anchor Themes Workshop in UP Mindanao

Dr. Pelkmans-Balaoing (left) and Dr. van Tulder (right) of the Rotterdam School of Management

The EMIT C4C (Escaping the Middle Income Trap Chains for Change: Partnerships for Inclusiveness and Competitiveness), a program under the UP CIDS in collaboration with the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (RSM), conducted an Anchor Themes Workshop on 27 January 2018 at the UP Mindanao Campus in Davao City. The activity was organized by Prof. Glory Dee Romo of the UP Mindanao School of Management. Attendees include UP Mindanao faculty from the business, economics, and natural science disciplines, UP Mindanao graduate students, and guests from the government, donor agencies, and civil society organizations.

The workshop formed discussions surrounding the action research initiative of the EMIT C4C and its fundamental findings, which have engendered the anchor themes presented. The exchange with stakeholders both substantiated and enhanced the research data on the systemic issues of agriculture value chains. Dialogues on potential areas of partnership between EMIT C4C and UP Mindanao were also initiated through the forum.

UP Mindanao Chancellor, Dr. Sylvia Concepcion, delivered the opening remarks and attended the entire workshop. The speakers that tackled the Anchor Themes were Dr. Annette Pelkmans-Balaoing (Elaboration on the EMIT C4C and the Anchor Themes Workshop; Inclusive development and peace: The Unifrutti-LaFrutera-Hineleban case; and Undertaking Action Research Projects) and Dr. Rob van Tulder (Elaboration on the EMIT C4C and the Anchor Themes Workshop; The Nature of Wicked Problems; and Inclusive business strategies and peace) of the RSM, Prof. Vlademir Shuck (Democratizing Food Governance through Direct Marketing Strategies: The Case of Vegetable Farmer Clusters in Marilog, Davao City) and Prof. Thaddeus Acuna (Contextualizing inclusive business: Financial perspective) of the UP Mindanao, and EMIT C4C senior researcher, Ms. Jane Capacio (Cooperatives, Property Rights, & Agriculture Contracts). Dr. Pedro Alviola IV of the UP Mindanao facilitated the discussions as the moderator.

The Escaping the Middle Income Trap Chains for Change: Partnerships for Inclusiveness and Competitiveness (EMIT C4C) is a program under the UP CIDS that aims to develop action research cases on front runner companies and civil society organizations (CSOs) engaged in agriculture value chains.  The primary interest is to scrutinize and understand the key elements that would enable inclusive and sustainable partnerships in Philippine agricultural value chains in order to effectively involve and benefit smallholders, indigenous peoples, and other rural poor populations.  The program intends to build collaborative learning and cross-sectoral partnerships for inclusive and sustainable agriculture value chains among corporations, CSOs, government agencies, the academe, and farmer groups.

Chancellor Concepcion opens the Workshop (left); a UP Mindanao student participates in the discussion (right)

The Workshop speakers and attendees

3rd Katipunan Conference: The Philippine Strategic Outlook 2018-2019

From February 27-28, 2017, the Strategic Studies Program (SSP) of the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) and the Institute for Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea (IMLOS) organized the 3rd Katipunan Conference with theme “The Philippine Strategic Outlook: 2018-2019” at Law Center, Bocobo Hall, Osmena Avenua, UP Diliman, Quezon City 1101. The conference focusing on strategic studies was attended by more than 200 participants representing the diplomatic community, government, academe, students, security sector, and other members of the Philippine strategic community. The Katipunan Conference aims to gather eminent security experts, scholars, and practitioners to discuss and analyze pressing strategic issues facing the Philippines.

The keynote address was delivered by National Security Adviser Secretary Hermogenes G. Esperon, Jr. He highlighted the importance of strategic analysis and appreciation of the global and regional strategic environments surrounding the Philippines. He also identified the “hedging strategy” of the Duterte administration in its pursuit of a more independent foreign and security policy through the pursuit of new strategic partnerships with China, Russia, and India while maintaining old alliances with the US and others. He also announced a proposed bill to create a research fund called “Science for Change” that aims to provide support for research dealing with national and human security.

The conference featured four panels examining the Philippine strategic, domestic, and regional environment. Speakers include academic experts on strategic studies, government officials, and representatives from the military and the private sector. Specific topics include ICT (Information and Communications Technology), climate change, regional security architecture, political stability, economic sustainability, and maritime issues. The final panel of the conference focused on forecasting the immediate direction and prospect of the Philippines strategic environment, where national capacity building was prominently discussed.

The Katipunan Conference is an annual strategic studies conference launched in 2015 as a platform for discussing current and emerging issues that impact the Philippine foreign policy and undertake a strategic scan of the international environment from multiple perspectives to produce practical and informed policy opinions and decision-making aids for government agencies and officials. It also is a venue where scholars and practitioners can engage in meaningful dialogue about pressing strategic issues facing the country.

UPAD hosts roundtable discussion on “Assuring Affordable, Quality, and Accessible Public Services for All”

The Thematic Social Justice Cluster of the Asia – Europe People’s Forum concluded its three-day conference with a roundtable discussion with parliamentarians, academics, and civil society organizations at the Center for Integrative and Development Studies last February 15, 2018.

The roundtable discussion aimed to share with parliamentarians, specifically the Filipino legislators from the senate and congress, the important discussions from the conference on the impacts and alternatives to privatizing essential public services and gather recommendations from parliamentarians on how they can put forward or contribute in the realization of the advocacies of civil society towards affordable, quality, and accessible public services.

The Program on Alternative Development (UPAD) Co-Convenor Dr. Eduardo C. Tadem saw the relevance of hosting the dialogue with European and Asian parliamentarians and academics at UPCIDS, the University’s primary research and policy center that was “[envisioned as a] policy research unit [that harnesses both] the multidisciplinary expertise of the university towards the resolution of the nation’s political problems [and the] expertise of the university on issues of national significance.” Sectoral issues discussed during the first two days of conference were health, water, transport, housing or right to the city, education, and energy.

Ms. Lidy Nacpil, the coordinator of the Asian People’s Movement on Debt and Development, moderated the roundtable discussion on “Critical Issues on Public Services” which was divided into three main topics: Privatization, Public Private Partnerships (PPPs), and the common approach and mode used by governments on assuring public services by Professor David Hall, the founding director of Public Services International Research Unit (PSIRU); alternatives to privatization of public services by Ms. Satoko Kishimoto from the Transnational Institute (TNI); and the impact of Free Trade Agreements on public services by Barry Coates, Former MP in New Zealand.

PSPC Co-Hosts Policy Action Conference on Federalism

The UP CIDS Program on Social and Political Change (PSPC), in partnership with the Center for People Empowerment in Governance (CenPEG), the UP-CSSP Department of Political Science, and Taiwan Foundation for Democracy, held a one-day conference last February 7, 2018 entitled, Key Issues on Federalism: A Policy Action Conference.

A conference on constitutional change that broadens the public discourse and brings in the people’s perspective on federalism and other national issues is sorely needed, according to CenPEG Director for Policy Studies, Professor Bobby Tuazon. Public surveys reveal that the public knows very little about the proposals to move to Federalism and about the 1987 Constitution as well. The debate on Cha-Cha has had government officials and political scientists talking amongst themselves. However, this matter is too serious to be left alone to them. As such, providing a platform where the academe, NGOs, civil society, and the general public can voice their concerns and insights is crucial to the process of constitutional change.

The conference’s keynote speaker was former UP President Professor Emeritus Jose V. Abueva. For decades, Dr. Abueva has been a strong advocate for federalism and in his keynote he critiqued the 11-state structure that is being proposed. Instead, metropolitan arrangements which are states that are organized based on their revenue generating capacity is what he recommends.

PDP-Laban Federalism Institute Executive Director Jonathan Malaya started the first panel with his presentation of the PDP-Laban Model of Federalism. Following him is PSPC Co-Convenor & UP-CSSP Department of Political Science Chair Dr. Maria Ela Atienza who shared the Department’s points on this debate which forwards the idea that maybe other alternatives, such as incremental reform of the 1987 Constitution, can help us better achieve the outcomes expected from Federalism. Former Bayan Muna Rep. Neri Colmenares critiqued three federalism proposals and selected certain provisions which highlights the tendency that efforts at amending the constitution are “attended by the imposition of self-serving political agenda.”

The second and third panel of the conference discussed national issues and how changing the system of government to federal will affect them. Dean Ronald Mendoza of the Ateneo School of Governance talked about political dynasties in LGUs and Professor Julkipli Wadi of the UP Institute of Islamic Studies shared his insights on the fate of the Bangsamoro Basic Law in light of the administration’s prioritization of Cha-Cha. The third panel began with Dr. Joseph Capuno of the UP School of Economics with sharing the country’s experience in devolution through the Local Government Code. Dr. Maragtas Amante, former UP Vice President, on the other hand, presented our experience on decentralization through the tripartite regional wage fixing scheme. To end the day’s presentations, Former DAR Secretary Rafael Mariano spoke on the prospects of President Duterte’s (Proposed) Federalism and its impact on Agrarian Reform and Rural Development.

Many of the speakers and participants expressed concern over the direction that the Charter Change is taking. Many think that Cha-Cha under this administration is just as untrustworthy and dangerous as many members of the Congress and officials of LGUs are actively campaigning for it. This administration is also known for being suppressive of any opposing body and so a free and democratic forum may not be possible as well. Dr. Joseph Capuno of the UP School of Economics said that, “There is a competition with unequal footing so you can already predict the outcome of the competition.”

In the future, the public may have to vote whether in support of Federalism or otherwise. It is crucial then that the public be made aware of the issues that surround the discourse. Members of the media, policymakers, and government officials need to be careful, complete, and accurate in disseminating information about this campaign. Framing Federalism as a form of government that, by nature, will rid our country of economic and political problems will only lead to the disillusionment of the public. What must be done is the broadening and strengthening of public engagement and involvement of academic institutions and civil society in this process of constitutional change.

 

 

PSPC Hosts Public Lecture on the Democratization Experience in Taiwan

Last February 8, 2018 the UP CIDS Program on Social and Political Change together with the UP CSSP Department of Political Science organized a public lecture by Dr. Herlin Chien of the Wenzao Ursuline University of Languages in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. In this lecture, Dr. Chien shared with the students and faculty of the University of the Philippines the role that the middle class played in Taiwan’s economic and political development.

Dr. Chien discussed a brief history of Taiwan which showed the path they took towards becoming a developmental state. Much debate is present regarding the relationship of economic development and democratization. Some say that they are mutually exclusive, that countries can be economically developed but not democratic, while others say that they come hand in hand. In Taiwan’s case, the rise of the middle class in the 50s to the 80s paved the way to greater democratization.

From 1952-1982 Taiwan saw through its “economic miracle” with a growth of 8.71%. This has been, at large, a result of nationalizing their industrial production through the intensification of export processing zones. During this period, inequality rates in Taiwan also decreased. Dr. Chien noted that the more economic growth the higher quality of democracy is demanded by the public. Such is the case in Taiwan where the middle class started demanding for more rights and broadened the influence of civil society.

Governments should pay close attention to the relationship of the state and civil society, says Dr. Chien. Ideally, the government should make an effort to ensure cross-sector cooperation and citizen participation in decision making processes thus achieving this through consensu. In the end, the government becomes a civic enabler or a co-governing guardian to citizens.

Taiwan envisions a democratic government that is horizontal rather than vertical, participatory rather than representative, and collaborative rather than adversarial. And they have done so by providing citizens with the means for sustainability not just through jobs but also through social welfare, health care, education, land reform and so on.

EMIT:C4C holds Anchor Themes Workshop at UPSE

The EMIT C4C: Partnerships for Inclusiveness and Competitiveness, a program under the UP CIDS in collaboration with the UP School of Economics, held the Anchor Themes Workshop last February 1, 2018 at the UP School of Economics. The workshop clarified and elaborated the key themes of the EMIT C4C Center and engaged practitioners in a dialogue on these themes so as to enhance the analysis that drives their theory of change, as well as help scientists enrich the literature by incorporating the perspectives of the main protagonists themselves.

The workshop was opened by Dr. Teresa Encarnacion Tadem, director of the UP CIDS. The speakers included Prof. Emmanuel de Dios of UPSE (Escaping the Middle-Income Trap and role of Inclusion and Competitiveness in Agriculture), Prof. Rob van Tulder (The Nature of Wicked Problems and Sustainable Supply Chains) and Prof. Annette Pelkmans-Balaoing  (Action Research) of the Rotterdam School of Management, Prof. Ron Chua (Agricultural Financing) of AIM, and researchers from the program, Jane Capacio (Cooperatives, Property Rights & Agri Contracts) and Reinier de Guzman (Business for Peace). The discussants were Gisela Tiongson – Executive Director of the Jollibee Group Foundation (JGF), NEDA Assistant Secretary Carlos Abad-Santos and former DAR Sec. Gil de los Reyes. The attendees included Ms. Patricia Alverdia of the Netherlands Embassy, Dr. Roberto Acosta of East West Seed Company, and the core staff of JGF, Office of the Vice President & PinoyME.

The Escaping the Middle-Income Trap: Chains for Change  (EMIT:C4C) is a program under UP CIDS that aims to develop action research cases on frontrunner companies and civil society organizations engaged in agriculture value chains.  The primary interest is to understand how smallholder farmers, indigenous peoples, and other rural poor populations are involved in and benefit from inclusive and sustainable agriculture value chains.  The program intends to build knowledge and constituents for inclusive agriculture value chains from among companies, CSOs, government agencies, and academic institutions.

UPAD Hosts Philippine Book Launch of “A Time To Rise: Collective Memoirs of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (KDP)”

Last February 2, 2018, the UP Center for Integrative Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Alternative Development (UPAD) and the Program on Social and Political Change (PSPC), the UP Third World Studies Center, the UP Department of Political Science, and the Laban ng Masa held the Philippine book launch of A Time to Rise: Collective Memoirs of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (KDP).  

A Time to Rise, which is more than a two-decade undertaking according to Editor Cindy Domingo, not only narrates the stories of activism against the dictatorship in the Philippines – it also brings into light the role of KDP in fighting racism, fascism and imperialism in the US.  The book chronicles the forty-three accounts of the Union of Democratic Filipinos during the politically turbulent 1970s and ‘80s, the full and multifaceted picture of KDP recruitment, organizing, and training, and women’s central role in the organization and its leadership.

Dr. Maria Victoria R. Raquiza from the UP National College of Public Administration and Governance, Social Watch – Philippines, and Laban ng Masa, served as the moderator of the Philippine book launch. She invited Dr. Eduardo C. Tadem, the Co-Convenor of UPAD, current President of the Freedom from Debt Coalition, and former Professor of the UP Asian Center to give the welcome remarks.

Dr. Eduardo Tadem acknowledged the presence of UP CIDS Executive Director Dr. Teresa S. Encarnacion Tadem, UPCIDS Program on Social and Political Change Co-Convenor and the UP Department of Political Science Chairperson Dr. Maria Ela L. Atienza, UP Third World Studies Director Dr. Ricardo Jose, and the attendees comprised of former KDP members and their families and friends, civil society organizations, academics, and students.

Armin Alforque’s commentary on Philippine political exiles

The book launch began with Mr. Armin Alforque’s commentary on Filipino political exiles, which he defined as “anyone who, because of political conditions in the Philippines, had to leave the Philippines or had left previous to those conditions and could no longer go back.”  Albeit miles away from the Philippines, the Philippine international community in the US maintained their ties with the government and were affected by the declaration of Martial Law. The impact however varied across communities because of the broad spectrum of political involvement where the formation of KDP was the consolidation of the left wing movement.

Mr. Alforque also showed pictures of the KDP activities from a press release of their Anti-Marcos Coalition where several Filipino exiles were signatory to and a photo of Filipino exiles welcoming visiting human rights lawyers from the Philippines.

He also highlighted the important role that Filipino exiles play even when overseas. Because of the natural support from the US – Filipino community, the Filipino political exile and their contributions became much stronger, vibrant, and meaningful. “Something that perhaps those that would read this book and the lessons it has might want to research and study in terms of relevance.”

Mr. Alforque stressed that “a Filipino exile should play a key role in the discussion taking place here in the Philippines event though they’re abroad.” Their participation in the movement is conditioned by the community they are in and without the support of the community, that person – that exile – wouldn’t be as effective.

 

Cindy Domingo on the KDP’s Book Project

Cindy Domingo, one of the editors of the book, shared the importance of writing about the Philippine-American experience because there are “rows and rows of books about the Vietnamese-American and Chinese-American books but very little of Philippine-American books and international solidarity.” She hoped that this book will add to the understanding and fight the stereotype of Filipinos as passive people. “We have a history of organizing against racism, fascism, and imperialism. We are organizers and we fight against the isms that oppress us.”

The KDP Book Project also envisions to serve as an inspiration to the next generation of Filipino-Americans and Asian-Americans to continue the fight against discrimination and fascism and strengthen the solidarity of Filipinos around the world. The book also speaks of the particular experience of Filipino-Americans and how they negotiate these identities.

According to Ms. Domingo, A Time to Rise is not a comprehensive history of the KDP. Instead, it is a collection of personal accounts of the people involved in the movement. In writing these personal stories, the book turned into a corpus of moving pieces about the sacrifices people made, their highs and lows, and their hopes and disappointments in the movement. These reflections covered a moment, a day, and even years in the movement.

Aside from the personal stories the book also included the struggles that the organization itself faced: conflicts with the Philippine Left during the post-Aquino assassination, surveillance and harassment from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Philippine Government under the “Philippine Infiltration Plan.”

Ms. Domingo described the organization as “unusual” where in they advocated for socialism in the context of the US: the right to housing and the right to be educated about the history of Philippine – American communities, the struggle for representation, US imperialism in the Philippines – and the freedom from discrimination. The organization also had dual nature in its composition of Filipino exiles, Filipino – Americans, old people, young people, Japanese – Americans which they brought together under its program. One program of KDP was its theoretical school that met every year “where they laid the basis to continue to analyze the changing political situations of the Philippines and the US.”

After Ms. Domingo, two excerpts from the book were read. “Defending Nurses — I’d Do it Again” by Esther Hipol Simpson, a leading member of KDP chapter in Chicago and a registered nurse, who lobbied against the deportation of H-1 Visa nurses during the late 1970s, a time where nurses were facing deportation for having failed their board licensure examinations. The second excerpt was from Edwin Batongbacal’s “No Regrets” which began with the question “Why was I ever drawn into the movement?”

 

Ricardo Jose: Commentary on A Time to Rise: Collective Memoirs of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (KDP)

To end the program, Dr. Ricardo Jose of the UP Third World Studies Center and the UP Department of History gave a brief commentary on the book. He described the book as “intensely personal, riveting, and revealing” as it gives us a glimpse of the lives led by people who were united by a common concern for country and for the community. “

Dr. Jose hopes for the release of a Philippine edition of the book and, perhaps, a Filipino edition as well. This book provides a different perspective on the anti-Marcos struggle that needed to be written about and deserves to be read especially by Filipinos in the Philippines and around the world.

 

The Tokyo University of Foreign Studies University Press Publishes Comprehensive Filipino Textbook

Last 13 February 2018, Michiko Yamashita-Shimizu from the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, visited UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Executive Director Dr. Teresa S. Encarnacion Tadem to donate her textbook entitled Comprehensive Filipino Textbook to the UP CIDS Resource Collection.

The University Press, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, published the Comprehensive Filipino Textbook on 7 February 2018, the third publication in its Foreign Language Textbook series following Russian and Arabic. The book is a comprehensive textbook for learners of Filipino who can read Japanese. It makes use of the Japanese language, and is meant to be used by learners of Filipino at any level from beginner to advanced.

The book features the following:

  1. Systematic and easily understandable explanations of grammatical features
  2. Practical conversations on useful and relevant topics
  3. Exercises to enhance understanding of grammar
  4. Word lists and lists of useful expressions on specified topics
  5. Short articles and extra information regarding the culture, history and political situation in the Philippines
  6. Japanese equivalents for all words in the textbook
  7. A downloadable recording of the conversation and word list

The Comprehensive Filipino Textbook is authored by Michiko Yamashita-Shimizu, Leith Casel- Schutz and Kunio Takano of the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies. The authors are all UP alumni.

3rd Katipunan Conference: The Philippine Strategic Outlook 2018-2019 on 27-28 Feb

 

​The Strategic Studies Program (SSP) of the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS), in partnership with the Institute of Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea (IMLOS) is hosting the 3rd Katipunan Conference: The Philippine Strategic Outlook 2018 – 2019 on February 27 – 28, 2018 (Tuesday 8:30 – 5:00 & Wednesday 8:30 – 12:00) at the Law Center, University of the Philippines, Osmena Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City 1101.

About the Conference 
Launched in 2015 as a platform for discussing current and emerging issues that impact Philippine foreign policy and undertake a strategic scan of the international environment from multiple perspectives to produce practical and informed policy opinions and decision-making aids for government agencies and officials. It also is a venue where scholars and practitioners can engage in meaningful dialogue about pressing strategic issues facing the country.

 

This event is open to the public but slots are limited. Please register at https://goo.gl/forms/DuuytDbZxowogRkb2

Registration closes on Friday, February 23, 2018.

For inquiries please email [email protected]

A Time to Rise: Collective Memoirs of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (KDP) – Book Launch on February 2

The UP CIDS Program on Alternative Development and the Program on Social and Political Change , the UP Third World Studies Center, the UP Department of Political Science, and Laban ng Masa invite the public to the Philippine book launch of A Time to Rise: Collective Memoirs of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (KDP) edited by Rene Ciria Cruz, Cindy Domingo, and Bruce Occena, with foreword by Augusto F. Espiritu.

Cindy Domingo, one of the book’s editors, will be present at the event.

The event will be held on Friday February 2, 2018 at 4:00 pm at the UP CIDS Conference Hall, Lower Ground Floor, Bahay ng Alumni, Magsaysay Ave. UP Diliman.

This event is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first-come-first-served basis. Refreshments will also be served.

If you are interested in attending the event, you may click ‘Going’ on the official Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/153638818622117/

What Does the Middle Class Want? Democratization Experience in Taiwan

The UP Center for Integrative Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Social and Political Change, together with the UP Department of Political Science, will be holding a public lecture by Dr. Herlin Chien on What Does the Middle Class Want? Democratization Experience in Taiwan on 8 February *, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Department of Political Science AVR, Third Floor, Silangang Palma Bldg., UP Diliman. The lecture is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis

About the speaker
Herlin Chien, Ph.D. is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of International Affairs and Director of the Masters Program in Southeast Asian Studies at Wenzao University of Languages in Taiwan. With her Ph.D. in Political Science emphasizing Comparative Politics from the National Sun Yat-Sen University (Taiwan) and a Masters Degree in International Affairs from Georgia Technology Institute (USA), she has published several articles dealing with the issue of power sharing, rule of law versus rule of man, and how the public sector can partner with the private sector to solve social problems. Between 2006-2007 she was a visiting scholar at École Normale Supèrieure de Lyon (France) and in 2007-2008 at the University of California, Irvine (USA).
If you are interested in attending the event, sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/ozOI7oReKDRq9v933

Are We There Yet? What It Means to Win the Philippine War on Drugs: A Roundtable Discussion on 7 Dec

The UP Center for Integrative Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Social and Political Change will be holding a roundtable discussion (RTD) entitled Are We There Yet? What It Means to Win the Philippine War on Drugs on 7 December 2017, 2:00 to 5:00 P.M. at the Conference Hall of the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies, Lower Ground Floor, Bahay ng Alumni, UP Diliman. The discussion is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

About the event

For about a year now since Duterte started this campaign, we have been hearing of so many deaths (many say needless) of so-called drug suspects. The extent of these casualties has reached a point where even international organizations have begun to take notice. Yet this “war” continues and the administration seems to be proud of such high body counts.

This RTD is intended to put the question of what really are the targets for this kind of campaign. Are body counts sufficient basis to say that the government is winning this war against illegal drugs? Were targets ever set at the beginning of this campaign?

This RTD will move away from the usual approach of crime and policing towards one where scholars and experts from different disciplines will be asked to speak on their views on the goals / targets (and the absence thereof) of the anti-drug campaign.

 

If you are interested in attending the event, you may sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/k72lANmnUdKc5d7x2

Marine Technology Cooperation in East Asia: The Case of Smart Ocean For China & ASEAN – A Public Lecture by Chan Hing Lee Henry on 6 Dec

The UP Center for Integrative Studies (UP CIDS) Program on Strategic Studies, together with the Institute for Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea (IMLOS), will be holding a public lecture on Marine Technology Cooperation in East Asia: The Case of Smart Ocean For China & ASEAN on 6 December, 9:30 A.M. to 12:00 P.M. at the Ambion Room, First Floor, Malcolm Hall, College of Law, UP Diliman. The discussion is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

The Smart Ocean initiative can help ASEAN to develop scientific solutions to address the marine related problems of climate change, ecosystem degradation and environmental management. Many enabling technologies to help address these marine related problems are already developed in China. The question is how to transfer them to cooperative platforms between ASEAN and China.

 

About the speaker
Chan Hing Lee Henry is an adjunct research fellow at the East Asia Institute, National University of Singapore. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (1981) from the University of the Philippines, Master of Science degree in Biopharmaceuticals (2004) from the University of New South Wales and Ph.D. in General Management (2017) from the Singapore Management University.

 

If you are interested in attending the event, sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/eM08WJSvTonwpRNE3

Program on Alternative Development hosts public forum calling to “End U.S. Blockade Against Cuba”

On October 18, 2017, the UP Center for Integrative Development Studies’ Program on Alternative Development (UPAD) along with the Philippines – Cuba Cultural and Friendship Association hosted Her Excellency, Ibete Fernandez Hernandez, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Cuba to Malaysia and the Philippines, in a public forum entitled “End U.S. Blockade Against Cuba”. As the Center’s advocate of non-mainstream and unorthodox development practices, UPAD Co-convenor Dr. Eduardo C. Tadem sees the event as meaningful since Cuba has consistently been at the forefront of promoting and setting examples for alternative development.

Ambassador Fernandez discussed the current situation of the blockade by the United States (also commonly referred to as the Blocque) and how it has affected the Cuban people. The Blocque, so deeply entrenched in the system of law, has obstructed the economic, commercial, and financial development of the Cuban people for over six decades. Trade has taken a backseat due to the tightening financial and extraterritorial dimensions of the blockade policy. The manifestations are most evident in how operations have dwindled in normally functioning and fully operational Cuban banking institutions due to fines being imposed on foreign companies with commercial relations in Cuba. This has likewise deterred international banks from transacting with Cuba for fear of being fined and prosecuted.

The Obama administration enforced several measures aimed at easing the U.S. embargo on Cuba but these have been limited; other numerous restrictions have remained unchanged and significant transactions still cannot be completed. The Blocque, under incumbent President Donald Trump, has been tightened when he signed the National Security Presidential Memorandum on Strengthening the Policy of the United States Toward Cuba. The further tightening of the blockade translates to the prohibition of economic, commercial, and financial transactions of U.S. companies and entities with Cuban companies. There has also been a strengthening of the ban on travel to Cuba, eliminating individual travels under the category of people-to-people exchanges.

Ambassador Fernandez sees the Blocque as the only obstacle for full development and enforcement of human rights in Cuba. It continues to be a massive, flagrant, and systematic violation of the human rights of all Cubans. It is not only an obstacle to international cooperation and a setback in bilateral relations between US and Cuba, it qualifies as an act of genocide under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide of 1948.

Cuba has turned to the support of the international community in their legitimate call to end the Blockade. The United Nations (UN) General Assembly on November 1, 2017 adopted a resolution that underscores the need to end the embargo imposed against Cuba, reiterating that UN Member States must “refrain from promulgating and applying laws and measures not conforming with their obligations under the UN Charter and international law, which reaffirm freedom of trade and navigation.”[1]

On November 1, 2017, 191 out of 193 UN Member states voted favorably to consider the end of the embargo; only the United States and Israel opposed the resolution.

 

[1] UN News Centre (November 1, 2017). “UN General Assembly again calls for lifting US embargo against Cuba.” Accessed November 7, 2017. http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=58011

Indonesia’s New Populist Order and Diffused Progressives in Comparative Perspective: A Public Lecture by Olle Törnquist on 16 Nov

The UP Center for Integrative Studies (UPCIDS) Program on Alternative Development, together with the UP Department of Political Science will be holding a public lecture by Olle Törnquist on Indonesia’s New Populist Order and Diffused Progressives  in Comparative Perspective on 16 November 2017*, 10:00 a.m. onwards at the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies, Lower Ground Floor, Bahay ng Alumni, UP Diliman. The discussion is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

Neo-liberal oriented growth and elitist democratisation has bred in Indonesia a new populist order, with former local businessperson, mayor, governor and now president Jokowi in the forefront. In this context, perhaps partly as in the Philippines, there has been some space for progressives, but also for right-wingers. What are the prospects for popular politics?

About the speaker

Olle Törnquist is Professor of Political Science and Development Research, University of Oslo. He has focused since the early 1970s on the problems and options of popular organisations and democratisation, especially in Indonesia and India, with some references to the Philippines. He has also co-directed Indonesian democracy studies programmes with committed scholars, activists, and journalists since the mid-1990s. His recent books include Assessing Dynamics of Democratisation, with L. Djani et al., Dynamics of Populist Transnationalism, and the co-edited volumes Democratisation in in the Global South, Reclaiming the State: Overcoming Problems of democratisation in Post-Soeharto Indonesia, and Reinventing Social Democratic Development: Insights from Indian and Scandinavian Comparisons.

*It was previously announced that the event will be held on 15 November, but due to the recent declaration of a non-working holiday, the lecture was moved to 16 November.

If you are interested in attending the event, sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/NfMUEnU643HWhr1z2

Formulating Reforms in the Philippine Electoral System: A Public Lecture by Paul Hutchcroft on Oct 25

The UP Center for Integrative Studies (UPCIDS) Program on Social and Political Change together with the UP Department of Political Science will be holding a public lecture by Paul Hutchcroft on Formulating Reforms in the Philippine Electoral System: Insights from the ‘Electoral System Redesign for Development’ Project on 25 October 2017, 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. at the Department of Political Science AVR, 3rd flr. Silangang Palma, University of the Philippines-Diliman. The lecture is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

About the lecture

In many settings throughout the world, development outcomes are commonly undermined by political systems that a) privilege the quest for patronage over the implementation of policy; b) skew service delivery to narrow electoral considerations rather than broader development objectives; and c) incentivise corruption to finance election campaigns that are centred around give-aways rather than programs or issues. Arguably the most promising way to address these constraints on development outcomes is through electoral system redesign, where relatively small changes can have big impact. (By electoral system, we refer in part to the formulas used to convert votes to legislative seats: ‘first past the post’ plurality systems, proportional representation etc.)
 
This talk surveys a project on ‘electoral system redesign for development’, part of the Coalitions for Change program of the partnership between the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and The Asia Foundation. As the Philippines is considering highly ambitious revisions to its constitution, the goal of this project is to highlight the capacity of well-considered electoral redesign to contribute to larger and long-sought-after goals of political reform. While there is of course no magic bullet when it comes to building stronger political parties and curbing entrenched patronage structures, electoral system redesign has the capacity to begin to promote these goals with relatively low risks of unintended consequences.

About the speaker

Paul Hutchcroft is a scholar of comparative and Southeast Asian politics who has written extensively on Philippine politics and political economy. He has recently reassumed his post as Professor of Political and Social Change at the Australian National University after serving for four years (2013-2017) as Lead Governance Specialist with the Australian aid program in the Philippines. Hutchcroft joined the ANU in 2008, and was founding Director of the School of International, Political and Strategic Studies (since renamed the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs) in the ANU’s College of Asia and the Pacific from 2009 to 2013.
 
Hutchcroft served on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1993 to 2008, and has had shorter term appointments with the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies (1991 to 1993) and the Asia Research Institute of the National University of Singapore (2004 and 2005). He holds a B.A. from Macalester College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University. Since Hutchcroft first arrived in the Philippines in 1980, he has returned as often as possible and travelled throughout the archipelago: from Basco to Bulusan, Puerto Princesa to Catbalogan and Zamboanga to Tandag—as well as lots of places in between.

If you are interested in attending the event, sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/91jUQpMhTqMWFihH3

UPCIDS Program Examines the Course of Duterte’s Administration

In a forum organized by the Third World Studies Center, the UPCIDS Program on Peace and Conflict Transformation (PCT Program), and the UP Department of Political Science; experts attempted to identify the course of Rodrigo Duterte’s presidency. “Ang Direksyon ni Duterte,” held in the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy in UP Diliman, featured talks on key issue areas in Duterte’s administrative agenda: constitutional change, national security, and economic policies.

 

 

Convenor of the PCT Program and political science professor Miriam Coronel-Ferrer compared current efforts towards a federal and parliamentary system to strategies used in the early 1970s for constitutional reform. She recounted how the 1971 Constitutional Convention was compromised by the declaration of martial law, leading to a new constitution largely produced by Malacañang. The difference between then and now, according to Professor Ferrer, is that there remain institutional avenues for the public to participate even as there may be serious doubts regarding the premises and intent of the Malacañang-led initiative today.

Describing the country’s armed forces to be ‘overstretched’ primarily due to the major military operations in Marawi City, defense analyst Jose Antonio Custodio questioned the probability and sustainability of declaring martial law nationwide. Aside from the operations against the Maute group, Mr. Custodio discussed various other security issues including the growth of CPP-NPA forces, the observed restraint exercised by the MILF, and the current situation in the West Philippine Sea.

Mr. Ricardo Reyes sees a continuation of the previous administration’s macroeconomic policies in Duterte’s term, paying attention to some of his unimplemented promises such as putting an end to contractualization and prioritizing land reform. The Laban ng Masa National Coordination Member also expounded on proposed tax reforms, the government’s ‘borrowing binge’ for massive infrastructure programs, and a possible debt crisis in the Philippines as a result of this borrowing behavior.

 

 

In the forum, the speakers agreed that the direction to which President Duterte’s administration is heading remains unclear. They emphasized the need for the public to remain vigilant in these times.

Post-Democratic Regimes and the Businessification of the State and Civil Society: A Public Lecture by Kevin Hewison on 8 Nov

The UP Center for Integrative Studies (UPCIDS) Programs on Alternative Development, and Social and Political Change, together with the UP Department of Political Science will be holding a public lecture by Kevin Hewison on Post-Democratic Regimes and the Businessification of the State and Civil Society on 8 November 2017, 10:00 a.m. onwards at the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies, Lower Ground Floor, Bahay ng Alumni, UP Diliman. The discussion is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

About the lecture

The struggle for civil society is one in which business dominates the state in post-democracies. The businessification of the state results in the state and business engaged in a two-prong effort to businessify the organizations of civil society. Businessification means that CSOs will tend to be supportive of – or at least non-challenging to – the state. For Petras (1999, 435) there has been a tendency for “apolitical” postures amongst NGOs, and observes that “their focus on self-help depoliticizes and demobilizes the poor.” Yet the post-democracy argument is not that civil society is lost or that NGOs have sold out. Rather, in politics, democracy is weakened by businessification. For the organizations of civil society, as bussinessification takes hold of them, there is a diminution of activism that contributes to the narrowing of political space, the rise of anti-politics and the domination of business elites.

About the speaker

Kevin Hewison is a Weldon E. Thornton Distinguished Professor of Asian Studies (Emeritus) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Contemporary Asia. He has written extensively on the topics of globalization and democratization. He is currently exploring research in globalization and social change in Southeast Asia, especially Thailand; democratization; and labor issues.

If you are interested in attending the event, sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/JffRhCsN7yiEMPW12

2nd Melbourne Forum on Constitutional-Building Co-Hosted by the Program on Social and Political Change

The Constitution-Building Program of the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA) and Melbourne Law School’s Constitution Transformation Network held the Second Melbourne Forum on Constitution Building in Asia and the Pacific last October 3 and 4. The forum explored the theme From Big Bang to Incrementalism: Choices and Challenges in Constitution Building. This year, the Forum was hosted by the University of the Philippines Diliman Department of Political Science and the Program on Social and Political Change of the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS).

The Forum brought together academics and practitioners from across the Asia-Pacific and Latin American regions to share their experiences in constitution building in their respective polities. This year, it aimed to enhance understanding on constitutional change through collaboration as the insights gathered from the case study countries will foster in depth discussions on the relative magnitude of constitutional change and its varied executions. Furthermore, it identified issues that inform constitution-building and constitution-thinking especially within a diverse and rich region as the Asia-Pacific.

Organized into five sessions exploring themes on the process and substance of constitution-building, each session begins with each presenter giving short country case studies and providing key insights offered by their experiences. After these presentations, the latter part of the session opens the floor for questions and discussions involving the participants.

The first session discussed the making a new constitution, factors that have influenced the decision, and the different techniques adopted by the country case studies. Representatives from the Philippines, Maldives, and Thailand talked about their countries’ experiences (or potential in Chile’s case) in crafting a new constitution.

The second session tackled cases in which constitutional amendment was preferred to crafting a new constitution. In these cases, the circumstances that dictated this decision, the consequences of such a decision, and the magnitude of constitutional change it has brought was discussed. The panel for this session composed of representatives from Indonesia, Taiwan, Pakistan, and Argentina.

The last session for the forum’s first day expounded on the substance of constitutional change, specifically moving between a presidential and parliamentary system. The cases of Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, South Korea, and Sri Lanka showed the issues that could lead to states shifting from one form of government to another and how the design and implementation depends on the local historical, cultural, political, and economic context.

Cases of countries that moved or plan to move from a unitary state to a federal/devolved state started off the forum’s second day. Actions made by Nepal, Myanmar, Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea to shift to federalism or increase the degree of devolution in their country were driven by the call for self-determination by ethnic minorities. Difficulties in ensuring equality in the distribution of power and resources between center and periphery proved to be challenges in these cases as well as the importance of compromise for all parties involved.

The fifth session of the forum discussed cases where countries have decided not to defer or postpone constitutional change in light of controversial issues. Deferral or postponement of constitution building in India, Fiji, Bougainville, and Iraq were caused by matters of religion, ethnicity, cultural practices, peace issues, and independence

The forum’s final session provided an opportunity for participants to reflect on international institutions, such as the United Nations (UN), and their supportive role in constitution building. For the UN, in conflict prevention and peace-making, constitutional causes need constitutional responses. While it is recognized that the UN has its limitations, the speakers emphasized the importance of the active participation of member states in the UN to empower its efficacy.

Insights were also raised regarding choices on the magnitude of constitutional change that would inform future initiatives in the Philippines and the Asia-Pacific. As the Philippines is currently considering significant constitutional change with its plan to transition to federalism, private citizens are in a dilemma. The need for constitutional reform is palpable but whether the time is right for genuine reform under the current administration remains in question. Nevertheless, the Forum concluded that genuine reform at the constitutional moment must be citizen-led. It ended on a note that encouraged better articulation of the reform project and the issues surrounding it to increase public participation.

These two days of the Melbourne Forum opened up avenues for discourse on the range of techniques and the variety of causes for constitutional change. This forum distinguished itself as an opportunity for regional neighbors in Asia-Pacific and beyond to engage in international dialogue and to apply the understanding gained from comparative knowledge.

Islamic Populism in Indonesia and the Middle East, a Roundtable Discussion (RTD) with Vedi R. Hadiz on 21 Oct

The UP Center for Integrative Studies (UPCIDS) Programs on Alternative Development, and Social and Political Change, together with the UP Department of Political Science will be holding a roundtable discussion on the book “Islamic Populism in Indonesia and the Middle East,” on 21 October 2017, 10:00 a.m. onwards at the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies, Lower Ground Floor, Bahay ng Alumni, UP Diliman. The discussion is free and open to the public, but seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

About the book and the discussion

Vedi R. Hadiz. Islamic Populism in Indonesia and the Middle East. Cambridge University Press. 2017.

In a novel approach to the field of Islamic politics, this provocative new study compares the evolution of Islamic populism in Indonesia, the country with the largest Muslim population in the world, to the Middle East. Utilising approaches from historical sociology and political economy, Vedi R. Hadiz argues that competing strands of Islamic politics can be understood as the product of contemporary struggles over power, material resources and the result of conflict across a variety of social and historical contexts. Drawing from detailed case studies across the Middle East and Southeast Asia, the book engages with broader theoretical questions about political change in the context of socio-economic transformations and presents an innovative, comparative framework to shed new light on the diverse trajectories of Islamic politics in the modern world.

  • Charts the evolution of Islamic populism in Indonesia, comparing it to the Middle East
  • Offers a novel framework to understand the diverse trajectories of Islamic politics in the modern world
  • Engages with debates on religion, politics and social change

About the speaker

 Vedi R. Hadiz is Professor of Asian Studies at the University of Melbourne. Previously he was Professor of Asian Societies and Politics at Murdoch University’s Asia Research Centre and Director of its Indonesia Research Programme. An Indonesian national, he was an Australian Research Council Future Fellow in 2010-2014. Professor Hadiz received his PhD at Murdoch University in 1996 where he was Research Fellow until he went to the National University of Singapore in 2000. At NUS, he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology until returning to Murdoch in 2010. His research interests revolve around political sociology and political economy issues, especially those related to the contradictions of development in Indonesia and Southeast Asia more broadly, and more recently, in the Middle East.

Aside from his latest book Islamic Populism in Indonesia and the Middle East (Cambridge University Press 2017), his other books include Localising Power in Post-Authoritarian Indonesia: A Southeast Asia Perspective (Stanford University Press 2010), Workers and the State in New Order Indonesia (Routledge 1997) and (with Richard Robison) Reorganising Power in Indonesia: The Politics of Oligarchy in an Age of Markets (RoutledgeCurzon 2004,), as well as the co-edited Between Dissent and Power: The Transformation of Islamic Politics in the Middle East and Asia (Palgrave Macmillan 2014) and the edited Empire and Neoliberalism in Asia (Routledge 2004). His articles have appeared in such journals as Development and Change, New Political Economy, Democratization, Journal of Development Studies, Pacific Review, Pacific Affairs, Third World Quarterly, Journal of Contemporary Asia, Critical Asian Studies, Indonesia, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies and Historical Materialism.

Professor Hadiz has been a visiting scholar in the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS) in France, the International Institute of Social Studies in the Netherlands, the Centre of Southeast Asian Studies in the University of Kyoto and the Department of Sociology in the University of Indonesia, where he is also an Adjunct Professor.

If you are interested in attending the event, sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/EC7TnW22HTyyquD92

UPCIDS, UNESCO Hold Workshop for Joint Project on Social Inclusion in the Philippines

 

On 22 September 2017, representatives from the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS) under the Program on Alternative Development, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) , UNESCO National Commission of the Philippines (UNACOM), and other national stakeholders gathered for the start-up workshop of the joint project now titled, ‘Transforming Research into Policy on Inclusive Social Development to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals in the Philippines’.

 

 

With the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in mind, this project intends to promote the principle of social inclusion. In line with this, scholarship is given much attention for its potential to be a capable instrument in reviewing the current landscape and policies in the country involved in promoting social inclusion. As such, a Philippine Working Group (PWG) has been formed composed of UPCIDS as the lead agency, National Economic Development Authority (NEDA), Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS), Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA), Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA), Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), and Commission on Human Rights (CHR) coming from the side of government. Civil society organizations, particularly Buhay Na May Dignidad Para Sa Lahat (DIGNIDAD) and the Network for Transformative Social Protection (NTSP), also form part of the project. More agencies are expected to be involved as the project progresses.

 

 

In the workshop, the PWG agreed to focus on community health programs and their health workforce as the project’s scope of study. This project is expected to be completed in six months. Currently, members of the PWG are working together to concretize the succeeding stages of the program. It is hoped that this undertaking will be able to identify the gaps in the current policies and assist in translating these policies into practice to achieve a more socially-inclusive development trajectory in the Philippines.

 

Photos courtesy of UNESCO National Commission of the Philippines (UNACOM).

 

UP CIDS Program Opens “National Day of Protest” with a Public Forum

Shortly after the UP Carillon’s 65th anniversary ceremony in the morning of September 21 followed “#MAYPASOK: Isang Malayang Talakayan ng mga Nagbabagang Isyu” – a public forum jointly organized by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies Program on Peace and Conflict Transformation (PCT Program), the UP Department of Political Science, and the Third World Studies Center.

The PCT Program had earlier hosted an informal discussion where faculty, students, and civic groups shared their opinions and raised their concerns regarding the current political and social conditions in the country. In the discussion, the public forum was conceptualized as a course of action in response to the tense political atmosphere brought about by the recent threat from the Philippine president of a nationwide imposition of martial law.

Adopting the title “#MAYPASOK” reiterated the importance of dialogue and participation, notwithstanding the suspension of work and classes in government and public schools on the ‘National Day of Protest’ declared by the President. The forum sought to contextualize a range of national issues to foster a more holistic understanding of the Duterte administration’s actions and policies.

During the event held at the UP Diliman Carillon Plaza, speakers Miriam Coronel-Ferrer, Eduardo Tadem and Josephine Dionisio spoke on issues such as the culture of violence and impunity surrounding extrajudicial killings, the weakening of political institutions, regressive tax reform policies as well as a looming debt crisis. Speakers Pedro Abraham Jr. and Amado Mendoza Jr. also discussed their experiences and thoughts from the Martial Law era of President Ferdinand Marcos. In light of current political conditions, the speakers called for a renewed will for public service and vigilance.

“I have learned to forgive all my torturers, all my keepers… Unfortunately also, I cannot forgive some. I cannot forgive Ferdinand Edralin Marcos, Imelda Marcos, Bongbong Marcos… all those technocrats who deodorized, prettified that murderous regime – enabling that regime to borrow billions of dollars which we are all paying for today.”

“I renew my commitment of service. My commitment is to you. To our people. I will do everything I can to serve you as public intellectual, as teacher…” – Prof. Amado “Bong” Mendoza, Jr.

“…[K]ailangan din nating maalala kung papaano sistematikong sinikap ng mga puwersa ng kadiliman na puksain, pigilan at busalan ang mga grupo na nagdadala noong intensyon na palalimin yung mga demokratikong institusyon at proseso sa ating bayan. [A]ng challenge ay para sa henerasyon niyo na alamin yung kasaysayan at maging mapanlikha sa pagtatayo ng iba’t-ibang paraan ng pakikipag-isang hanay.” – Prof. Josephine Dionisio

The PCT program hopes to continue these efforts to conduct relevant discussions and fora engaging the wider public, especially in the context of issues related to the evolving peace and conflict situation in the Philippines.

[Photos taken by Richard S.M. De Leon, College of Mass Communication]

 

Public Policy Journal: Open Call For Papers

Public Policy: Journal of Interdisciplinary Development Perspectives (PPJ), a peer-reviewed journal published biannually by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS), welcomes submissions in the form of full-length manuscripts and book reviews. PPJ provides a multidisciplinary forum for examining contemporary social, cultural, economic and political issues in the Philippines and elsewhere.

There is no deadline for submissions. Interested authors may submit all-year round. Guidelines for submission are outlined in the section below.

All inquiries concerning the submission of articles should be addressed to:

The Editor
Public Policy Journal
UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies
Lower Ground Floor, Bahay ng Alumni
Magsaysay Ave., UP Diliman
Quezon City 1101 Philippines
Tel. No. 981-8500 loc. 4266 and 4268
E-mail: [email protected]

Submission Guidelines for Public Policy Journal (PPJ) manuscripts:

  1. Authors should submit an electronic copy (in MS Word format) to the Editor at [email protected] with the subject “PPJ Submission – [Author’s Last Name]”.
  2. Manuscripts submitted must be original, unpublished work not under consideration for publication elsewhere. By submitting a manuscript, the authors agree that the exclusive rights to reproduce and distribute the article have been given to the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS).
  3. The text should be double-spaced with a 12-point font and employ italics rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  4. The manuscript should comprise between 6000 to 10000 words, inclusive of references and bibliography
  5. The manuscript must include an abstract of 250 to 300 words. A list of strictly 6 keywords; suitable for indexing, abstracting services and on-line searching purposes must also be provided.
  6. PPJ uses the author-date system of the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) for citations. A complete list of references cited should be provided at the end of the text. Notes, if any, must be kept to a minimum and placed at the end of the article before the list of references.
  7. The author should provide a brief biographical note on a separate sheet. This sheet must include the author’s full postal and e-mail addresses as well as telephone and/or fax numbers.
  8. As PPJ undertakes a double-blind peer review process, authors should be prepared to rewrite their articles in accordance with the comments and suggestions of referees.

Submission Guidelines for Public Policy Journal (PPJ) book reviews:

  1. Authors should submit an electronic copy (in MS Word format) to the Editor at [email protected] with the subject “PPJ Submission – [Author’s Last Name]”.
  2. Book reviews submitted must be original, unpublished work not under consideration for publication elsewhere. By submitting a book review, the authors agree that the exclusive rights to reproduce and distribute the article have been given to the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS).
  3. The text should be double-spaced with a 12-point font and employ italics rather than underlining (except with URL addresses). The book review must not exceed 1000 words.
  4. PPJ uses the author-date system of the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) for citations. Complete details of the book being reviewed by the author must be provided at the beginning of the text. A complete list of references cited aside from the book being reviewed, if any, should be provided at the end of the text as well.
  5. The author should provide a brief biographical note on a separate sheet. This sheet must include the author’s full postal and e-mail addresses as well as telephone and/or fax numbers.

Dialogue on China-PH relations and latest Chinese developments on education

There will be a dialogue between the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) and the UP Asian Center with members of the committee of foreign affairs of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Committee. The head of the delegation is Mr. Yuan Guiren, the former Education Minister of China. Mr. Guiren’s delegates include some embassy staff.

The main objective of the meeting is to discuss China-Ph relations, introduce China’s latest developments, especially on education area and BRI.  The visit/meeting will be on August 30, 2:30 until 4:30 in the afternoon, at the GT-Toyota Seminar Room.

This meeting is under the Program on Strategic Studies (PSS) of the UP CIDS. This program’s convenor is Herman Kraft, Associate Professor of the Department of Political Science, College of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of the Philippines, Diliman.

Job Opportunity – Two (2) Research and Publications Assistants

The Center is looking for two (2) Research/Publications Assistants. See the details below. Deadline of submission of application will be on August 28, 2017. Only complete submissions will be entertained.

 Update: Applications for these positions are now closed. Thank you!

UP CIDS Welcomes its New Executive Director

 

Dr. Teresa S. Encarnacion Tadem is the new Executive Director of the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS).  She was appointed last August 01, 2017.

Dr. Tadem is Professor and former Chair of the Department of Political Science in the University of the Philippines Diliman (2000-2003).  She also served as  Director of the Third World Studies Center (TWSC) and editor of Kasarinlan: A Philippine Journal of Third World Studies (2004-2010).  From 2011-2013, she was President of the Philippine Political Science Association (PPSA) and Vice-President of the Philippine Social Sciences Council (PSSC).  Dr. Tadem was also a Visiting Research Scholar at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), Kyoto University, Japan in 2010 as well as a Visiting Professor at the Graduate School for International Cooperation Studies (GSICS), Kobe University, Japan from 2010-2011.  She was one of the recipients of the Natatanging Guro sa Gawad Chanselor Award 2009, University of the Philippines, Diliman, sixteen University of the Philippines System International Publication Awards (IPA) and nine University of the Philippines, Diliman Professorial Centennial Awards.

Dr. Tadem finished her bachelor’s degree in B.S. Foreign Service (Magna Cum Laude) and M.A. Political Science at the University of the Philippines Diliman. She obtained her Ph.D. in Politics and Public Administration at the University of Hong Kong in 1997.

Previously in UP CIDS, she served as Deputy Director for Research Monitoring and Evaluation from October 1997 to March 2000 and as Director for the Social Development Agenda Program from January 1999 – March 2000.

UP, NGCP launch ‘Grassroots Change’ for communities

In pursuit of public service and sustainable change, the University of the Philippines (UP) through the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS) has implemented the Nurturing Grassroots Change through Partnerships Project (Grassroots Change) with the National Grid Corporation of the Philippines (NGCP). Grassroots Change comprises a series of livelihood development activities through a “Skills Camp” with the goal of honing and enhancing the skills of project beneficiaries in their chosen field. The project is set to capacitate partner-indigent communities located near UP campuses/properties that host NGCP facilities, as they pursue their own start-up enterprises and other fruitful employment ventures.

UP and NGCP recognize that efforts of building communities must not be limited to their economic viability; and responsive and sustainable change must come from an appreciation of the people’s needs and ingenuity at the grassroots level. One must speak the community’s language, connect with their tolls, savor their food, and assist them as they steer their boats toward social change.

The program employs the conduct of a local scoping study, a community-wide needs assessment, and an interactive participatory planning session to ensure that the project stays true to its mandate. Inputs from such will be used to develop livelihood development activities for the communities which include a combination of technical skills and business-capability modules.

Grassroots Change is envisioned to deliver community-wide change through the partnership and synergy among the community, the academe, and the private sector.

In its kick-off year, the project has been focusing on communities within the municipalities of Los Baños in Laguna and Miag-ao in Iloilo, and the cities of Tacloban and Davao – wherein the needs assessment and the participatory planning have just concluded. Among the training areas identified by the community are Food and Meat Processing, Buri and Hablon Craftsmaking, Cacao Nursery, and Sewing, along with Product Marketing, Patent Registering and Organizing Local Cooperatives.

Click here to view more photos

UPCIDS in talks with TiKA for aid, library expansion

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS) represented by Mr. Joseph Cruzado and Centre International de Formation des Autorites et Leaders (CIFAL Philippines) represented by Ms. Jorica Pamintuan, discussed with Mr. Enes Doluküp and Ms. May Ditan of the Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency (TİKA) the possible points of collaboration for furthering development studies in a meeting held at the UPCIDS library on July 12.

Mr. Doluküp, Deputy Country Director of TİKA’s Manila Office gave an overview of TiKA’s objectives and activities. Per Doluküp, TİKA is focused on giving development aid in the Philippines. It has started initiatives such as livelihood programs in Mindanao.

TİKA eyes assistance in expanding the collections of the UPCIDS libraries. “The library is an instrument in shaping the youth for the future,” Doluküp said. TİKA has also expressed interest in collaborating with CIFAL Philippines in the future.

Time to think, talk about green space

In Photo: The Burnham Lake Park, a famous tourist attraction in Baguio City

Are there enough green space in so-called urban jungles in the Philippines? Apparently none.

As the Philippines embark on building spree, EarthThink, an advocacy and resource center that ventures in scientifically, economically and socially viable changes and solutions for sustainable and resilient communities, is pitching the preservation and improvement of existing, and possibly, development of more green spaces in the Philippines.

Mary Antonette Beroya-Eitner, founding president of EarthThink, said last week in an e-mail interview with the Businessmirror that  urban communities need not only urban parks, but other forms of green spaces, like green roofs and walls, green corridors, street streets, especially in areas where park development is not possible due to limitation in space.

A fellow at the University of the Philippines (UP) Center for Integrative Development Studies and Centre International de Formation des Autorités et Leaders Philippines, Beroya-Eitner noted there is a need to engage various stakeholders in scientific discourse on environment and ecology, climate change, disaster-risk reduction, ecosystem services and sustainability and resilience, to enable and challenge communities to make life-changing decisions and actions that impact the present and future generations.

Beroya-Eitner engages in information, education and communication activities, capacity-building, policy-lobbying to promote green space.

A geologist with a master’s degree in geology, specializing in landslide evaluation at the UP, she has a PhD in engineering geology, specializing in earthquake/liquefaction hazard assessment at the University of Hong Kong.

What is a green space?

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines green space, or open space, as any open piece of land that is undeveloped, has no buildings or other built structures, and is accessible to the public.

It can include land that is partly or completely covered with grass, trees, shrubs or other vegetation. These may be parks, community gardens and cemeteries, schoolyards, playgrounds, public seating areas, public plazas or even vacant lots.

According to EPA, “Open space provides recreational areas for residents and helps to enhance the beauty and environmental quality of neighborhoods.”

Beroya-Eitner broadly defines green space as areas covered by trees and plants. These can be parks, green roofs and walls, green corridors, or green streets or trees with plants and trees. Around 300 meters to 400 meters is considered an ideal area for green space.

“This is why this is the target in many places in Europe. Nantes [France], for example, has 100 percent of its citizens living within a 300-meter perimeter around a green space,” she said.

Urban development improvement

EarthThink is calling to preserve and improve urban parks and other green spaces, and develop new ones, to promote urban biodiversity, offer ecosystem services and contribute to the improvement of urban development.

“They [green spaces] may not offer as much ecosystem services as urban parks, but they can also contribute to the improvement of the urban environment,” she added.

“In other countries, like Japan and Germany, this is incorporated in the development plans of housing or subdivision and commercial buildings as required by law. In Darmstadt [Germany], for example, if you build your house now, especially in newly opened residential areas, you are required to have green roof above your car garage or carport,” she said.

In the Philippines, there are already some initiatives toward similar direction.

“There are already buildings that incorporate green spaces in their design. And there is already the Green Building Code, so it’s a good starting point,” she added.

Putting value to green

There is a need to study or assess the ecosystem services of urban parks and urban green spaces, in general, to highlight its importance, and to make such “values” concrete and tangible to policy-makers, communities and business, Beroya-Eitner said.

“It is always easier to drive people into action when you have numbers to show. With better information, better long-term decisions can be made toward improving our urban environment,” she added.

“A strong policy support, especially at the local level, is eventually needed for the successful promotion of urban parks and other green spaces as green infrastructure,” she added.

However, she believes the more immediate need is to increase people’s awareness of the concepts of ecosystem service and green infrastructure, and of the range of benefits urban parks and other green spaces can deliver, as concretized through ecosystem services assessment and valuation which are “relatively less-known in the country”.

Beroya-Eitner said where trees and plants are, valuable ecosystem services exist.

“The only questions are how much and in what form, as these depend on the [number of] trees or plants and structures in the park,” she added.

She said there’s no known existing studies or assessment of ecosystem services of parks in Metro Manila, or in the whole country.

However, urban green spaces, like the Quezon Memorial Circle and Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wildlife Rescue Center, are delivering considerable ecosystem services.

Green space and biodiversity

Beroya-Eitner said biodiversity is fundamental to the generation of ecosystem services because “without any biodiversity, there would be no ecosystem services”, citing carbon sequestration and pollination.

However, she noted that even the United Nations Environment Program in 2014 disclosed that the type and strength of the relationships between increasing numbers of species, or other aspects of biodiversity, and the delivery of ecosystem services remain less clear.

“This is particularly true in urban ecosystem, where the exploration of such relationship has only just begun,” she added.

Beroya-Eitner cited a study of Kremer et al. (2016), which presented the results of the three-year Urban Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services project.

One of the seven key insights from the project was that the “relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem services in urban areas are unclear, lack evidence and require new data and empirical research”.

She said such lack of clear understanding is not surprising, considering the nature of urban ecosystems, being situated in a highly modified landscape in a mix of man-made and natural environments.

Until now, she said, the dynamics and interaction between these two environments, which presumably have effects on both biodiversity and ecosystem service provisioning, remains largely unknown and, therefore, in their relationship to each other.

Nevertheless, she added that understanding the relationship between urban biodiversity and ecosystem service is a necessary task in an increasingly urbanized world, where 75 percent of the world population is projected to live in cities and their peri-urban surroundings in 2050, as reported in United Nations World Population Prospects 2012, and where the loss of habitats, resources and biodiversity is expected as a consequence.

In her recent study, Beroya-Eitner noted there were indications that only a couple of species are important in the delivery of crucial urban-ecosystem services, such as avoided urban-run off, carbon storage and sequestration and air-pollution reduction.

“For instance, only 11 species representing 15 percent of the total species in the park are needed to deliver 55 percent of the total avoided run-off. On the other hand, only 10 species [14 percent] are needed to deliver almost 70 percent, and 51 percent of carbon storage and carbon sequestration services of the park, respectively. Most of these species overlap, such that their union consist of only 15 species [21 percent], implying that only 15 species can be considered important in the delivery of much of the ES [ecosystem services] under consideration,” she said.

Green space, ecosystem service

Beroya-Eitner said there is a need to integrate plans to develop urban green spaces within an ecosystem service framework.

“I have heard of Quezon City’s Park Development Program [plan] to create green spaces but based on the documents I’ve seen, it is not yet framed within an ecosystem-service framework. In EarthThink, this is what we are advocating in its initial campaign to promote urban green space—that urban infrastructure development should be approached from an ecosystem service perspective,” she said.

Citing her recent study, titled “Urban Parks as Green Infrastructure: Assessment of the Flood Regulatory and Other Ecosystem Services in Kinuta Park, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan” for the United Nations University-Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, Beroya-Eitner said with the multiple benefits they provide, urban parks play an important role in making cities liveable, sustainable and resilient.

“This role will become even more important in the future in the face of climate change,” she added.

Flood, risk mitigation

In that study, focus was given to the assessment of the role of urban parks in flood-risk mitigation, flooding being the main problem in Setagaya where the study area, the Kinuta Park, is located.

Results show that urban parks can be a viable nature-based solution to flooding.

She noted, however,  such flood-regulatory service can be technologically replaced, and in ways that may even be more “efficient” in addressing the problem.

Because of this there’s a need to assess the other “cobenefits” of parks, which should be factored in.

“From a policy perspective, therefore, it is not easy to argue for the integration of urban parks in the general strategy for flood-risk reduction, particularly where competition for limited resources is high and continuous pressure from developers is present. For this reason, the other cobenefits of the park were also assessed, all of which should be factored in when weighing options for flood-risk mitigation.”

According to Beroya-Eitner, most parks—with “ecosystem services” as the technical term for the benefits people obtain from the environment, including avoided run-off, carbon sequestration, carbon storage, oxygen production and air-pollutant removal—should be assessed by conducting a tree survey.

Hence, Metro Manila, which is considered flood-prone, should look into the ecosystem service, particularly of flood-mitigation services not only of its urban parks, but other green spaces, too, before deciding in its building spree.

This article was originally posted on the www.businessmirror.com.ph

Job Opportunity – Technical Staff Team Leader for Admin and Finance

The UP CIDS is currently in need of a Technical Staff Team Leader for Administration and Finance for the “Nurturing Grassroots Change through Partnerships”, a joint project with the National Grid Corporation of the Philippines that aims to empower communities in six (6) barangays in the Philippines.

Update: Application for this position is now closed. Thank you!

 


 

UPCIDS hosts forum and book launch on ASEAN in line with PH chairmanship

 

In the midst of the chairmanship of the Philippines in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS), the UP Asian Center (UPAC), and the Development Academy of the Philippines (DAP) hosted a forum and book launch of The ASEAN Drama: Half a Century and Still Unfolding at the GT-Toyota Asian Center on May 17, 2017.

In attendance were the authors of The ASEAN Drama, namely: Dr. Filemon A. Uriarte, Jr., Dr. Temario C. Rivera, Dr. Jorge V. Tigno, Prof. Herman Joseph S. Kraft, Prof. Jose P. Tabbada, and Dr. Orlando S. Mercado; UP officials; representatives from government agencies and civil society organizations; and faculty and students.

UPAC Dean Dr. Joefe B. Santarita welcomed the guests while VP for Academic Affairs Dr. Ma. Cynthia Rose B. Bautista delivered a message from UP President Danilo L. Concepcion. Former Permanent Representative to the UN Lauro L. Baja, Jr. delivered his keynote speech titled “ASEAN: The Other Side of Midnight,” where he addressed the chairmanship of the Philippines in the 50th year of the ASEAN, and past and possible ways forward of the ASEAN. In the subsequent reaction Dr. Wilfrido Villacorta, former Ambassador to ASEAN and former ASEAN Deputy Secretary-Genera, gave his thoughts on pressing matters in the ASEAN and on the book The ASEAN Drama. An open forum followed after the speeches of the former ambassadors.

DAP President Dr. Elba S. Cruz was also in attendance and delivered a message of support. UPCIDS Executive Director Dr. Edna E.A. Co gave a brief background of the book project and each author gave quick summaries of their respective chapters. Book signing and cocktails capped the event. Dr. Jean Franco of the Department of Political Science served as the forum and book launch’s master of ceremonies.

The book, published by UPCIDS and DAP, is described as a “forthright scrutiny of ASEAN by academics and diplomatic practitioners.”

Copies of the book are available at the UPCIDS at PHP 400.00 each. For purchase inquiries, please contact Joseph Cruzado at [email protected]

Click here to view all photos

Forum and Book Launch – The ASEAN Drama: Half a Century and Still Unfolding

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS), in partnership with the UP Asian Center and the Development Academy of the Philippines (DAP), will host a forum and book launch, The ASEAN Drama: Half a Century and Still Unfolding, on 17 May 2017, 2 p.m. at the GT-Toyota Asian Center Auditorium, UP Diliman, Quezon City.

Ambassador Lauro L. Baja, Jr., former Permanent Representative to the United Nations for the Republic of the Philippines, will serve as the key resource person in the forum.

The ASEAN Drama: Half a Century and Still Unfolding contains articles with in-depth analyses of ASEAN matters such as human rights, economic integration, and identity and citizenship, which all contribute to broader ASEAN scholarship. The book will be available at the event at a special launch price of PHP 350.00.

As the venue has limited seating capacity, accommodation of guests will be on a first-come, first-served basis. It would be best to confirm your attendance ahead by calling the UP Center for Integrative Studies at 981-8500 loc. 4266 to 68 or by sending an email to [email protected].

The abstracts of the chapters in The ASEAN Drama: Half a Century and Still Unfolding may be viewed below:

UPSE turns over Public Policy Journal to Ayala Corp

The UP School of Economics (UPSE) presented the latest double-volume issue of the Public Policy Journal (PPJ) to the Ayala Corporation in a turnover ceremony held at UPSE Auditorium on Monday, April 24, 2017.

The double-volume issue of the PPJ, the official journal of the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS), is a compilation of papers presented in the Ayala Corporation–University of the Philippines School of Economics Economic Forums from 2014 to 2016. The issue features timely and insightful research on federalism and decentralization, tax reform, competition and regulation, and trade and agrarian reform.

Hosted by Prof. Joseph Capuno, one of the issue editors, the program began with a message from Prof. Emmanuel de Dios who provided a brief background of the UPSE-Ayala Corporation partnership. Prof. Orville Solon, current dean of UPSE and one of the authors in the issue, officially handed over of the publications with a message that highlighted the endeavor as a “public-private engagement that actually works.” In turn, the Ayala Corporation, represented by Managing Director John Philip Orbeta, received the PPJ and in a message hoped that the publication aids key decision makers in policymaking processes. The program ended with a photo opportunity and musical numbers from Tony Lambino, Ayala Corporation’s Head of Public Policy Unit, and Popo Suanes of the UPSE Alumni Association.

UPSE faculty, staff, alumni, and students, representatives from Ayala Corporation, and Dr. Edna Co and the publications unit from UPCIDS attended the ceremony.

To view the abstracts of the PPJ Volume 16 & 17, click here

To avail a copy of the journal, please contact Mr. Joseph Cruzado of UPCIDS by calling 981-8500 loc. 4266-68.

 

CIFAL PH hosted roundtable on women entrepreneurship and economic empowerment in ASEAN

CIFAL Philippines hosted Game-changers in Women Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment in the ASEAN Region: Roundtable on Best Practices in Policies, Access and Projects last 15 March 2017 in Pasay City, Manila.

The roundtable is part of the ASEAN women-related events for 2017 which aims to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment in the region. The event was attended by women entrepreneurs, and government and academe leaders.

Welcoming the participants, CIFAL Philippines and University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) Executive Director Dr. Edna Co, Philippine Commission on Women (PCW) Florita Villar, and ASEAN Women Entrepreneurs Network (AWEN) Chairperson Pacita “Chit” Juan stressed the importance of inclusiveness in economic development and strengthening Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) for women entrepreneurs.

Best practices on women’s economic empowerment at the level of policy, enabling environment, and access to finance and markets were discussed during the discussions. Dr. Carol Sobritchea of the University of the Philippines Asian Center, Philippine Women’s Economic Network (PHILWEN) Chairperson Ma. Aurora Geotina-Garcia, and ECHO Sustainable Initiatives (ECHOsi) Foundation President Jeanie Javelosa stressed the importance of collaboration between business and government in creating inclusive, sustainable, and viable industries.

Speakers also discussed best examples of innovative and game-changing businesses in ASEAN. Nadi-Ayu Technologies CEO Nadira Yusoff and DTI Assistant Regional Director and GREAT Women Project 2 National Coordinator Marcelina Alcantara shared capacity-building and partnership projects in Malaysia and the Philippines.

To cap off the discussions, UP Center for Women’s and Gender Studies Director Dr. Odine de Guzman presented a research and training module development proposal on further strengthening and enhancing ASEAN women’s economic empowerment in relation to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It aims to share and replicate best practices of women economic empowerment in ASEAN.

Other speakers in the roundtable discussion include Singaporean Ambassador to the Philippines Kok Li Peng, first woman and foreign minister in the ASEAN and SGV & Co. Senior Adviser Amb. Delia Albert Domingo, Bureau of Small and Medium Enterprise Development – Department of Trade and Industry (BSMED-DTI) Susan Mae Salonga, and Myanmar Women Entrepreneurs’ Association Advisor Ma Khine Zaw.

[NIGS LECTURE SERIES] Sea level rise and associated changes in surface temperature and the ice sheets

 

Among the most profound impacts of climate change is sea level rise since a large proportion of global population resides in coastal areas. The rate of sea level rise was for a long time estimated to be around 2 mm/year but in recent years the rate as measured by more advanced techniques, including the use of satellite radar altimeter systems, has increased to 3 mm/year. Much of the increase has been attributed to  the warming of the oceans and mass loss in the glaciers and ice sheets. The heat content of the oceans upo 700 m in depth and the global average of sea surface temperatures have been increasing significantly but the main concern has been the vulnerabilities of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the West Antarctic ice sheet which have a combined sea level equivalence of more than 13 meters. Recent studies have indicated changes in the stability of the ice sheets and glaciers that would make it possible for the rate of sea level rise to be a lot faster than the current rate. Also, the rate of warming in the Arctic has been observed to be three-times that of global warming rate in part because of ice-albedo feedback. Such warming has already resulted in dramatic changes in sea ice and snow cover and would make the Greenland ice even more vulnerable . An assessment of impacts especially in coastal areas, including those in the Philippines, will be presented.

 

 

CIDS Exec. Director chairs TWG to review Local Government Code – Book I

Executive Director Edna Estifania Co of UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS) formally chairs the technical working group (TWG) assigned to revisit Book I of the 1991 Local Government Code (LGC), as the Senate Committee on Local Government chaired by Sen. Sonny Angara kick starts the initiative to amend it.

At the organizational meeting held March 6 at the Senate, Dr. Co was tasked to lead the TWG that will review Book I of the LGC that contains General Provisions regarding the roles, functions, and conduct of local government units (LGUs).

The LGC is the landmark Philippine law, which empowered LGUs and legally devolved previously centralized powers and services such as healthcare.

Book II—Local Taxation and Fiscal Matters and Book III—Local Government Units of the LGC, will be reviewed separately by two other TWGs whose members also include key stakeholders such as representatives from government, academe,  research institutions, union of local authorities, and civil society organizations

As a research think-tank based in the academe, UPCIDS is expected to provide policymakers and other stakeholders evidence-based guidance leading to formulation of public policy.

As the LGC review progresses, Dr. Co is also keen to present UPCIDS’ Natural Region Framework (NRF) which outlines an alternative design of governance based on mapping and planning of natural endowments and vulnerability to risks among others, alongside socio-economic factors like poverty, income, etc. The NRF is the bedrock study supporting UPCIDS’ proposed revisions in the LGC and is currently on progress.

CIDS Presents Position Paper on Constitutional Change, Natural Region Framework in Public Hearings

The Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) recently participated in public hearings for two committees at the Senate of the Philippines, namely the Committee on Constitutional Amendments and Revision of Codes and the Committee on Local Government. The hearings, both held on February 22, 2017, saw the CIDS position paper on Constitutional Change and a preview of the study on the proposed Natural Region Framework.

Dr. Edna Co, Executive Director of CIDS, read the position paper of the Center on Constitutional Change and Amendments before Senator Franklin Drilon, Senator Leila de Lima, and Senator Ralph Recto, as well as other resource persons from the judiciary, academe, and political parties. The paper (which can be read below) identifies the concerns brought up in the debate on amending the Constitution and offers an alternative means toward resolving issues in the Consitution.

In the hearing organized by Committee on Local Government, Co shed light on the CIDS study on the Natural Region Framework, a type of development and governance planning based on the natural resources of the country’s regions. In attendance are Senator Sonny Angara, Senator Risa Hontiveros, and Senator JV Ejercito, while representatives from LGUs, NGOs, and academe, among others, also served as resource persons.

Read the CIDS Position Paper below:

Pascual reports accomplishments, thanks UP

UP outgoing President Alfredo Pascual enumerates his administration’s major achievements. Photo by Misael Bacani, UPSIO.

UP outgoing president, Alfredo Pascual, gave markers of his administration’s accomplishment and expressed his thanks to the UP community, his executive staff in particular, at the 5th President’s Toast on February 9, 2017, the eve of handing over the UP presidency to his successor.The event, which opened the Institute of Biology, UP Diliman to the UP community–saw student protesters, as well as chancellors giving thanks on behalf of their constituent universities through their gift of a Toym Imao sculpture. Representatives of UP sectors delivered testimonials to the outgoing UP president.

Pascual cited the administration’s two-pronged strategic plan aimed at academic and operational excellences to achieve a “one UP”. Enabling the administration’s successful implementation of this plan was its campaign for state funding, which saw the UP budget increase almost three-fold, from P5.4 billion in 2011 to P15.1 billion in 2016, mostly in the form of allocations for maintenance and other operating expenses (MOOE), and capital outlay, which amounted to P9 billion in a span of five years, according to the outgoing President.

Pascual’s presentation began with achievements in pursuing academic excellence.

These included enhancing access to UP by poorer segments of society through the online UPCAT application and the free online UPCAT review. Those passing the UPCAT were given better motivation to enroll and chances of staying in UP through a liberalized loan system and a streamlined Socialized Tuition System, including increased stipends, scholarships, and compensation for student assistants.

The roster of faculty was strengthened through increased incentives for the Balik-PhD program, sufficient grants to travel and pursue postgraduate courses abroad, multi-campus offering of doctoral programs, establishment of the One UP Professorial Chairs, and merit promotions.

Research activity flourished through huge investments in research and facilities. The banner projects included buildings and equipment for the Philippine Genome Center and the National Institutes of Health. Several research projects that had great impact nationally such as Project NOAH/DREAM-LIDAR resulted from the Enhanced Interdisciplinary Research Program.

Internationalization was jump-started with the shift in the academic calendar, international linkage programs such as MOVE UP and COOPERATE programs, and cross-border partnerships. These resulted in an influx of international professors, experts, and students, and active participation in an international network of universities. Programs were also benchmarked internationally, and open education was strengthened.

In terms of public service, Pascual reported on UP’s first integrated approach to disaster response and to voter information, technical assistance to other higher educational institutions, and the launch of a Resilience Institute and a public service television, TVUP. UP’s expansion in several industrial zones and growth areas also concretized its efforts at reaching target publics actively involved in economic development.

A major leap in operational excellence, meant to facilitate academic excellence, was the rolling out of eUP, an integrated operations and information system for all of UP. This included providing greater internet bandwidth and future-proofing of the fiber optic network.

The Pascual administration was also the first to create system-wide guidelines for environment-friendly operations, building and landscaping design, and land use.

UP outgoing President Alfredo Pascual expresses gratitude to each of his executive staff through citations. Photo by Misael Bacani, UPSIO.

Pascual expressed gratitude to each member of his executive staff through citations.

The program was also a chance for various UP sectors to deliver testimonials to the outgoing president. The event organizer, the UP outgoing vice president for Public Affairs, Dr. Edna Estifania Co, spoke of Pascual’s “deep concern” to improve the lot of employees, faculty, and students. Atty. Reynaldo Laserna, alumni representative, mentioned Pascual’s name along the “great” UP Alumni Association presidents who eventually became presidents of the University. Regent Alexis Mejia, staff representative, enumerated the various staff benefits received during Pascual’s term. Kevin Mark Gomez, student representative, spoke of the international exchange program of the administration which made possible his studies abroad. Dr. Agnes Rola, faculty representative, said the administration “leveled UP to become a socially-relevant university.”

UP Diliman Chancellor Michael Tan, representing the chancellors, gave brief testimonials he solicited from each chancellor. UP outgoing Vice President for Academic Affairs Gisela Concepcion, representing UP System officials, made the Gawad Pangulo choral competition an example of administration programs that cut across the system and sectors and generated goodwill and creativity. Commission on Higher Education Chair and UP Board of Regents Chair Patricia Licuanan thanked UP for helping CHED perform its role to lead the higher education sector.

Tenor Ramon Acoymo of the UP College of Music delivered a spiel and rendered his versions of “Can’t Help Falling in Love” and “Moonriver” in honor of Pascual.

Delivering a final word, Pascual repeated his trademark “Padayon UP” which harks on his vision of a great university: UP able to lead the country to prosperity in the globalized world.

Pascual earlier said his acceptance of the nomination to the UP presidency was motivated by his love for his alma mater, responsible for his career advancement and the development of the youth, which now includes his grandchildren.

 

This article was originally posted on the UP System website

Job Opportunity

The Center is looking for a Researcher that can start ASAP. The study will be about the Local Government Code of the Philippines.

Email your applications at [email protected] You can also contact the Center thru phone via 981-8500 local 4266, 4267 and 4268.

Update: Application for this position is now closed. Thank you!

QUEZON CITY – University of the Philippines faculty presented the findings of their research on migration during a public lecture at the UP Asian Center on Wednesday, February 1.

UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) and CIFAL Philippines fellows Prof. Clarinda Berja and Dr. Jean Franco, assisted by Prof. Jeremaiah Opiniano, shared the results of their respective year-long studies on migrants in the Central Visayas, and Filipino labor migration to the ASEAN.

Berja’s research, which supplements an earlier survey conducted in Region 6, generated data on overseas migrants, their families, and their access to government programs for overseas Filipinos in neighboring Central Visayas.

Meanwhile, Franco and Opiniano looked into the impact of the ASEAN Economic Community on labor mobility within the region.

Their presentations were followed by a response from Prof. Stella Go of the Philippine Migration Research Network.

The faculty also took questions from the audience, which was composed of members of the academe, international organizations, migration-related government agencies, and civil society groups.

Final versions of Berja and Franco’s research will be released in a publication later this year.

Click here to view all photos

5th President’s Toast: Pag-uulat at Pasasalamat ni Pangulong Alfredo E. Pascual

 

University of the Philippines President Alfredo E. Pascual will deliver his end of term report and express his gratitude to the members of the academic community at the 5th President’s Toast: Pag-uulat at Pasasalamat, on 9 February 2016, 9:00 a.m. at the Institute of Biology Auditorum, National Science Complex, UP Diliman, Quezon City.

As the venue has limited seating capacity, accommodation of guests will be on a first come, first served basis. It would be best to confirm your attendance ahead by calling the Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs at 981-8500 loc. 2507 or the UP Center for Integrative Studies at 981-8500 loc. 4266 to 68.

This article was originally posted on the UP System website

Migration Research Lectures

 

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies and CIFAL Philippines invite everyone to the Migration Research Lectures, a presentation of research projects undertaken by UP CIDS fellows in 2016.

Prof. Clarinda Berja will share the findings of a survey of migrants conducted in the Central Visayas, and Dr. Jean Franco and Prof. Jeremaiah Opiniano will present their paper on Filipino labor migration to the ASEAN.

Registration for the lecture starts at 1:00 p.m.

 

Call for Papers: National Conference on Natural Capital Accounting

The National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) in collaboration with The World Bank will hold a National Conference on Natural Capital Accounting (NCA) to present what has been accomplished and arouse greater interest on NCA towards paving its way for its mainstreaming in development agenda. More specifically, the conference aims to achieve the following objectives:

  • improve the scientific and policy aspects of natural capital accounting in the Philippines through exchange of knowledge, insights and experience among policymakers, scientists, practitioners and advocates;
  • provide a platform to disseminate results of researches and current undertakings among key actors in NCA and related subject matter;
  • collate and synthesize available technical analyses relevant for the implementation of natural capital accounting in the Philipines, highlight major issues and concerns, identify data gaps and impact highways, and discuss policy directions at local and national levels; and
  • identify effective modes of collaboration towards further strengthening capabilities in NCA and other releated methodologies and tools.

Papers addressing one of the following themes are requested:

  • Integrated frameworks and tools in natural capital accounting
  • Re-thinking the importance of natural capital
  • Financing, investment and natural capital accounting
  • Data and data management in natural accounting

Deadline of submission for paper and poster presentations will be on 31 January 2017. Notification of selected abstracts (both for paper and poster presentation) will be made on 14 February 2017. Full paper of selected abstracts, together with revised abstracts (for those with edits of comments), and poster presentation will have to be submitted on or before 28 February 2017.

Abstracts and full papers must be submitted to:
[email protected]
 or [email protected], with copy furnished to [email protected]

See the concept note, call for papers, and abstract and full paper format below.

For other details, please refer to www.neda.gov.ph or www.wavespartnership.org.

 

National Conference on NCA

Abstract & Paper Format NCA

NCA Concept Note

UP CIDS releases “Book of Abstracts” for 2015-2016 Researches

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The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) published in its website a Book of Abstracts to catalogue 25 funded researches for the years 2015-2016.

The Book of Abstracts provides a snapshot of all UP CIDS’ completed and ongoing studies that span a wide range of topics from “bivalve mariculture” and “mother tongue-based education” to “weather warnings in social media” and “crime modeling.”  Further, it is subdivided into four thematic areas: environment, agriculture, and mariculture; disaster management and resilience; health, education, and communication; and management and local governance.

Full abstracts for 20 researches are available, while five other and ongoing studies were included for reference.

From here on, under the instruction of its Exec. Director Edna Co, UP CIDS is set to massively disseminate the Book of Abstracts to policy makers, research councils and networks, state universities and colleges, and other academic and research-oriented institutions, in order to diffuse the knowledge, findings, and policy recommendations brought together by UP’s faculty members with the aid of the University’s financial and other forms of support.

The Center also intends to release a compendium of the research papers by next year.

The publication of the Book of Abstracts, among many other initiatives, is a testament to UP CIDS’ commitment to purposively bridge and engage experts from the academe and policy-making quarters to arrive at sound and evidence-based policies drawn from a multidisciplinary lens.

To view the Book of Abstracts, click here.

UP lays down “green” options in pursuit of operational excellence

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UP President Alfredo E. Pascual

Duty-bound to contribute to sustainable development, the University of the Philippines (UP) convened its system officials and stakeholders at the Green UP Summit on December 6-7, 2016 at the University Hotel in UP Diliman.

The UP Office of the Vice President for Administration, Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs, and Center for Integrative and Development Studies worked together to make this intimate yet historic gathering of about 120 representatives from all over the UP system possible.

Owing to President Alfredo E. Pascual’s vision of operational excellence, UP initiated for the first time the integration of UP’s various green programs aimed at developing strategic options for the national university. This is also part of the UP community’s pursuit of environmental sustainability and resilience to climate change impacts and disaster risks.

Envisioned as a program that brings together researches, technologies, and best practices of all UP constituent units (CUs), the summit featured a series of presentations that revolved around the theme, “Catalyzing Climate Change Resilience and Environmental Sustainability, 2017 and Beyond.” This included notable projects such as Project SARAI (Smarter Approaches to Reinvigorate Agriculture as Industry in the Philippines), MODECERA (Monitoring and Detection of Ecosystems Changes for Enhancing Resilience and Adaptation in the Philippines, Resilient Seas Program, Project NOAH (Nationwide Operational Assessment Hazards), Resilience Institute, UP-Resilience Web Portal, Sustainable Energy Project, UPPEG (UP Program for Environmental Governance), Green UP Baguio, and UP Cebu’s UI Green Metric among others.

Experts from different UP CUs served as resource persons during the event. They include Project SARAI Program Leader Dr. Maria Victoria O. Espaldon and MODECERA Program Leader Dr. Rex Victor O. Cruz of UP Los Baños. The presenters from UP Diliman were Resilient Seas Program Leader Dr. Porfirio Alexander M. Aliño, Project NOAH Executive Director Dr. Alfredo Mahar Francisco A. Lagmay, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Resilience Institute Executive Director Dr. Benito M. Pacheco, UP-Resilience Web Portal Project Leader Dr. Kristoffer B. Berse, Sustainable Energy Project Program Leader Dr. Mili-Ann M. Tamayao, UP College of Engineering’s Prof. Ferdinand G. Manegdeg, Institute of Civil Engineering’s Dr. Maria Antonia A. Tanchuling, College of Science Dean Dr. Jose Maria P. Balmaceda, and UPPEG Director Atty. Mark Anthony M. Gamboa. Completing the summit’s roster of speakers were UP Baguio Department of Communication Chairperson Prof. Cecilia S. Abalos, UP Cebu Vice Chancellor for Administration Dr. Leahlizbeth A. Sia, and  Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technologies Executive Director Engr. Roberto Verzola.

Also gracing the event were Department of Environment and Natural Resources Undersecretary for Legal Affairs Atty. Maria Paz G. Luna, Department of Energy Policy and Planning Bureau Director Carmencita A. Bariso, and Climate Change Commission Deputy Executive Director Romell Antonio Cuenca.

On its second day, the summit hosted parallel workshops on Academic Programs, Research Programs, Policy and Public Affairs, Renewable Energy, Water Management, and Environment to help articulate desired green goals for the university.

Department of Agriculture Undersecretary for Policy and Planning Segfredo R. Serrano and Department of Budget and Management National Capital Region Director Ruby R. Esteban witnessed and served as reactors to the presentation of workshop outputs.

Assistant Vice President for Administration Prof. Nestor Rañeses deems the summit has succeeded in bringing about the interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary character of Green UP. He said the wisdom and practices elicited during the event may serve as platforms for Green UP in 2017.

Meanwhile, Vice President for Public Affairs Dr. Edna Estifania Co believes that the workshop outputs should be reviewed to determine crucial points that could be picked up for further action under the Green UP program.

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Green UP Summit on December 6-7, 2016

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The University of the Philippines through the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS), Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs (OVPPA), and Office of the Vice President for Administration (OVPA) is bringing together representatives from its constituent units to hold the first Green UP Summit entitled “Catalyzing Climate Change Resilience and Environmental Sustainability, 2017 and Beyond” on December 6 to 7, 2016 at the University Hotel, UP Diliman, Quezon City.

 Through Green UP, the University of the Philippines is duty-bound to contribute to sustainable development and social responsibility by crafting new strategic options aligned with desired national goals. Green UP aims to contribute policy options across the system, including green building standards, energy audits, replacement of equipment to improve energy efficiency, water and solid waste management, monitoring of building maintenance standards, environmental management and other strategic initiatives in relation to climate change, disaster risk reduction and sustainability.

Sustainable Energy Talks: Philippine Nuclear Energy

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“The UP Sustainable Energy Program is inviting you to the “Sustainable Energy Talks”, which aims to enable discussion among academics, government, industry, and the public about sustainability issues, innovations, and key topics in the energy sector such as Technology, Market, Policy, and Behavior.

On November 28, 2016, we will be talking about Philippine Nuclear Energy with a focus discussion on Overview of How Nuclear Energy Works, The BNPP History and Current State, and Philippine Nuclear Energy: Economic and System Evaluation of BNPP .

Fill in this online registration and confirm your attendance:

 

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UP CIDS China and Strategic Studies Program holds 2nd Katipunan Conference

Last October 20 to 21, 2016, representatives from the government, civil society and the academe attended the 2nd Katipunan Conference entitled, “Philippine Strategic Environment: New Direction, New Challenges” held at the UP-Law Center. The Katipunan Conference is one of the main components of the China and Strategic Studies Program of the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) and is co-sponsored by the UP Institute for Maritime Affairs and the Law of the Sea (UP IMLOS). It aims to discuss the key geopolitical, economic and socio-cultural issues confronting Philippine-China relations and its impact on a national, regional and international level.

Opening the said conference was Professor Jose Wendell Capili, Assistant Vice President for Public Affairs of the UP System. Professor Capili highlighted the importance of the China and Strategic Studies Program which is to examine the current trends in the security landscape of Southeast Asia to predict its future trajectories.

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China and Strategic Studies Program Head Prof Tina S. Clemente

Professor Tina S. Clemente, the project head of the China and Strategic Studies program, provided the rationale, a short history and an overview of its components. She emphasized the efforts of the China and Strategic Studies team to institutionalize and develop the said program these past two years. The program has 3 objectives namely: (1) To maintain a multidisciplinary and multisectoral approach to practical studies of international relations, (2) To develop dialogue and sustain linkages with Chinese academics to come up with principled solutions to conflict resolution and (3) To create a network of government, private and civil society individuals interested and committed to the field of strategic studies and development.

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(From L-R) Professor Jay Batongbacal, Mr. Aaron Jed Rabena, Prof. Chester Cabalza and Elliot Grieco, the moderator for the panel on geopolitical trends

Professor Jay L. Batongbacal, director of UP Institute for Maritime Affairs and the Law of the Sea, along with Dr. Aaron Jed Rabena, a fellow at the Philippine Council for Foreign Relations and Associate Professor Chester Chester B. Cabalza from the National Defense College of the Philippines opened the panel discussions of the first day with a geopolitical scan at a global, regional and local level. Following up on his discussion at the previous Katipunan Conference, professor Jay elaborated on the several recent geopolitical trends and their implications for the country. Such trends include the emergence of three competing economic blocs (USA, China and Russia-led blocs), a rise in anti-globalization sentiments (Trump phenomena, Brexit) and most notably, the “seemingly 180 degree turn of Philippine foreign policy” or the “Philippine pivot to China”. In his discussion, Dr. Rabena argued that the regional competition between the United States and China can be analyzed through their influence on international institutions, wherein we can see most clearly the interplay between politics and economics. In concluding the first panel discussion, professor Cabalza commented that the Philippines is at the crossroads of this geopolitical rivalry between the two superpowers and proposed the probable implications of a Philippine pivot to China.

The second panel zeroed in on the economic issues confronting Philippines-China relations. Philippine Science High School teacher Charles De Guzman’s presentation on the controversial Joint Maritime Seismic Undertaking project between the two aforementioned countries during Arroyo’s term should serve as a warning for the current Duterte administration to uphold transparency and accountability with Chinese Official Development Assistance (ODA)s. Dr. Michael Fabinyi of the University of Technology Sydney discussed the environmental and economic implications of the maritime disputes on Philippines-China trade. Dr. Tina Clemente from the UP Asian Center concluded the panel presentation with an extensive discussion on current challenges in our trade and investment portfolio with China, noting the large gap between the Arroyo and Aquino administrations. The open forum that followed raised a lot of questions regarding the readiness of our institutions for the recent outflow of Chinese ODAs as a result of Duterte’s state visit to China and the rationality behind China’s foreign policy to developing states.

The last panel for the first day explored the critical security and development issues posed by the disputes. Lucio Pitlo, a lecturer at the Ateneo De Manila University, highlighted the growing political competition between the United States and China does not bode well for ASEAN and the Philippines. Dr. Roli Talampas of UP Asian Center discussed a relatively unexamined component of our regional strategic environment, the quality of our coastal and port development. His research concludes that China’s aggressive behavior and Southeast Asian countries’ poor coastal and port governance are complementary to the overall deterioration of the marine environment.

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Dr. Banlaoi from the Philippine Institute for Peace, Violence and Terrorism Research

The second day highlighted particular policy considerations that are reflective of the changing security environment in the region. Dr. Banlaoi of the Philippine Institute for Peace, Violence and Terrorism Research opened the discussion with the possible policy options of the Duterte administration with China and the United States. Gabriel Hondrada of the Office of Naval Strategic Studies and Charithie Joaquin of the National Defense College of the Philippines explored two divergent implications of an emerging Chinese military: (1) an accelerated arms race among Southeast Asian countries, the former and (2) potentially stronger institutional ties within the military through international military educational exchange opportunities, the latter.

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(From L-R) Prof. Baviera, Ms. Kaye Clemente and Prof. Batongbacal during the last panel discussion on role of think tanks in the Philippine strategic environment

The last panel provided a necessary discussion on the role of think tanks in the strategic environment led by Professor Jay Batongbacal (UP IMLOS), Professor Aileen Baviera (Asia Pacific Pathways to Progress Foundation Inc.) and Kaye Clemente (Asian Development Research Institute).

The culmination of the 2nd Katipunan Conference resulted in a renewed call for stronger linkages and partnerships among local and global think tanks in the field of strategic studies to mitigate the fast changing security needs and demands of the country and the region as a whole.

UP commends OVPAA projects in 4th President’s Toast

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UP President Alfredo E. Pascual at the 4th President’s Toast

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) hosted the 4th President’s Toast on October 28, 2016 to celebrate the accomplishments of the Emerging Interdisciplinary Research (EIDR) and Balik PhD programs of the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs (OVPAA).

Held at Ang Bahay ng Alumni, the program’s highlight was the presentation of successful projects by selected proponents of both programs:

EIDR Program
1. Dr. Agnes Rola (UP Los Baños) – Towards Good Water Governance for Development: A Multi-Case Analysis
2. Dr. Helena Yap (UP Diliman) – Social-Ecological Resilience on Different Spatial and Temporal Scales
3. Dr. Leonardo Estacio, Jr. (UP Manila) – Drug Use Behavioral Health Among Adolescents in Metro Manila

Balik PhD Program
1. Dr. Francis Paraan (UP Diliman) – Quantum Entanglement in Low-Dimensional Systems: Quantum Spin Chains and Continuum Systems
2. Dr. Magdaleno Vasquez, Jr. (UP Diliman) – Charged Particle System Development for Modification of Polymeric Surfaces
3. Dr. Cecilia Conaco (UP Diliman) – Exploring Transcriptome Dynamics in Marine Organism in Response to Environmental Challenges

In their presentations, the program grantees shared the results and achievements of their respective projects which include publications, training opportunities for graduate students, and reactions from the community and other stakeholders of their researches.

UP President Alfredo E. Pascual lauded these projects and the two OVPAA programs for their successful pursuit of academic excellence and public service and for their contribution to knowledge and research.

Undersecretary Rommel Garcia of the Dangerous Drugs Board also graced the event and commended the projects.

Click here to learn more about the EIDR Program and here for the Balik PhD Program.


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The 4th President’s Toast

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The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) will host the Fourth President’s Toast on 28 October 2016, Friday, 2:00 to 4:00 in the afternoon at the Bahay ng Alumni, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City.

The Fourth President’s Toast is a salutation to significant projects and achievements initiated by the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs (OVPAA), namely the Emerging Interdisciplinary Research (EIDR) and the Balik-PhD programs.

For queries, please contact CIDS through the following e-mail addresses: [email protected], Ms. Lea Diño at [email protected], and Ms. Jori Pamintuan at [email protected].

Learn more about EIDR and the Balik-PhD Recruitment Programs

This article was originally posted on the UP System website.

UPCIDS held “Pinoy Round” to hear various federal proposals

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The last leg of the series of round table discussions on “Federalism:  Facts, Myths, Opportunities and Challenges” heard federal proposals from the Movement for Federal Philippines, the Local Government Development Foundation, and the Kilos Pederal sa Pagbabago in an RTD held on 12 October 2016 from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the Board of Regents Room, Quezon Hall, UP Diliman.   Each of the invited resource persons to present their federal proposals was allotted 20 minute to speak.

To set the context of this discussion, Prof. Miriam Coronel-Ferrer of the UP Political Science Department presented a talk on the current bills and resolutions filed in this 17th Congress with regard to the move to amend or revise the Constitution also known as Cha-Cha via such modes as ConCon, ConAss, ConCom, and ConAm.  She unbundled all these legislative measures in a neatly done content analysis thereby showing the various streams of thought that politicians have in mind if there will be an amendment or revision of the Constitution.

Dean Joe-Santos Bisquerra of the Movement for Federal Philippines started off with basic concepts, then political concepts of federalism, and a comparison of various federal specimens.  He anchored his thesis on the poverty problem and advanced the view of a corporatist framework for local governments as the best mode.  In effect, he vied for competitive type of federalism for the Philippines.  Also, invoking such fave legal principle, ‘salus populi est suprema lex’, Bisquerra opted for grassroots leadership in a proposed shift to federalism.

On the other hand, Atty. Aris Albay, Chairman of the Kilos Pederal sa Pagbabago batted for a cooperative type of federalism wherein national government and regional states intermingle in policies and sharing of powers to include concurrent powers.  Also he batted for dual federalism where such powers between levels of government (i.e. central-local) are specifically delineated.  However, under his proposal, there shall only be a central Federal Government with five regional state governments based on economic viability.

For his part, Prof. Edmund Tayao of Local Government Development Foundation gave a general update on studies they are into on federalism but largely adoptive of the Nene Pimentel earlier proposal on federalism.  He mentioned that his group already plans to start similar round table discussions to hear from various sectors, stakeholders, experts, and advocates.

UPCIDS researchers Mr. Michael Eric Castillo and Mr. Primer Pagunuran served as moderators to this round table discussion.

 

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CIFAL Philippines Officially Launched in Quezon City to Offer Training on Migration, Gender Equality in the Asia-Pacific region

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Participants of the opening ceremony

29 September 2016, Quezon City, Philippines – With the objective of expanding its training activities on migration and development at local level, UNITAR in partnership with the University of the Philippines launched the International Training Centre for Authorities and Leaders (CIFAL) Philippines, which will be based in Quezon City, Metro Manila.

CIFAL Philippines will be hosted by the University of the Philippines (UP) under the auspices of its Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS).  President of the UP, Dr. Alfredo E. Pascual expressed his high satisfaction with the marriage of his institution, the only national university in the Philippines, with a very practically-oriented training centre of the UN on issues of such high importance to his county and his region.  “I fully endorse a mission centered on “developing the capacities of individuals, organizations and institutions to enhance global decision-making and to support country-level action for shaping a better future”, he gleefully stated.

Dr. Edna E.A. Co, Director of CIFAL Philippines remarked: “UP is now UN”, with a CIFAL Philippines that will center its work around mentoring local authorities and other stakeholders in the Philippines and the greater Asia-Pacific region on pressing global issues namely: international migration, gender equality and achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Senator Risa Hontiveros of the Philippines highlighted during the ceremony “particular attention should be brought to bear with regard to the protection of women migrants, where “local agencies are in a unique position to understand trends, and to design appropriate responses to them”.

Partners of the CIFAL Philippines include the Commission on Filipinos Overseas (CFO), the Commission on Human Rights, the Scalabrini Migration Center, ILO, IOM, and UNDP’s Joint Migration and Development Initiative (JMDI).

Dr. Alfredo E. Pascual, President of UP, and Dr. Colleen Thouez, Senior Advisor with UNITAR, sign the official partnership agreement formally establishing CIFAL Philippines.

Dr. Alfredo E. Pascual, President of UP, and Dr. Colleen Thouez, Senior Advisor with UNITAR, sign the official partnership agreement formally establishing CIFAL Philippines.

 

This article was originally posted on the UNITAR Website.

UP, UNITAR launch CIFAL Philippines

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The Centre International de Formation des Autorités et Leaders (CIFAL) Philippines, the Asia-Pacific hub of the CIFAL Global Network was launched on September 29, 2016 at Novotel Manila during the 3rd President’s Toast,an event that celebrates landmark UP initiatives.

The establishment of CIFAL Philippines in UP is the result of the University’s partnership with the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). It is the sixteenth and latest addition to the UNITAR program.

The 3rd President’s Toast was hosted by the Quezon City government as part of the 3rd Global Mayoral Forum, a two-day UNITAR-supported event which it also hosted.

The Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) is UP’s lead unit in CIFAL Philippines. As the University’s multidisciplinary policy research center, CIDS is expected to harness the expertise of UP in the areas of migration and development, gender equality, and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals for CIFAL.

According to UNITAR’s website, the CIFAL Global Network’s goal “is to strengthen the capacities of government officials and civil society leaders, thus empowering them to advance sustainable development.” The centers, therefore, are charged with training local and regional leaders and organizations and “serve as hubs for the exchange of knowledge amongst government officials, the private sector and civil society.”

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In his message, UP President Pascual said that the partnership with UNITAR strengthens UP’s regional and global character. In addition, the University’s public service mission is in consonance with UNITAR’s objective “to develop capacities of individuals, organizations and institutions to enhance global decision-making and to support country-level action for shaping a better future.”

Toward the end of his speech, Pascual declared, “UP stands united with UNITAR and the CIFAL Global Network in recognizing the urgency to effectively address the challenges that hinder governments and societies from achieving inclusive growth and sustainable development.”

In her keynote address, Senator Risa Hontiveros  said that CIFAL Philippines’ areas of focus are issues that are important to her and are part of her legislative agenda. She talked about the challenges that stem from migration and mobility, such as racism, xenophobia, public health, integration, and peaceful cohabitation, among others. Hontiveros emphasized the mandate of “policy formulators” such as herself—”to safeguard human rights.”

Other speakers at the event included: former Commission on Filipinos Overseas Chair Imelda Nicolas, who said that the new center will rely heavily on the Filipino experience of migration; UNITAR Senior Training and Research Advisor Colleen Thouez, who expressed appreciation of UP’s partnership; UN Resident Coordinator in Serbia Irena Vojáčková-Sollorano, representing UN Resident Coordinator in the Philippines Ola Almgren, who called the establishment of CIFAL Philippines “timely” because of the increasing phenomenon of migration and the Filipino diaspora; and UP VP for Public Affairs, CIFAL Philippines Director, and CIDS Executive Director Edna Co, who remarked, “UP is now UN.” Co was also a speaker at the 3rd Global Mayoral Forum, where she talked about the critical role of universities in knowledge networks, specifically in the attainment of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals through local leadership.

This article was originally posted on the UP System website.

 

Job Opportunity – POSITION CLOSED

The Center is looking for a Full-Time Research Assistant for MWSS Project that can start ASAP.

Please check the qualifications below. Clearance from previous work is an additional requirement (if previously employed).

UPDATE: Application for this job is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

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UP CIDS presents the “National Marine Policy Review and Strategic Direction” in a Public Hearing

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On September 15, 2016, the Center presented the “National Marine Policy Review and Strategic Direction”, a study

focused on the review and update of the 1994 National Marine Policy and the formulation of the National Marine

Strategy. The study was discussed during a Public Hearing conducted by the Senate Committee on Agriculture and

Food, jointly with the Committee on Civil Service, Government Reorganization and Professional Regulation, and

Finance. The hearing was organized to provide a venue for a deliberation on the possible creation of a separate

department focused on the management of marine resources of the Philippines. The Center’s position was presented

by Dr. Edna Co, Executive Director of UP CIDS, and Usec. Jose Luis Alano of the National Coast Watch Council.

They emphasized on the potential of creating a Department of Marine Affairs and the necessary institutional

arrangements required for its establishment.

 

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The 2nd Katipunan Conference “Philippine Strategic Environment: New Directions, New Challenges”

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DATE: Thursday, October 20 to Friday, October 21, 2016.
TIME: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM on Oct. 20, 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM on Oct. 21
VENUE: 1st Floor Bocobo Hall, UP Law Complex, University of the Philippines Diliman.

Organized by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies
China/Strategic Studies Program (CIDS-C/SSP)
and Institute of Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea (IMLOS)

The 2nd Katipunan Conference, entitled “Philippine Strategic Environment: New Directions, New Challenges” convenes experts and specialists from government, the academe and the industry sector to discuss the latest issues that impact the bilateral and regional dynamics of Philippine-China relations.

Taking into consideration the latest developments regarding our country’s security, trade and geo-politcal dynamics, the conference scans the issues from multiple perspectives. The 2nd Katipunan Conference aims to deepen and nuance the insights from last year’s conference, to produce practical and informed policy options and decision-making aids for government agencies and officials.

This one and half day event is open to the public and free of charge. We highly encourage you to share this event to your students and colleagues.

Register now! Slots for participants are limited. To register, please sign up by clicking on this link. Deadline for registration is on Thursday, October 17, 2016.  You may also check out our FB Event Page here.

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Statement from the Office of the Secretary of the University and of the Board of Regents on UP Presidency Candidates

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On 23 September 2016, the UP Board of Regents received the nominations for the following for the position of UP President:

  1. Consolacion R. Alaras
  2. Danilo L. Concepcion
  3. Gisela P. Concepcion
  4. Prospero E. De Vera III
  5. Rowena Cristina L. Guevara
  6. Orlando S. Mercado
  7. Benito M. Pacheco
  8. Roger D. Posadas
  9. Caesar A. Saloma
  10. Michael L. Tan

At a special meeting of the Board of Regents held on 1 October 2016, the Board conducted a preliminary screening and evaluation of the nominees based solely on the following minimum requirements: 1) holder of a Master’s degree; doctorate preferred; 2) substantial academic experience at the tertiary level; 3) should be able to serve the full term of six (6) years before reaching the age of 70; and 4) no conviction for administrative and criminal offenses. Based on this, the Board then unanimously accepted the nominations of the following as candidates for the UP Presidency:

  1. Danilo L. Concepcion
  2. Gisela P. Concepcion
  3. Prospero E. De Vera III
  4. Rowena Cristina L. Guevara
  5. Benito M. Pacheco
  6. Caesar A. Saloma

Four (4) of the ten (10) nominees were not included in the list of candidates for the UP Presidency due to the fact that they did not meet the minimum requirement that a candidate “should be able to serve the full term of six (6) years before reaching the age of 70.

The Board of Regents’ unanimous decision to uphold this requirement, after due deliberations, was based on the following legal grounds:

  • Under Republic Act No. 9500 (the UP Charter of 2008), Section (j), the Board of Regents is given the power to elect the University President based on standards and guidelines set by the Board of Regents itself. Clearly, the Board of Regents is expressly granted the power to set the standards or requirements in electing the UP President.
  • The UP Charter of 2008 is silent on the age requirement or limit for the UP President.

The old UP Charter (Act 1870), likewise, was also silent on the age limit for the UP President. Yet the Board of Regents was empowered then as now to set the age limit for the position, which it did set at 70 years old in 1961 by way of a Board Resolution at its 686th meeting held on 14 June 1961. The age limit of 70 years old now forms part of UP’s University Code.

  • The age limit of 70 years old has been in existence since 14 June 1961. Such age limit was last observed during the time of UP President Francisco Nemenzo who was elected for a term of 6 years (from 6 August 1999 to 5 August 2005) but had to resign upon reaching the age of 70 on 9 February 2005, a few months before the expiration of his term.
  • There are general legislations that provide for the age limit of 70 years old. For instance, RA 8282 (the Higher Education Modernization Act of 1997) states that the term of the President of a state college or university may be extended beyond the age of retirement (65 years old)but not later than the age of 70 years old.
  • Regarding the requirement for serving the full term of six (6) years, the UP Charter of 2008 (RA 9500) provides the basis. Section 13 (j) of the UP Charter clearly states, among others, the Powers and Duties of the Board of Regents, as follows:

Section 13 (j): “To elect the President of the University for a single term of six (6) years following a process of democratic consultation with the university community based on standards and guidelines set by the Board. In the event of a vacancy, the Board shall elect a President who shall serve a full term.” 

  • In addition, Section 14 (paragraph 2) of the UP Charter provides:

Section 14 (paragraph 2): “The President of the University shall be appointed by the Board and shall serve for a single term of six (6) years.”

For inquiries, please contact:

Edna Estifania A. Co, DPA
Vice President for Public Affairs
09985898022

This article was originally posted on the UP System website.

Book on legislative accountability launched

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“Isyu ngayon ang graft and corruption sa gobyerno. Pero sino ang ating sisingilin? Paano natin sila sisingilin (Graft and corruption in the government is a hot-button issue today. But whom do we hold accountable? How do we hold them accountable)?” said Atty. Marilyn Barua Yap, former secretary general in the House of Representatives, in her message at the launch of her book Accountability in Congress at UP Balay Kalinaw on September 22, 2016. The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS) and the UP Law Center sponsored the event.

In attendance were family, friends, and colleagues of Atty. Yap, including Speaker Prospero C. Nograles, Speaker Feliciano Belmonte, Jr., Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” R. Marcos, Jr., Senator Sherwin T. Gatchalian, and Ilocos Norte Governor Imee Marcos.

Deputy Secretary General Atty. Arlene C. Dada-Arnaldo delivered the program’s invocation while UP College of Law Dean Atty. Danilo L. Concepcion and UP Vice President for Public Affairs and UPCIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co delivered introductory messages. Dr. J. Prosero E. De Vera of the Commission on Higher Education gave the closing remarks. Atty. Dot Gancayco served as the program’s master of ceremonies.

Accountability in Congress, based on Atty. Yap’s dissertation at the UP National College of Public Administration and Governance, introduces a framework for accountability in the legislature as well as systems and mechanisms for the framework’s implementation and enforcement. It also presents a Legislative Performance Report Card which features the following as performance indicators: local bills authored, national bills authored, resolutions authored, attendance, plenary participation, nominal/roll care vote on bills, and nominal/roll call vote on joint resolutions.

The book is considered a pioneering work in the literature of legislative accountability.

Copies of the book will be made available at the UPCIDS. For purchase inquiries, please contact Joseph Cruzado at [email protected]

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Click here to view all photos

 

Job Opportunities

The Center is looking for a Publications Assistant for Research and Researcher-Writer for Migration and Development that can start ASAP.

Please check the qualifications below. Clearance from previous work is an additional requirement (if previously employed).

UPDATE: Application for these jobs is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

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Argentina, Australia and France featured in RTD on federalism

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The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) hosted the fourth installment of the “Federalism: Facts, Myths, Opportunities, and Challenges,” a series of round table discussions, and featured the political systems of Argentina, Australia, and France at the Executive House in UP Diliman last September 8, 2016.

Ambassador Roberto Bosch presented the motivations behind federalization of Argentina and the various aspects and features of federalism in the Latin American country, such as coparticipación federal (joint participation), a system that puts forward a balanced distribution of taxes. Another highlight from the Argentinian presentation is the enumeration of powers of the independent federal powers, namely preserved by the provinces, delegated to the Federal Government, concurrent, shared, exceptional, and forbidden.

Ms. Georgia Lovell, representing the Australian Embassy, shared the features of the Australian federal government like its powers and fiscal arrangements, among others. In concluding her presentation, Lovell stated that remembering the end goals is important and that a constitution, especially in its formation, must represent the country’s proud history but also encapsulate the hopes for the future.

Though France is not a federal nation, Mr. Laurent Legodec of the French Embassy participated in the discussion by shedding light on France’s constitution, which he described as a hybrid and flexible one that sufficiently maintains checks and balances. Also notable in the French presentation is the observance of the subsidiarity principle in the decentralization of France, where “social and political issues are dealt with at the most immediate level that is consistent with their resolution.”

Guests from UP, government institutions, and civil society groups engaged the speakers through questions on symmetry and asymmetry, local government codes, conflict resolution, creation of territories, and power limitation.

The round table discussions aims to take a closer look on different models of federalist systems to assist in making sound and prudent decisions with regard to Philippine governance. To read about the past discussions, click on the corresponding links below:

RTD 1: Germany and India
RTD 2: Switzerland
RTD 3: Spain

 

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Click here to view all photos

PAEP’s Open Letter to the UP community

5 September 2016

 

OPEN LETTER FROM THE U.P. PRESIDENT TO THE U.P. COMMUNITY

re the 25 August 2016 incident at the Board Room in Quezon Hall

 

Dear Members of the UP Community:

Last 25 August, as you may have already heard, a group identifying themselves to be students mainly from UP Los Baños and UP Diliman stormed into the UP Board Room in Quezon Hall shortly after the adjournment of the Board of Regents (BOR) meeting, but with several Regents still around. The students came to decry, among other issues, the alleged “failure” of the new computerized registration system, known as the Student Academic Information System (SAIS), during the registration period in UP Los Baños this semester.

While I definitely do not condone the disruptions the said group caused, I can understand the reasons for their distress. Evidently, information on what we are doing to address UP’s perennial registration problems and improve administrative efficiency has not been adequately disseminated.

I have decided to write this letter not only to those students who came to the BOR for “answers”, but also to the University community at large, whose members deserve to know the pertinent facts behind these issues.

At the heart of the protesters’ complaints was the SAIS, which is an integral part of the eUP program we launched in 2012 to integrate and harmonize the information and communication technology infrastructure across all constituent universities (CUs) of the UP System. The eUP program has, in addition to SAIS, other key information systems covering human resources; financial management; supply, procurement and campus management; and executive information.

The eUP program also has other components, such as, upgrading of fiber optic networks, increasing bandwidth for faster Internet connectivity, and providing computers and other equipment to our various campuses—things which the University needs regardless of what information systems we implement and which accounted for about 70% of the P750 million spent on the eUP program.

SAIS was specifically designed to streamline such familiar and often tediously complicated processes as admission, enlistment, cross-registration, advising, study program planning, shifting, transferring, and alumni tracking, as well help faculty members and academic units do longer-term planning to meet future demand for courses. SAIS is meant to eventually banish the long queues that have remained an embarrassing hallmark of the UP registration system in this digital age.

We agreed to adopt SAIS because its particular features address our needs. And more significantly, SAIS has worked, and worked well, for over 700 of the world’s leading universities and colleges (e.g., NUS, NTU, SIM, Universiti Malaya, Chulalongkorn, HKU, HKUST, Harvard, Stanford, Cornell, Princeton, Cambridge, Oxford, ANU, RMIT, UNSW), including some local higher education institutions. Properly implemented, SAIS can do much more than the respective registration systems previously or currently in use in the CUs can handle.

SAIS has already been successfully implemented previously in three CUs—in Manila, Baguio, and Cebu. This semester we introduced SAIS in UP Los Baños, and after a few initial glitches at the start, SAIS settled down to its normal operation, thus enabling registration to proceed up to its completion. The fact that there were initial glitches cannot mean that the system per se is fatally flawed, and thus, to be rejected.

We already expected that the adoption of any new system, such as SAIS, will have birthing problems. But in the case of UPLB, the problems were compounded by a massive and apparently malicious Denial of Service (DoS) attack on our server at around the start of registration, which is now under investigation by the authorities. Apparently, someone out there wanted SAIS to fail, for reasons only he or she can tell.

I assure you that we are dealing with operational problems as well as certain issues being raised by the students and will make SAIS work as it should, while taking cognizance of everyone’s needs and concerns.

There have been suggestions, for example, that we should have sought a cheaper, open-source alternative. We already did. We discovered in 2012 that a consortium of US universities, known as Kuali, had been trying to develop a student administration software. However, we found out that a consortium member (University of California Berkeley) had pulled out after five years of waiting and another one (Florida State University) had left a couple of years earlier. Both of these universities that pulled out of the consortium subsequently decided to adopt the Oracle PeopleSoft Campus Solutions software, which we call SAIS, for their student information system.

The original quote for the software suite we got was not cheap, but we were able to secure the perpetual license at a huge discount. In any case, the benefits we expect it to bring us would far outweigh the costs. And I would like to make it clear that whatever funds we have spent on the eUP program did not, and will not, diminish any of the pre-existing funding commitments of UP prior to our administration.

The reality is that during the past five years we have been able to mobilize very substantial increases in the funding for UP from government and other sources.

This availability of funding resources has enabled us to pursue not just the eUP program, but also many other important and much bigger initiatives. For example, we have been able to provide substantial merit promotion (P800 M) and monetary benefits (P2.8 B) to our faculty and staff members; to invest in more than a hundred new buildings and renovations in our various campuses (P9 B); to modernize the hospital equipment of PGH (P3 B); to support interdisciplinary research of our faculty (P950 M); to support their PhD and Master’s studies; to provide them research dissemination travel grants; to recognize their achievements through professorial chairs, enhanced scientific and arts productivity awards, and other academic awards; to send students on exchange programs abroad; to provide undergraduate and postgraduate student assistantships; and to meet other priority needs of the University and its constituents.

I understand and accept that dramatic political action is part of our hallowed tradition of dissent. In a sense, this is good as it provoked more questions about and drew more attention to what eUP is all about and what it will mean to the University’s future.

As I approach the end of my term, I can only hope that as a university—indeed the national university—we can continue to discuss and resolve our problems in an atmosphere of reason and sobriety, impelled by our common love of this institution and our desire to seek only the best for it and its future. That desire should include openness to new ideas and new technologies to improve the way we work.

As a community of scholars, students, and workers dedicated to the truth, we cannot allow malice, ignorance, and disinformation to derail the University’s growth or block the way forward.

Should you have any more questions about any aspect of eUP or SAIS, my office will only be too happy to receive and to answer them.

There is an urgent need for us to catch up with our peer universities in the region and the rest of the world. Please join me in this continuing quest to bring our beloved University up to the highest global standards—to be a model for the other local higher education institutions. Much of the future of our country will depend on the future of the University of the Philippines.

Thank you for your attention and support.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Alfredo E. Pascual (sgd.)

President

 

 

Accountability tool can help Duterte in completing housing projects for Yolanda victims

Dr. Marieta Sumagaysay of UP Visayas delivers her reaction to the reports in the forum

The government is eyeing to complete its housing efforts for communities affected by typhoon Haiyan—one of the strongest storms to make landfall in recent history—in December 2013. An accountability tool could help President Rodrigo Duterte improve the quality and ensure the adequacy of the rest of the housing units that will be distributed to families this year.

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UPCIDS) highlighted this in the forum “Housing and Challenges to Housing Service Delivery under the Duterte Administration,” held on September 1 at Microtel-UP Technohub, Quezon City.

“Assessing the accountability of government officials and other actors in the provision of shelter post-disaster will enable President Rodrigo Duterte and our new housing czar, vice president Leni Robredo, to not only prevent the misuse of our resources but will also make housing development a barometer for true public service,” said Dr. Edna E.A. Co, UPCIDS executive director.

UPCIDS, in their book “Building Back Better: A Democratic Accountability Assessment of Service Delivery After Typhoon Haiyan,” presented lessons and key recommendations on assessing the democratic accountability of duty bearers—the national and local government units, and claim holders—the communities, in addressing the housing needs   in Guiuan, Eastern Samar and Palo, Leyte; these are areas most devastated by Haiyan in 2013.

In the book, UPCIDS pointed out the important role of local government units (LGUs) in setting up a mechanism to respond to disaster needs and incorporate the accountability mechanisms of answerability, responsiveness and enforceability in service delivery in disaster management.
The above principles complement the framework developed by the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA), an intergovernmental organization that supports democratic reforms.

The UPCIDS hopes that their assessment could encourage a “rethinking of how traditional tools for accountability such as user outreach, ad hoc user meetings, publication of performance data and others could be introduced and better communicated and disseminated.”

To read the blow-by-blow updates from the forum and book launch, please visit the Twitter page of CIDS (@upcids) or check the hashtag #DuterteHousing.

 

Ms. Leena Rikkila Tamang (International IDEA) and Dr. Edna Co (Executive Director, CIDS)

 

Ms Amy Melendres (HUDCC) with Dr. Edna Co

Ms Amy Melendres (HUDCC) with Dr. Edna Co

 

Prof. Ladylyn Mangada (UP Visayas) and Dr. Edna Co

 

Mr. Philip Aranas (Guiuan LGU) and Dr. Edna Co

 

Prof. Richard Cagara, Dr. Marieta Sumagaysay, and Mr. Christer Gerona (UP Visayas) with Dr. Edna Co

 

Researchers from UP Visayas, representatives from International IDEA, Politracs Inc., UP CIDS, and Guiuan LGU

 

Spanish model of decentralization focus of third RTD on federalism

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The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) conducted the third leg of the round table discussion series “Federalism: Facts, Myths, Opportunities, and Challenges” with Fernando Zapico of the Embassy of Spain in Manila. Held at the Board of Regents Room in Quezon Hall, UP Diliman last August 18, 2016, Zapico shared insights on the development, challenges, and experiences of Spain in decentralization.

Zapico’s presentation tackled the different aspects of the highly decentralized political system of Spain. Though Spain is not a federation, the Philippines can still learn lessons from the Spanish model, especially in the dynamics of autonomous states. Among the topics discussed were the historical, political, and cultural motivations behind the decentralization, laws and articles relevant to autonomy, competencies of states, economic matters, and the special cases of Basque Country and Navarra.

Through a table presenting a comparison between the autonomous communities model and the federal model, Zapico said that the former does not allow constituent power but recognizes the statute of autonomy for its laws and the superiority of the constitution. The federal model, on the other hand, recognizes constituent power, relies on the Constitution, and practices distribution of powers.

Zapico emphasized the flexibility and openness of the framework for decentralization and pointed to institutional loyalty, political dialogue, and solidarity as key elements in the creation of the decentralized system.

Participants from Congress, UP, and other organizations inquired Zapico on many topics such as government funding, criteria for creating states, and security measures.

The round table discussions aims to take a closer look on different models of federalist systems to assist in making sound and prudent decisions with regard to Philippine governance. To read about the first discussion, click here; to read about the second, click here.

 

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Sustainable Energy Talks on August 22, 2016

Sustainable Energy Talks Ad

 

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies is inviting you to the “Sustainable Energy Talks”, which aims to enable discussion among academics, government, industry, and the public about sustainability issues, innovations, and key topics in the energy sector such as Technology, Market, Policy, and Behavior.

On August 22, 2016, we will be talking about the motivations, coverage, and incentives of the Electrical Power Industry Reform Act of 2001 and the Renewable Energy Law of 2008.

Fill in this form to confirm your attendance: https://goo.gl/forms/AcfIlwng3KzevsBY2

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The U.P. Sustainable Energy Program (UP SEP) is one of the five major programs of the U.P. Center for Integrative and Development Studies. The UP SEP aims to become a national and global resource for integrating existing and future works, disseminating information among diverse audience, and formulating questions and solutions towards innovative and sustainable energy system solutions, with the focus on the Philippine energy system.

Swiss expert: political system must fit country’s needs

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The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) hosted the second installment of “Federalism: Facts, Myths, Opportunities, and Challenges,” a series of round table discussions on federalism with Dr. Nicole Töpperwien at the Board of Regents Room in Quezon Hall, UP Diliman last August 10, 2016.

Dr. Töpperwien, co-founder of Swiss thinktank Ximpulse, shed light on the experience of federal Switzerland. She provided a historical background of Switzerland’s federalist system, which was seen as a way to end over-centralization. She also talked about the challenges they faced, such as demarcation due to pre-existing political structures and issues of marginalization.

What draws people to consider federalism, according to Töpperwien, is how it can cater to different visions and motivations. But she emphasized the importance of devising a system that is appropriate to the nation’s needs, and she is convinced that every country can do so. With recent experiences in mind, “It’s much better if you work together,” said Töpperwien.

Her presentation also included insights from her discussions on federalism in Myanmar and Nepal; both countries are considering federalization.

In the open forum that followed, participants from government, academe, and civil society organizations shared ideas on and inquired about power distribution at different levels, decentralization, fiscal arrangements, financial equalization, symmetries and asymmetries, and judicial institutions, among others.

The round table discussions aims to take a closer look on different models of federalist systems to assist in making sound and prudent decisions with regard to Philippine governance. To read about the first discussion, click here.

 

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German, Indian models discussed in CIDS RTD on federalism

 

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The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) conducted the first of a series of round table discussions on federalism titled “Federalism: Facts, Myths, Opportunities, and Challenges” held at the Board of Regents Room in Quezon Hall, UP Diliman last August 4, 2016.

The series of round table discussions aims to take a closer look on different models of federalist systems to assist in making sound and prudent decisions with regard to Philippine governance.

Wolfgang Heinze of the Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom and Dr. Suresh Kumar of the Embassy of India, Manila joined the discussion and provided key concepts and mechanisms, historical backgrounds, and indigenous experiences of federalism and federalization of Germany and India, respectively.

Also in attendance were representatives from the academe, government, and civil society organizations.

Heinze presented the history and current form of Germany’s federal system plus the reforms made to address administrative problems. He said that the aim of such system was to prevent the emergence of another autocrat; moreover, he emphasized that people and institutions matter in the formation of a federalist system.

Kumar began by stating the commonalities between India and the Philippines, especially the colonial experience of both nations. He then continued to discuss how the Indian Constitution came to be and its unitary features in detail, like the judiciary, public services, and appointments of top officials.

An open forum followed after Heinze’s and Kumar’s presentations where participants asked questions and shared insights on different topics such as the dynamics of political parties and parliamentary systems, land borders and land use planning, and trade and industry facilitation.

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Job for Immediate Hiring!

The Center is looking for a Research Assistant for Migration and Development that can start ASAP.

Please check the qualifications below. Clearance from previous work is an additional requirement (if previously employed).

UPDATE: Application for this job is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

RA-R&D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Email your applications until Wednesday, August 10, 2016.

 

How can PH improve science enterprise?

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Productivity metrics, human resource development eyed for improvement of R&D in the country

For the final leg of the President Edgardo J. Angara (PEJA) Fellowship lecture series, the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) and the UP National Institute of Physics (NIP) hosted “Human Resource Generation and Funding Absorption Capabilities of the Philippine Scientific Enterprise System” with Dr. Caesar Saloma.

Held at the NIP Auditorium last July 19, 2016, the lecture showed the current state of the country’s scientific enterprise system, which is comprised of “the institutions and organizations… that are directly involved in the training of future scientists and researchers.”

Dr. Caesar Saloma, who specializes on instrumentation, is one of the five fellows awarded the previous year and is a professor at the NIP.

CIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co delivered the opening remarks, followed by UP President Alfredo E. Pascual’s message, read by AVP for Public Affairs Dr. Jose Wendell Capili. Senator Edgardo J. Angara was also present in the lecture and delivered a message. Dr. Helen Yap of UP MSI introduced Dr. Saloma.

Dr. Saloma presented the results of his analysis of the Engineering Research and Development for Technology (ERDT) and the Accelerated Science and Technology Human Resource Development (ASTHRD) programs in terms of research productivity and human resources generation to provide recommendations in furthering the productivity of the Philippine scientific enterprise system.

Following Dr. Saloma’s lecture proper were reactions from Dr. Ernesto Pernia, newly appointed director-general of the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) and Dr. William Padolina, president of the National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST).

An open forum followed and NIP Director Dr. Roland Sarmago close the program.

 

CIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co

Dr. Edna E.A. Co, Executive Director of Center for Integrative and Development Studies

 

AVP for Public Affairs Dr. Jose Wendell Capili

Assistant Vice President for Public Affairs Dr. Jose Wendell Capili

 

Former UP President Edgardo J. Angara

Former UP President Edgardo J. Angara

 

Dr. Ernesto Pernia Secretary, Socio Economic Planning / Director-General, National Economic Development Authority

Dr. Ernesto Pernia, Secretary of Socio Economic Planning and Director-General of National Economic Development Authority

 

Dr. William Padolina, President, National Academy of Science and Technology

Dr. William Padolina, President of National Academy of Science and Technology

 

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Dr. William Padolina and Dr. Caesar A. Saloma

 

Dr. Roland Sarmago

Dr. Roland Sarmago, Director of the National Institute of Physics

 

The presentation of Dr. Saloma can be viewed below:

UP’s high-impact projects celebrated in 2nd President’s Toast

President
University of the Philippines President Alfredo Pascual celebrated the launch and successful implementation of several of the university’s high-impact projects in the 2nd President’s Toast held at the Bulwagan ng Dangal on July 5.

The event was organized by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS), together with the Office of the secretary of the University (OSU), and the Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs (OVPPA).

The OSU formally launched its Manual of Operations, a publication outlining the university’s administrative processes.

The launch was followed by the presentation of CIDS’ findings from its National Marine Policy Review and Strategic Direction project to Jose Luis Alano, Undersecretary and Executive Director of the National Coast Watch Council.

Lastly, the OVPPA presented a report on the recently concluded UP sa Halalan 2016, and introduced two new initiatives: the UP Resources for Science-Informed Literacy and Engagement towards Building Community Resilience (RESILIENCE) project, and Galing UP, Lingkod Bayan: UP Award for Excellence in Public Service.

President Pascual commended these accomplishments, noted the efforts and synergy made by the offices involved and reiterated the importance of UP’s visibility and service to the public.

 

Dr. Edna E.A. Co

Dr. Edna E.A. Co, Executive Director, UP CIDS

 

Dr. Lilian A. De Las Llagas

Dr. Lilian A. De Las Llagas, Secretary of the University and of the Board of Regents

 

Undersecretary Jose Luis Alano

Undersecretary Jose Luis Alano, National Coast Watch Council

 

UP sa halalan

UP sa Halalan Project Team

 

Galing UP Project Team

 

UP Resources for Science-Informed Literacy and Engagement towards Building Community Resilience (RESILIENCE) Project Team

 

Public Lecture: Human Resource Generation and Funding Absorption Capabilities of the Philippine Scientific Enterprise System

Caesar Saloma Poster
Everybody is invited to participate in the next offering of the UP President Edgardo J. Angara (PEJA) Public Lecture Series to be held at the NIP Auditorium on July 19, 2016, Tuesday, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm. Dr. Caesar Saloma will give a presentation entitled, “Human Resource Generation and Funding Absorption Capabilities of the Philippine Scientific Enterprise System”.

About the Lecture

The lecture presents a set of policy recommendations for improving the productivity of the Philippine scientific enterprise system. The recommendations are developed from our analysis of the performance of the Philippine higher education institutions that form the backbone of the enterprise system especially the Engineering Research and Development for Technology (ERDT) and the Accelerated Science & Technology Human Resource Development (ASTHRD) programs that were established and supported by the Department of Science and Technology in 2007 and 2009, respectively. The University of the Philippines System is the only public institution that is qualified to participate in both programs.

The Philippine scientific enterprise system refers to the institutions and organizations in the country that are directly involved in the training of future scientists and researchers in the basic, applied and social sciences, engineering and technology as well as mathematics (STEM) as well as in the generation of new scientific knowledge that improves the accuracy of our understanding of natural phenomena. When applied successfully, new scientific knowledge would boost labor productivity, create wealth and enhance the quality of life in society.

On the other hand, funding absorption deals with the capacity of the enterprise system to improve its scientific productivity in terms of PhD graduates and peer-reviewed scientific publications in response to increases in financial support for scientific research and development.

For Inquiries/RSVP

For confirmation and details, please contact Ms. Rose Punay at telephone numbers 981-8500 local  4266, 4267, and 4268 or email [email protected]. You can also pre-register for the event on the form below.

Gov’t agencies need social media policies for better exchange with the public

Dr. Clarissa David

Dr. Clarissa David

As part of the President Edgardo J. Angara (PEJA) Fellowship lecture series, the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) and the UP College of Mass Communication (CMC) hosted “Formulating a Social Media Policy for Frontline Government Agencies to Improve Public Communication” with Dr. Clarissa David at the Bulwagan ng Dangal at University Main Library last July 5, 2016. The lecture addressed the issues in the engagement of three Philippine frontline agencies, namely the Department of Education, Department of Health, and the PAGIBIG fund, with the public through social media channels.

Dr. David is one of the five fellows awarded the previous year and is a professor at the UP CMC. Her researches focus on public opinion, political communication, public interventions, and communicating policy.

CIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co welcoming the attendees

CIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co welcoming the attendees

CIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co opened the program and delivered UP President Alfredo E. Pascual’s message in his stead. Mr. Mikey Abola delivered the message of Senator Edgardo J. Angara.

Dr. David stressed the dual function of government agencies’ social media channels: to serve announcements and be the digital complaints and grievances desk of the public. As such, proper and helpful engagements must be observed. However, Dr. David advised against infographics that most do not appreciate and photos with public officials that the public deem unnecessary. Finally, Dr. David proposed social media engagement policies and guidelines to ensure effective communication with the public, who are now more inclined to use social media with its ubiquity, accessibility, and immediacy.

Prof. Rachel E. Khan from CMC and Ms. Chay Hofileña of Rappler shared their insights and comments on Dr. David’s study. The open forum followed and CMC Associate Dean Arminda V. Santiago closed the program.

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Prof. Rachel E. Khan, Dr. Clarissa C. David, and Ms. Chay Hofileña during the open forum

 

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Attendees of the Dr. David’s lecture

 

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A participant asking a question during the open forum

 

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Associate Dean Arminda Santiago closing the program

 

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Prof. Rachel E. Khan, Dr. Clarissa C. David, and Ms. Chay Hofileña

 

Dr. Clarissa David’s lecture slides can be downloaded below.

Support and protection for Filipinas in maritime industry necessary

Prof. Lucia Tangi during her lecture

Prof. Lucia Tangi

 

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) and the UP College of Mass Communication (CMC) hosted the third leg of the President Edgardo J. Angara (PEJA) Fellowship lecture series, titled “Empowering Filipino Women Seafarers in the Maritime Industry” with Prof. Lucia P. Tangi. Held at the Bulwagan ng Dangal at University Main Library last July 4, 2016, the lecture focused on the history and current state of Filipina seafarers and proposed ways of alleviating poor working conditions for such.

Prof. Lucia Tangi is one of the five fellows awarded the previous year and is a professor at the CMC. Her specializations include business reporting, news writing, feature writing, press history, gender and media.

 

Associate Dean Arminda

Associate Dean Arminda V. Santiago welcoming the attendees of the lecture.

CIDS Executive Director Edna E. A. Co

CIDS Executive Director Edna E. A. Co reading President Pascual’s message

 

CMC Associate Dean Arminda V. Santiago welcomed the lecture’s attendees and guests. CIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co read UP President Alfredo E. Pascual message, and Mr. Mikey Abola from the office of Senator Edgardo J. Angara delivered his message in his stead.

Prof. Tangi focused on the challenges brought about by sexism and patriarchal beliefs that Filipina seafarers face, followed by suggestions for policy for their welfare, support, and protection. Following Tangi’s lecture proper were reactions from Ms. Carla S. Limcaoco, vice president of Women in Maritime Philippines and Dr. Odine Maria M. De Guzman, director of the UP Center for Women and Gender Studies. Experts and students gave comments and asked questions in the open forum. CIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co concluded the program with closing remarks.

 

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Ms. Carla S. Limcaoco and Dr. Odine Maria M. De Guzman with Prof. Lucia Tangi

 

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Attendees of the lecture by Prof. Tangi

 

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Prof. Lucia Tangi during her lecture

 

The presentation of Prof. Tangi can be viewed below:

Watch: Dr. Tamayao’s presentation entitled “Benefit Cost Analysis of Wind Energy in the Philippines”

Dr. Mili-Ann M. Tamayao, Assistant Professor at the Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research of the UP College of Engineering, presented in the recently concluded International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology (ISSST) held at Phoenix, AZ, U.S.A on May 16-18, 2016. Dr. Tamayao’s presentation was entitled “Benefit Cost Analysis of Wind Energy in the Philippines”, which was based on a study that determined whether wind energy systems in the country result in lower cost of energy and CO2 emissions. The research team was composed of Alvin Palanca, Dr. Louis Danao, Rowie Carpo, and Dr. Virginia Soriano, all from the UP College of Engineering. The research was funded by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS).

The presentation of Dr. Tamayao starts at 1:07:22.

Below is the presentation slides used by Dr. Mili-Ann M. Tamayao.

UP professor proposes corporate income tax reduction, rationalization of incentives

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The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) and the UP School of Economics hosted the public lecture “A Review of Corporate Income Tax Policy in the Philippines” with Dr. Stella Luz A. Quimbo as part of the President Edgardo J. Angara (PEJA) Fellowship lecture series. Held at the Room 125 of the UP School of Economics last June 15, 2016, the lecture addressed the issues in taxation, particularly in corporate income tax (CIT), and the relations among incentives, efforts, and investments.

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Dr. Stella Luz A. Quimbo during her lecture on tax

Dr. Quimbo is one of the five fellows awarded the previous year and is a professor at the UP School of Economics and commissioner of the Philippine Competition Commission. Her specializations and research interests cover microeconomics, health economics, industrial organization, econometrics, and public economics.

 In attendance were former UP President and Senator Edgardo J. Angara, Senator Juan Edgardo “Sonny” Angara, and Ways and Means Committee Chair of the House of Representatives Romero “Miro” Quimbo, one of the co-authors of “Do Investments Respond to Taxation and Incentives? Evidence from the Philippines,” the basis of the lecture. The program was opened by UP School of Economics dean Orville Jose C. Solon, and Dr. Jose Wendell Capili, AVP of the Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs, delivered UP President Alfredo E. Pascual’s message in his stead. Senator Edgardo J. Angara also shared his remarks regarding issues in taxation and how they can benefit from Dr. Quimbo’s study.

In the lecture, Dr. Quimbo discusses tax reforms, tax incentives, and tax efforts. She also explains the use of the accelerator model of investments to “assess the responsiveness of industry investments to changes in tax rates and incentives.” Based on the findings, Quimbo calls for tax reforms which include the consideration of lowering CIT and rationalization of fiscal incentives, among others.

The lecture’s discussants, Synergeia Foundation CEO Dr. Milwida M. Guevara and UP School of Economics professor Dr. Renato E. Reside, Jr., shared their insights and comments on Dr. Quimbo’s study. The open forum followed after, in which Sen. Sonny Angara remarked the study’s implications on policymaking, and Dr. Edna Co, CIDS Executive Director, closed the program

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Former UP President Edgardo J. Angara

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Dr. Edna E.A. Co

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vice President Gisela P. Concepcion

Vice President Gisela P. Concepcion

Senator Sonny Angara

Senator Sonny Angara

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dr. Renato E. Reside, Jr., Dr. Milwida M. Guevara, Sen. Sonny Angara, Dr. Edna E.A. Co, Dr. Stella Luz A. Quimbo, Rep. Miro Quimbo

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Dr. Milwida M. Guevara, Dr.Stella Luz A. Quimbo, Dr. Renato E. Reside, Jr.

Identifying players in maritime disputes significant in shaping foreign policy—analyst

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For the first leg of the President Edgardo J. Angara (PEJA) Fellowship lecture series, the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) and the UP Asian Center hosted the public lecture “Domestic Stakeholders in Philippine Maritime Disputes: Impact and Influence on Foreign Policy” with Dr. Aileen S.P. Baviera. Held at the GT-Toyota Asian Center Auditorium at UP Asian Center last June 3, 2016, the lecture aimed to shed light on the dynamics between main domestic stakeholders in multiple levels, foreign policy, and the maritime disputes in which the country is involved.

DSC03921 Dr. Baviera is one of the five fellows awarded the previous year and is a professor at the UP Asian Center. Her specializations include contemporary China studies, China-Southeast Asia relations, Asia-Pacific security, territorial and maritime disputes, and regional integration.

CIDS Executive Director Edna E.A. Co welcomed the lecture’s attendees and guests. UP President Alfredo E. Pascual was also in attendance and delivered the opening remarks. CIDS Executive Director Co also delivered Senator Edgardo J. Angara’s message, which recognized the significant contribution of Dr. Baviera’s study in the maritime disputes, in his stead (Sen. Angara’s message may be read here).

Dr. Baviera focused on the maritime disputes with China and Taiwan and tackled their influence on dominant stakeholders in the issue, both at the national and local levels and in both government and nongovernmental positions. After the analysis, implications for foreign policy were also bared. Following Baviera’s lecture proper were reactions from Mr. Chito Sto. Romana, lecturer of UP Asian Center and Philippine-Chinese relations expert, and Mr. Benito B. Valeriano, Assistant Secretary of the Maritime and Ocean Affairs Office of the Department of Foreign Affairs. Students and experts weighed in on the lecture and asked question in the open forum. Dr. Joefe Santarita, dean of UP Asian Center, concluded the program with closing remarks.


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UP President Alfredo E. Pascual delivering the opening remarks.

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CIDS Director, Dr. Edna E.A. Co welcoming the attendees of the event.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mr. Chito Sta. Romana, Prof. Aileen S.P. Baviera and Asec. Benito B. Valeriano during the open forum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The presentation of Dr. Baviera can be viewed below:

Public Lecture: Formulating a Social Media Policy for Frontline Government Agencies to Improve Public Communication

Clarissa David

Everyone is invited to the public lecture of Dr. Clarissa C. David, Professor of the College of Mass Communication, who will deliver a lecture “Formulating a Social Media Policy for Frontline Government Agencies to Improve Public Communication”  on 05 July 2016, 9:00 am at Bulwagan ng Dangal, Roxas Street, UP Campus, Diliman, Quezon City. Registration starts at 9:00 am.

About the Lecture

Social media has increased in importance as the Internet-connected population of the Philippines grows. Different government agencies, depending on function, have embraced and fully adopted social media channels. Many potential benefits can be reaped from a strategic and effective use of social media but there are also attendant risks to having these direct and official channels of communication between agencies and the public, the press, and interest groups. This research examines social media use by frontline government agencies, using three specific cases namely:  the Department of Education, Department of Health, and the PAG-IBIG Fund. Frontline agencies have special uses for social media. These case studies provide guidance for social media policies in three key areas: (1) direct client interactions and how having responsive social media accounts can help improve service provision, (2) forms of social media engagement with the press and the public that can serve agency goals, and (3) organizational settings around social media management that can amplify the benefits of its use.

 

This public lecture is jointly sponsored by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) and the UP College of Mass Communication.

For Inquiries/RSVP

For confirmation and details, please contact Ms. Rose Punay at telephone numbers 981-8500 local  4266, 4267, and 4268 or email [email protected]. You can also pre-register for the event on the Google form below:

Public Lecture: Empowering Filipino Women Seafarers in the Maritime Sector

Lucia Tangi

 

The Center would like to invite everyone to the public lecture of Lucia P. Tangi, Professor of the College of Mass Communication, who will deliver a lecture “Empowering Filipino Women Seafarers in the Maritime Sector” on 04 July 2016, 1:00 PM at Bulwagan ng Dangal, Roxas Street, UP Campus, Diliman, Quezon City. Registration starts at 12:30 PM.

About the Lecture

Filipinos account for  a  quarter  of  the  world’s   1.6 million seafarers. However, Filipino   women  account  for  only  around  two  percent  of more than  300,000  seafarers  deployed  annually.  Around 90 percent of these  women seafarers are in the services  and domestic sectors,  doing jobs  that  are related to their reproductive  duties.  Because  of this,  Filipino women  seafarers  are among the  lowest paid  in the  seafaring  industry  and are also among the  most vulnerable  to  redundancy . Following the enactment in the 1990s of the Women in Development and Nation Building Act, maritime schools started opening up to women who wanted to become  sea officers.  Although more  women  have been  attracted to seafaring in the past decade, the number of  women   sea officers  has remained  small  compared to the  thousands of male  sea officers deployed every year. Based on focus group discussions and key informant interviews with almost a hundred stakeholders, this study finds that women  sea officers  often  face discrimination as soon as they start applying for shipboard internship and employment. They have  to battle  loneliness, sexual harassment  and  bullying  by their male colleagues on board.  This study  finds that patriarchal beliefs and control  in the seafaring industry  have discouraged  women  sea officers from pursuing  their career at sea.This  is aggravated by ship owners’ race to reduce cost at the expense  of seafarers.  Using  SaraLongwe’s Empowerment Framework as guide, this policy research  proposes some package  of  measures  to empower  women by addressing  issues on welfare, access, conscientization, mobilization and control.

This public lecture is jointly sponsored by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) and the UP College of Mass Communication. Also attached here is the abstract of the lecture.

For Inquiries/RSVP

For confirmation and details, please contact Ms. Rose Punay at telephone numbers 981-8500 local  4266, 4267, and 4268 or email [email protected]. You can also pre-register for the event on the Google form below:

 

A Review of Corporate Income Tax Policy in the Philippines

 

Stella Luz A. Quimbo Public Lecture

 

The Center would like to invite everyone to the public lecture of Dr. Stella Luz A. Quimbo, Professor of the School of Economics, who will deliver a lecture on  “A Review of Corporate Income Tax Policy in the Philippines” on 15 June 2016, 10:00 AM at Room 125 of the UP School of Economics, Guerrero corner Osmeña Sts, UP Diliman, Quezon City.

This event is organized by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies and the UP School of Economics.

For confirmation and details, please contact:

Ms. Maria Reora of UP School of Economics, tel. nos. 920-5461, 927-9686 local 222 or email [email protected];

Ms. Rose Punay, tel. nos:  981-8500 local  4266, 4267, and 4268 or email  [email protected]; [email protected].

You can also confirm your attendance on the form that follows:

Message of Former UP President Edgardo J. Angara on the First PEJA Lecture 2016

UP PRESIDENT EDGARDO J. ANGARA (UP PEJA) PUBLIC LECTURE

“Domestic Stakeholders in Philippine Maritime Disputes:

Impact and Influence on Foreign Policy”

by Dr. Aileen S.P. Baviera, PhD

 UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP-CIDS)

 03 June 2016 | GT Toyota Asian Center Auditorium, UP Diliman Q.C.

 Edgardo J. Angara

Message

 Former President, University of the Philippines

Former President of the Senate of the Republic of the Philippines

_____________________________________________________________________

 EVIDENCE-BASED POLICY

Justin Trudeau, Canada’s charismatic Prime Minister., won last year on a platform of openness and transparency, effectively differentiating himself and his party (the Liberals) from his predecessor, Stephen Harper and the Conservatives.

One of the main pillars of the Liberal’s platform was pursuing “evidence-based policy.” They advocated that “[g]overnment should base its policies on facts, not make up facts based on policy.” Without evidence, they said government makes arbitrary decisions that have the potential to negatively affect the daily lives of citizens

I said as much when we heard in 2012 the public lecture of Dr. Gerardo Sicat – the last of the inaugural batch of UP PEJA Fellows. Government, in my view, can only meaningfully govern if it is guided by correct data and information.

Unfortunately, this knowledge is not always available to policymakers. Or worse, many politicians refuse to acknowledge the reality the information reflects.

Bridging that knowledge gap should be an abiding concern of the academe. Professors, researchers and other public intellectuals fulfill their nation-building role when they actively produce policy studies that government can refer to when making very difficult socio-political choices.

This is what I should to institutionalize by establishing the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies, when I was UP President. And I’m happy to note that this is the same objective we are pursuing through the UP PEJA Fellowships.

 

MARITIME DISPUTES

Today, few international issues command more domestic attention than the South China Sea disputes. The area has already been tagged as a geopolitical hotspot and a possible staging ground for a proxy war among the world’s strongest nations.

The maritime disputes pose as well a national security challenge that the incoming administration must confront.

At stake are the busiest sea lanes in the world, rich marine and fishing resources and potentially abundant gas and oil deposits.

What is also being challenged and tested in the international rule of law, under which all states-large or small, mighty or weak – are enjoined to treat each other with respect and civility, not through blatant of brute military might.

In the coming weeks, the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague is expected to rule on our complaint against China. And it’s an open secret that whatever the decision, Beijing will refuse to acknowledge and follow it.

Studies such as what Dr. Baviera will present today greatly help – particularly by crystallizing what the country’s “national interest” really is, which allows us then to further identify possible openings in the icy relations between Manila and Beijing. Taking an objective and calm academic approach to the dispute may hopefully lead to alternative solutions.

 

Thank you!

Job Opening at CIDS

The Center is currently looking for Research Assistant on Migration and Development.

UPDATE: Application for this job is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

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Job Opportunity

 

The Center is currently looking for Full-Time Research Assistant for Federalism

UPDATE: Application for this job is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

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Job Opening at CIDS

The Center is currently looking for Full-Time Research Assistant for China/Strategic Studies Program

UPDATE: Application for this job is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

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Domestic Stakeholders In PHL Maritime Disputes: Impact And Influence On Foreign Policy | A Public Lecture

PEJA Tarp_Baviera_revised(Original article from UP Asian Center)

The Center for Integrative Development Studies (CIDS), in partnership with the,UP Asian Center will be holding a public lecture, “Domestic Stakeholders in Philippine Maritime Disputes: Impact and Influence on Foreign Policy” by Professor Aileen S.P. Baviera. It will be held on 3 June 2016, 9 a.m. to 12 n.n. at the GT-Toyota Asian Center Auditorium, UP Asian Center. The lecture is free and open to the public; seating is first-come, first-served, but participants are encouraged to sign up to expedite the registration process on the day of the forum.

About the Lecture

Foreign policy in democratic states is often assumed to be an extension of domestic policy. What is articulated as “national interest” before the international community is ideally a “public good” arrived at, partly at least, through an aggregation of the aspirations, objectives, concerns, and values of domestic constituents. With respect to the Philippines’ maritime disputes with China and Taiwan, this paper investigates who the main domestic stakeholders are (at both the national and local levels, governmental, as well as nongovernmental), examines how and to what extent they are affected by the maritime disputes, and explores how these stakeholders interface with foreign and security policy, primarily through the question: do these domestic actors and interests represent vulnerabilities, pressure points, or sources of support for current foreign policy on maritime disputes? The paper then tries to draw implications for future foreign policy objectives.

About the Speaker

Dr. Aileen SP. Baviera is Professor at the Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman. She specializes on and writes about contemporary China studies, China-Southeast Asia relations, Asia-Pacific security, territorial and maritime disputes, and regional integration. The editor in chief of the journal, “Asian Politics & Policy,” she is the author of many academic publications, including the “The Domestic Mediations of China’s Influence in the Philippines,” which will appear in Rising China’s Influence in Developing Asia, edited by Evelyn Goh and published by Oxford University Press. She completed her Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of the Philippines Diliman.VIEW FULL PROFILE.

About the Discussants

Chito Sta. Romana is President of the Philippine Association for Chinese Studies (PACS) and Lecturer at the UP Asian Center. Benito B. Velasco is Assistant Secretary of the Maritime and Ocean Affairs Office, Department of Foreign Affairs, Republic of the Philippines.

About the Organizers

As the think tank of the university, The University of the Philippines-Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP-CIDS) spans various perspectives, methodologies, and ideologies in its conduct of basic and policy-oriented research. The Center harnesses the University’s multidisciplinary expertise in its studies on critical fields. Professor Baviera’s lecture is an outcome of her year-long research conducted under the UP President Edgardo J. Angara (UPPEJA) Fellowship, which she received last 2015.  According to the UP System press release, The UPPEJA Fellowship aims to “promote high-level policy discussions and research on topics that address national development goals and imperatives.”

About the Venue

The GT-Toyota Asian Center Auditorium is inside the GT-Toyota Asian Cultural Center, which houses the UP Asian Center. Please view this vicinity map for your reference. Note in the map that vehicles entering the GT-Toyota Asian Cultural Center compound can only do so through the gate in Magsaysay Avenue. Pedestrians can enter the compound via the very small gate on Guerrero Street. The gate is beside the “Romulo Hall” sign and faces the parking lot of the UP College of Law.

For Inquiries/RSVP

For questions regarding the lecture, please contact CIDS at [email protected] or [email protected] or via [email protected].

Interested parties can fill up the form below.

 

 

 

President Edgardo J. Angara Public Lecture

PEJA Public Lecture Series

  • Aileen S.P. Baviera, PhD

Date : 03 June 2016, Friday
Time : 9:00 am – 12:00 nn
Venue : GT Toyota Asian Center, Auditorium
Magsaysay Avenue corner Katipunan Avenue UP Diliman, Quezon City

Title : “Domestic Stakeholders in Philippine Maritime  Disputes:
Impact and Influence on Foreign Policy”

  • Stella Luz A. Quimbo, PhD

Date : 15 June 2016, Wednesday
Time : 10:00 am – 12:00 nn
Venue : School of Economics, Room 125
Guerrero corner Osmeña Sts, UP Diliman, Quezon City

Title : “A Review of Corporate Income Tax Policy in the Philippines”

  • Lucia P. Tangi, DSD

Date : 04 July 2016, Monday
Time : 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Venue : Bulwagan ng Dangal
Roxas St., UP Campus, Diliman, Quezon City

Title : “Empowering Filipino Women Seafarers in the Maritime Sector”

  • Clarissa C. David, PhD

Date : 05 July 2016, Tuesday
Time : 9:00 am – 12:00 nn
Venue : Bulwagan ng Dangal
Roxas St., UP Campus, Diliman, Quezon City

Title : “Formulating a Social Media Policy for Frontline Government Agencies to Improve Public Communication”

  • Caesar A. Saloma, PhD

Date : 19 July 2016, Tuesday
Time : 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Venue : NIP Auditorium
C.P. Garcia Avenue UP Diliman Quezon City

Title : “Human Resource Generation and Funding Absorption Capabilities of the Philippine Scientific Enterprise System”
For inquiries, contact us Tel no. 981-8500 local 4266 to 68, e-mail: [email protected] or [email protected]
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NAMFREL Urges Every Citizen to “Be a Hero”

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The National Movement for Free Elections (NAMFREL) is calling on all citizens to be a one-hour NAMFREL volunteer in its “be a hero” campaign.   Citizens are invited to be at their precincts at the close of the polls on May 9 and observe the counting of ballots and the posting of the results in the election returns (ER’s).  NAMFREL one-hour volunteers are then urged to send the results of the votes for President and Vice President only to NAMFREL via SMS to 0922-166-3735 or to the NAMFREL website www.namfrel.org.ph.  Results received will be checked, verified and posted in the NAMFREL website as they are received.  This project is intended to inform the public of the votes coming in from different regions for these two highest elective positions and provides them with the opportunity to compare these ER’s with the transmitted results to the City of Municipal Board of Canvassers.

Volunteers are encouraged to visit the NAMFREL website to learn more about being a hero.

NAMFREL likewise urges citizens to be vigilant and report election-related incidents to the police authorities or the COMELEC.  The NAMFREL website will also be open to receive these incident reports and refer these to the proper authorities.

As in many years since 1983, NAMFREL has been bringing Filipinos together to work to help revive and sustain democracy by safeguarding the integrity of the vote.  This election is crucial as it is very close and thus passions may be unusually high.  The more reason we should all work together to ensure a safe and clean election.  We each have a responsibility to make this happen.

Job Openings at CIDS

UPDATE: Application for these jobs is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

The Center is also currently looking for persons to fill in the following positions:

1.      One (1) Publication Assistant

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2.   Two (2) Research Assistants for Migration Studies and Policy Program

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Interested parties may submit their applications to: [email protected]

IMPORTANT: In the subject line of your email, please indicate “PUBLICATIONS ASSISTANT Job Application ” for the Publication Assistant post and “RA Job Application – Migration Module Development” or “RA Job Application – Migration Statistic” for the Research Assistants for Migration Studies and Policy Program posts to assist us in processing your application.

Message of the President at the UP Knowledge Festival

From 17 to 19 April 2016, a landmark event is taking place in the history of the University of the Philippines—a grand gathering of the University’s leading scientists, artists, and researchers under one roof, expressly for the purpose of forging stronger collaboration between disciplines and seeking innovative solutions to our country’s needs and problems.

This event is the UP Knowledge Festival, devoted to the theme, Utak at Puso para sa Bayan (Minds and Hearts for the Nation), and it will showcase the outputs of UP’s top knowledge creators in the areas of food production, health, climate change, energy, technology, education, and the arts.

We are spearheading this effort in the belief that human and knowledge capital is our strongest and most valuable resource, and that its development is key to achieving national development and sustaining inclusive growth. We need to provide the Filipino genius with the motivation and the means to contribute in uplifting our people’s lives. Encouraging partnerships across disciplines can speed up that process.

Research & Development and Creative Work are crucial to building the knowledge economy. UP, as the national university, is in a unique position to mobilize experts from various sectors—Science & Technology, Arts & Humanities—to think and to work together toward key national objectives like better quality employment and poverty reduction. In this way, UP is serving as an academic hub around which government, industry, and civil society can converge as partners in a common cause.

The UP Knowledge Festival displays the best of what the University’s researchers have produced, and provide a forum for disseminating and putting to productive use our scientific and research breakthroughs. Thus, we hope to offer our knowledge—our minds and hearts—for the service of our people, and also put the Philippines in step with its dynamic ASEAN neighbors.

Let me therefore congratulate the organizers of this Knowledge Festival, and I look forward to sharing its rewards with the rest of the Filipino people.

Padayon, UP!

UP Knowledge Festival to showcase innovations in research and creative fields

 

From 17 to 19 April 2016, the University of the Philippines will showcase the outputs of its top scientists and artists in the areas of food production, health, climate change, energy, technology, education and more.

Billed UP Knowledge Festival: Utak at Puso para sa Bayan, the three-day event will be held at the Taal Vista Hotel in Tagaytay City as part of the University’s efforts to increase scientific literacy and artistic awareness in the country.

“We want people to see that what UP has been doing inside the laboratories, in field researches and creative works are timely, relevant and beneficial to the community and the nation,” explains Vice President for Academic Affairs Gisela P. Concepcion.

The three-day festival will comprise a number of activities. One will be an exhibit of cutting-edge research and innovations developed within the six clusters of the Emerging Interdisciplinary Research Program: (1) agri/aquaculture, food and nutrition, (2) health and wellness, (3) disaster risk management and climate change, (4) energy, environment and ecotourism, (5) technology, new materials and other products, and (6) progressive teaching and learning, which will be shared for the first time with state universities and colleges, government agencies, industry partners and the media.

“UP must serve as an academic hub with special emphasis on multi-, inter-, and transdisciplinary frameworks that can serve as a catalyst for development,” asserts UP President Alfredo E. Pascual. An educated populace with knowledge capital (also called suprastructure) can bring about innovative approaches that will address the problems of society. This in turn can spur sustainable and inclusive economic growth on a par with our dynamic ASEAN neighbors.

Moreover, there will be plenary sessions where renowned resource speakers will discuss topics such as Why Arts Should Matter (Dr. Butch Dalisay), Hazard Vulnerabilities of the Public School System: Communicating Data & Science (Dr. Clarissa David), Commercialization of Technology (Dr. Al Serafica), Building Knowledge Cities (Atty. Arnel Casanova), and Health Emergency Planning for Yolanda-affected LGUs: A Multidisciplinary Approach (Dr. Philip Padilla).

Finally, UP President Pascual will chair a roundtable on the role of higher level education for the creation and dissemination of knowledge and innovation. Since the topic of education was overlooked during the last presidential debate, the roundtable promises to be an incisive and engaging discussion with Drs. Edna Co and Butch Dalisay, Roby Alampay, Lourd De Veyra, Joselito Yabut, and Professors Emeriti Randy David and Ernesto Pernia.

For more information, please contact:

Rica D. Abad
Program Development Associate
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
Mobile Phone: (0917) 875-8703
Email: [email protected]

PUBLIC POLICY JOURNAL VOLUME 14

PUBLIC POLICY JOURNAL VOLUME 14 OUT NOW

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) has released the latest issue of its Public Policy Journal (PPJ), an academic publication which features key research projects conducted by university faculty members across the UP system.

The 14th issue of the journal features articles on indigenous peoples in the Cordillera region, an evaluation of the KALAHI-CIDSS poverty reduction program, an analysis of disaster risk response during the Typhoon Yolanda, and a piece on ASEAN integration.


To download the file:  click the pop out icon, a new window(google drive) will open. Click the arrow icon on top of the page to download/save.

The PPJ was launched in 1997 by then UP President Emil Javier to serve as one of the university’s contributions to public policy discourse from a multidisciplinary perspective. Publication of the journal was halted from 2007 to 2013, but will now be published twice a year.

 

Indonesian embassy, ISDS, UP to hold forum on resolving electoral contests

The Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia, UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies, Institute for Strategic and Development Studies of the Philippines, and the UP Department of Political Science invite you to a “Forum on Electoral Contests Resolution in Indonesia and the Philippines” at the ASEAN Hall of UP Asian Center on April 13, 2016, 8:30 AM.

Speakers from the Indonesian Commission on Elections (Komisi Pemilihan Umum or KPU) Indonesian Constitutional Court, Philippine House of Representatives Electoral Tribunal and COMELEC will discuss the best practices and experiences of Indonesia and the Philippines in resolving electoral contests. Dr. Aries Arugay of the UP Department of Political Science will serve as reactor.

The forum aims to explore issues encountered by these mechanisms in resolving electoral contests, and will take into account the differences in context in each state.

UP CALLS ON PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES TO INVEST ON KNOWLEDGE CAPITAL

UP logo

“Higher level education is the key to inclusive growth,” says UP President Pascual.

THE COUNTRY can produce thehigh-level human resource it needs to catch up with its neighbors if the next government adopts the right set of policies.

This was the gist of a “think paper” on “Knowledge-Based Development and Governance” presented by the University of the Philippines to all the presidential candidates for their consideration.

According to UP President Alfredo E. Pascual, the study—which he calls “a road map to inclusive growth”—can form the basis for a comprehensive review of Philippine educational and human resource development policy, particularly in research and development.

The study notes that despite increasing government investments in education, not enough money has gone into research and development, and into producing and supporting more top-level researchers. This is why the Philippineshas been left behind by many of its ASEAN co-members and continues to suffer from high income inequality and poverty.

“We still spend only 3 percent of GDP on education, compared to an average of 5-6 percent in the rest of ASEAN,” the paper noted, sounding the alarm. “This is why even our best universities lag behind their global and regional counterparts. In 2014, the University of the Philippines ranked only 8th out of the top 10 universities in ASEAN. In 2012, the Philippines ranked 92nd in the global Knowledge Economy Index, far behind Singapore, which placed 23rd.”

“Expenditure on research and development (R&D) by government and industry is low. So our level of technology remains low in quality and scale, and concentrated in sectors that are not considered high-value. To catch up and move ahead faster, we need to raise our technological knowledge and skills, which only advanced education and training can address.”

Put together by some of the national university’s brightest minds, the study notesthe importance of research and development (R&D) in achieving growth in this era that is driven by scientific and technological (S&T) advancement. Now, the country’s knowledge capital is the key to achieve and sustain inclusive growth that reduces inequality and poverty.S&T innovation supports the manufacturing sector which generates jobs for the poor. And higher level education and training enable people to create new knowledge, innovate products and processes, and improve productivity.

Innovations can spur new economic activity and growth in both urban centers and the countryside.

But to strengthen Philippine R&D, the government will have to send more Filipinos abroad for advanced studies, as well as encourage more foreign-based professionals to return. Leading international experts and educators should be hired to help bring their local counterparts up to global standards and to introduce new ideas.

The government will also need to map out a network of “hub-and-spokes” that will involve schools, government bodies, businesses, and civil society organizations throughout the country, tapping local expertise.

“Beyond building infrastructure, we need to build the suprastructure of economic growth,” said Pascual. “That means harnessing the intellectual and creative energies of our people through more rationalized and responsive education. We need to ensure that enough of our best minds stay in the country to drive innovation and help develop the rest of our labor force. It is also not enough to be satisfied with the country’s current success in mainly voice-based business process outsourcing. To really get ahead and add more value to the economy, we need to develop more software engineers and other technology experts.

The study was undertaken by the Center for Integrative and Development Studies, UP’s think tank, in coordination with the Office of the President and the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

“We hope that all our presidential candidates will read this paper and respond to its findings and recommendations in their platforms,” added Pascual. “We will welcome their ideas, and are inviting them to share those ideas with the University community and our people at large.”

On March 20, the University of the Philippines campus in Cebu will host a presidential debate, and education will be among the key topics on the agenda.

The full paper “Knowledge-Based Development and Governance: Challenges and Recommendations to the 2016 Presidential Candidates” may be viewed below:

[To download the file, click the pop-out icon to open a new page (Google Drive). Click the arrow icon on top of the page to download.]

A summary of the paper may also be viewed below:

[To download the file, click the pop-out icon to open a new page (Google Drive). Click the arrow icon on top of the page to download.]

MORE JOB OPPORTUNITIES AT THE CENTER

UPDATE: Application for this jobs is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

The Center is also currently looking for persons to fill in the following positions:

1. Publication Assistant

00012. Research Associate for Sustainable Energy Policy

0001

Interested parties may submit their applications to: [email protected]

IMPORTANT: In the subject line of your email, please indicate “PUBLICATIONS ASSISTANT Job Application ” for the Publication Assistant post and “RA Job Application – Energy Policy” for the Research Associate for Sustainable Energy Policy post to assist us in processing your application.

UP PROGRAM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE

UPPEGlogo

The UP Program for Environmental Governance (UPPEG) is a Learning Program implemented by the University of the Philippines through the UP CIDS in partnership with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The Learning Program aims to enhance the capacity of the provincial and community environment and natural resources officers (PENROs and CENROs) in the country by strengthening their competency in carrying out their vital roles in environmental governance. The UPPEG Module Sessions which run for five weeks, enrich their perspective, experience, attitude, knowledge, managerial skills and leadership qualities through experiential learning.

The Learning Program is comprised of six modules with twenty learning sessions developed by UP and the DENR with the University bringing together experts and specialists on environmental governance from its constituent universities namely, UP Los Baños, UP Diliman, and UP Visayas, to craft the UPPEG learning materials. Sessions include Environmental Governance and the Nature of Environmental Issues in the Philippines; Frameworks for Environmental Governance; Environmental Leadership and Principles of Conflict Management; Environmental Planning and Decision Support Systems; Managing Environmental Risks and Resiliency; and Human, Financial and Material Resources Management.

 

The UPPEG was launched on 18January 2016 as part of the President’s Toast- a celebratory event for high impact programs and projects undertaken by the University of the Philippines.

The UPPEG was launched on 18 January 2016 as part of the President’s Toast- a celebratory event for high impact programs and projects undertaken by the University of the Philippines.

The UPPEG Pilot Run was implemented from 18 January to 20 February 2016 and was hosted by the UPDiliman, UP Los Baños, UPVisayas in Iloilo Campus, the DENR Environment and Natural Resources Academy in Carranglan, Nueva Ecija and the DENR Central Office in Visayas Avenue, Quezon City.

There will be a roll out for the next batch of PENROs and CENROs and a new MOA between the University of the Philippines and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources is underway.

UPPEG1

UP CIDS JOB OPPORTUNITIES

UPDATE: Application for this job is already closed. Please check our website for any openings soon. Thank you!

The Center is currently looking for persons to fill in the following positions:

  1. Administrative Assistant for the Korean Studies ProgramJOB-OPPORTUNITY-AA-page-001
  2. IT/Technical Assistant

 

0001

Interested parties may submit their applications to: [email protected]

IMPORTANT: In the subject line of your email, please indicate “AA Job Application – Korean Studies” for the Administrative Assistant position  or “IT/TA Job Application” for the IT/Technical Assistant to assist us in processing your application.

Thank you!

PUBLICATION ON ADDRESSING ISIS INFLUENCE NOW AVAILABLE

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies has released the narrative reports on Radicalization in East Asia, a conference on the expanding influence of the Islamic State in the region.
The forum was held in May 2015 and features presentations from experts from the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS) based in Singapore. The conference was jointly organized by the RSIS, the Philippine Center for Islam and Democracy (PCID), the University of the Philippines College of Law, UP CIDS and Mindanao State University.
“Radicalization is both a challenge and a threat to the Philippines and the international community. There exists the appalling interconnectedness of terrorism at the international scale with the regional and local levels. Nonetheless, there is hope in reintegration, religious rehabilitation, and sustainable peacebuilding programs in its mitigation.”

To download the file:  click the pop out icon, a new window(google drive) will open. Click the arrow icon on top of the page to download/save.

ASSESSING THE TUWID NA DAAN: FOCUS ON THE FIVE KEY RESULT AREAS NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE

ASSESSING THE TUWID NA DAAN: FOCUS ON THE FIVE KEY RESULT AREAS


The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) has released an assessment of the Aquino administration’s performance in fulfilling the promises in the President’s so-called Social Contract with the Filipino People.
 
The publication titled Assessing the Tuwid Na Daan: Focus on the Five Key Result Areas (KRA) features analyses on the following priority projects of the incumbent administration: accountable and participatory governance, poverty reduction, inclusive economic growth, rule of law, and climate change adaptation and mitigation.
 
UP CIDS Executive Director Edna Co said the assessment of the KRA “determines the contributions and impact of the Aquino administration and whether a transformational government has delivered what is promised or what it aspired to deliver.”
 
Assessors who contributed to the volume include leading experts from the academe, ranking officials from concerned government agencies, and members of civil society.
 
This assessment is a summary of the papers and presentations prepared by the assessors. A supplement containing the full reports will be released next year.
For print copies of the publication, kindly contact the CIDS office at 981-8500 loc. 4266 to 67 or [email protected] and look for Joseph Cruzado (Librarian) or Lea Diño (Publications Assistant).

To download the file:  click the pop out icon, a new window(google drive) will open. Click the arrow icon on top of the page to download/save.

PUBLIC POLICY JOURNAL VOLUMES 12 AND 13

PUBLIC POLICY JOURNAL VOLUMES 12 AND 13 OUT NOW

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) has released the latest issue of its Public Policy Journal (PPJ), an academic publication which features key research projects conducted by faculty members across the UP system.

This edition of the PPJ is a double volume containing articles on a range of issues, including governance, security and foreign relations, poverty reduction, energy, and disaster risk management.

 To download the file:  click the pop out icon, a new window(google drive) will open. Click the arrow icon on top of the page to download/save.

The PPJ was launched in 1997 by then UP President Emil Javier to serve as one of the university’s contributions to public policy discourse from a multidisciplinary perspective. Publication of the journal was halted from 2007 to 2013, but will now be published twice a year.

 

Understanding China’s Foreign Policy Under Xi-Jinping: Towards New Sino-Philippine Relations by Robin Michael Garcia

Understanding  China’s Foreign Policy  Under Xi-Jinping:  Towards New  Sino-Philippine  Relations

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Robin Michael Garcia is currently a Doctoral Candidate in Political Science at the School of International Relations and Public Affairs (SIRPA) of Fudan University in Shanghai, China under a Full Chinese Government Doctoral Scholarship. He specializes in evolutionary theory in international relations and comparative politics. He is writing a dissertation on evolutionary institutional theory and economic transformations in Northeast and Southeast Asia under the supervision of Professor Shiping Tang, the pioneer of the Social Evolution Paradigm (SEP). He holds a Master of Public Administration with a specialization in public policy from UP-National College of Public Administration and Governance (NCPAG) and a BA in Development Studies from De La Salle University. He is also currently a Lecturer at the UP-Asian Center and was lecturer at De La Salle University. He worked as speechwriter for Speaker Sonny Belmonte Jr. and as analyst for the Liberal Party of the Philippines.

UP CIDS hosts a seminar on Philippine Studies for Chinese researchers

UP CIDS hosts a seminar on Philippine Studies for Chinese researchers

Twelve Chinese scholars and experts participated in the “Seminar on Philippine Studies for Chinese Researchers” organized by the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) China/Strategic Studies Program, in cooperation with the UP Office of the President, and the Asia Pacific Pathways to Progress Foundation, Inc. (APPFI). The seminar was conducted last August 17 to 26, 2015.

The Chinese participants invited to take part in the seminar represented seven institutions. These institutions include the School of International Relations of Xiamen University, the Philippines Institute in Sun Yat Sen University in Guangzhou, the Philippine program at China-ASEAN Institute of Guangxi University, the College of ASEAN of Guangxi University of Nationalities, the School of International Studies of Jinan University, the Institute of International Relations of the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences,  and China Institute for Reform and Development.

Prominent scholars and experts in various fields of study were invited as lecturers on topics such as Philippine history and anthropology, Philippine society and culture, Philippine government and politics, Philippine socio-economic and development issues, Philippine foreign relations, and Filipino psychology. Aside from lecture sessions, the Chinese participants also went on tour visits which enhanced their understanding of Philippine culture, economy, and politics. The seminar aimed to impart more accurate knowledge and better understanding of Filipino society and institutions, and in turn, contribute to the Chinese participants’ ability to be better interlocutors of Philippines-China relations.

Dr. Aileen Baviera officially welcomed the Chinese participants during the Opening Ceremony last August 17, 2015. The first lecture for the seminar was delivered by Dr. Carlos Tatel from the UP Department of Anthropology. He presented a general survey of Philippine history. In the afternoon, Dr. Cynthia Zayas, the director of the UP Center for International Studies discussed the distinctive feature of the Philippines’ maritime civilization, while Ms. Melinda de Jesus, executive director of the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility talked about the press in Philippine society.

Later that day, a Welcome Dinner sponsored by the UP Office of the President was held in the Board of Regents (BOR) room in Quezon Hall. UP President Alfredo Pascual and Vice-President for Academic Affairs Gisela Padilla-Concepcion formally welcomed the Chinese participants to the university.

On the second day of the seminar, the lectures covered topics on Philippine society and culture. Dr. Nestor Castro, a professor in the UP Department of Anthropology and currently the Vice-Chancellor for Community Affairs, addressed the question “Who is the Filipino?” in his lecture. Dr. Melba Maggay, the director of Institute for Studies in Asian Church and Culture talked about religion in Philippine society. Ms. Teresita Ang See, executive trustee of Kaisa Heritage Foundation Inc. discussed the subject of “Tsinoys” or Chinese-Filipinos in Philippine life.

The third day of the seminar was devoted to a walking tour in some of the most significant cultural sites in Manila. The Chinese participants toured Intramuros and the National Museum. The participants also visited the Bahay Tsinoy Museum and listened to a brief talk by Dr. Richard Chu on a historical perspective of the role of the Chinese in Philippine economic life.

Philippine law and politics was the overarching theme of the lectures on the fourth day of the seminar. Dr. Jay Batongbacal, director of the UP Institute for Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea (IMLOS) and project leader of the China/Strategic Studies Program, opened the session with a discussion of the government structure and the judiciary. UP Department of Political Science professors Dr. Jean Franco and Dr. Aries Arugay delivered lectures on legislative politics and on the issues, challenges and prospects of Philippine democratization, respectively. A professorial lecturer from the same department, Dr. Temario Rivera talked about elections, political families, and political parties. Dr. Teresa Melgar from the UP Department of Sociology gave a lecture on civil society and social movements.

On the sixth day, issues on socio-economic development were discussed. Dr. Emmanuel de Dios from the UP School of Economics lectured on contemporary trends in the Philippine economy. Dr. Jorge Tigno, the current chair of the UP Department of Political Science gave an overview of labor migration from the Philippines and development, while Dr. Carolyn Sobritchea, former director of the UP Center for Women’s Studies (CWS) talked about the situation of women and men in the Philippines.

China/Strategic Studies Program coordinator Dr. Aileen Baviera and project leader Prof. Herman Kraft delivered lectures on Philippine foreign relations on the eighth day of the seminar. Dr. Baviera talked about Philippines’ relations with China and ASEAN while Prof. Kraft discussed Philippine-US relations.

On the morning of the ninth day of the seminar, Prof. Jay Yacat of the UP Department of Psychology discussed Filipino social thinking, influence, and relations. In the afternoon, the Chinese participants were given an orientation tour of the House of Representatives. This visit served to supplement the participants’ knowledge on how the Philippine government works. They were able to witness how public hearings are held, and how bills are discussed in the lower house of Congress.

To wrap up the whole seminar, a roundtable discussion on Philippine-China relations co-hosted with the Philippine Association for Chinese Studies (PACS) was held on the last day. The roundtable discussion was moderated by Ms. Teresita Ang See. The event started with  opening remarks by Dr. Ellen Palanca, the director of the Confucius Institute of the Ateneo de Manila University. Four speakers delivered brief presentations: Mr. Chito Sta. Romana, UP Asian Center lecturer, on an assessment of political relations; Dr. Tina Clemente, UP Asian Center associate professor, on an assessment of economic relations; Dr. Li Kaisheng, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences associate professor, on Chinese and Philippines mutual misperceptions; and Dr. Huang Fei, Xiamen University assistant professor, on insights into the Philippines and the future of relations. Dr. Aileen Baviera synthesized the presentations and delivered the closing remarks.

Later that evening, a farewell dinner hosted by Mr. Carlos Chan of Liwayway Marketing Inc., a major Filipino business operating in China,  served as a closing ceremony. Dr. Aileen Baviera and APPFI Chairman Raphael Lotilla awarded the Chinese participants with certificates of completion and tokens of appreciation.

Overall, the “Seminar on Philippine Studies for Chinese Researchers” proved to be a success. Aside from fulfilling its aim of providing knowledge on Philippine society, culture, economy, and politics, the seminar forged new networks and friendships among the organizers, the participants, and the lecturers. The exchange of knowledge and the building of mutual confidence and trust is expected to help promote constructive approaches in Philippines-China relations, and to contribute to long-term benefits for the peoples of the two countries.

Independent Evaluation Program

THINK SUSTAINABLE, ACT RESPONSIBLE 
by Asian Development Bank (Independent Evaluation Program), September 15-16, 2015 at the ADB Auditoriums A-D, from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.

UP CIDS Executive Director Dr. Edna E.A. Co will serve as the lone representative/panelist from the UP on “Institutions and Governance”.

 

UP CIDS Migration Studies and Policy Program Invites UP Experts to Roundtable Discussion

Last August 10, the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP-CIDS) through the Migration Studies and Policy Program held the first of its series of roundtable discussions (RTD)with UP experts on migration at the Seminar Room of the UP Asian Center, UP Diliman. The series of RTD is in line with the UP’s advocacy for the establishment of a research center within the University that would relate academic discourse to the development of government policiesconcerning timely and pressing issues about migration and development.

Dr. Edna Co, executive director of the UP-CIDS, opened the program by introducing the migration project, which came about when UP was approached by government agencies to help in expanding the area of studies on migration.She added that the Philippines is a source of human resources and is a migrant sending country, which strengthens the call for the establishment of a think tank to address the need to produce relevant studies pertaining to migration issues. She stressed that the country needs informed decisions because migration is a highly complex issue that needs an interdisciplinary approach to tackle the matter, and that the academe should be atthe forefront in providing evidence-based policy recommendations. These policies should be able to assist government make decisions affecting migrants from the Philippines.

Dr. Amaryllis Torres, head of the Philippine Social Science Council, facilitated the discussion. The RTD was attended by 19 experts from different disciplines in the social sciences, health sciences, and the literary arts. Among the points discussed was the supply side of knowledge. The group wanted to find out the scholars within UP who have produced work in migration, and the different themes that these publications have encountered. Published materials that the project has reviewed came from a wide array of disciplines, each catering to a specific issue on migration. Another point of discussion was the sources of funding of these publications, if any. It was observed that most sources of funding came from private institutions and civil society groups which are concerned about migration, and a very few were funded by the government.

Prof. Clarinda Berja of UP Manila and project coordinator of the Migration Studies and Policy Program, presented the preliminary network analysis of the publications about migration studies in the Philippines. The analysis has shown that although there are a lot of studies about migration in the country, many of them are not connected with nodes and some of the networks are isolated.

The next round table discussion which will be on 3rd September, will engage researchers, academics and the government.

Logic Of LONG: The Continuity And Change Of China’s Foreign Affairs Under Xi Jinping | A Public Lecture

The UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) and the UP Asian Center will be holding a public lecture, “Logic of LONG (Chinese dragon): The Continuity and Change of China’s Foreign Affairs under Xi Jinping,” on Friday, 14 August 2015, 10 a.m. to 12 noon at the Seminar Room, GT-Toyota Asian Cultural Center, Asian Center,University of the Philippines Diliman. The lecture is free and open to the public.

In this lecture, Dr. Kaisheng LI identifies a three-tier structure that has historically determined Chinese foreign policy, one inspired by realism, idealism, Confucianism, and legalism. However, as Dr. Li argues, Chinese foreign policy has undergone a series of changes since Xi Jinping came to power. The shift, triggered by new domestic and international factors, has particularly seen a more anxious China vis-à-vis its security environment; and the transformation is exemplified by Xi’s implementation of tougher security measures, and call for a new type of relations between the global powers, the Sino-ASEAN destiny community, and the One Belt, One Road project, among others.

Dr. Li Kaisheng is Associate Research Fellow, Institute of International Relations, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, Shanghai, China. He has been a Visiting Scholar at the Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman since April 2015.

Seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis, but expressions of intent to come will be highly appreciated and can be sent at [email protected]. For more information, kindly contact Biel Pante at 981.8500 local 4266 and 4267; 63.2.435.9283; or email at [email protected].

UP CIDS China/Strategic Studies Program Invites Chinese Scholars for a Lecture Series

Last July, the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) under its China/Strategic Studies Program launched a lecture series featuring Chinese scholars. Along with the program’s other activities, the lecture series aims to promote intellectual and civil society linkages between the Philippines and China  in order to build mutual learning and trust.

The first lecture-discussion, organized in partnership with the UP Asian Center, was held last July 3, 2015 at the ERP Room of the UP CIDS. Dr. Chen Bo from the Center for Cold War International History Studies, East China Normal University delivered a lecture entitled “Archival Research on Sino-Southeast Asian Relations during the Cold War”. Dr. Rhodora V. Azanza, the Director of the Office of International Linkages (UP OIL) delivered welcome remarks while Assoc. Prof. Rolando G. Talampas, the College Secretary of the Asian Center, closed the forum.

Dr. Chen talked about the official Chinese Communist Party (CCP) archives and the provincial archives which show the diplomatic engagements of China with Southeast Asian countries, primarily with Vietnam, during the Cold War. He noted that despite being important materials in studying the diplomatic relations of China during the Cold War, the CCP archives are not open to the public. Meanwhile, he said that the provincial and local archives are “great buried treasures” which deserve to be explored in order to conduct diplomatic history studies of contemporary China.

Dr. Ricardo T. Jose from the UP Department of History served as the reactor for this event. He said that there are more documents on the Cold War available in the West  than in the East. One reason for this is the imbalance in the reproduction of documents and the level of leniency in each country. To end, he noted that in the Philippines, problems in accessing documents on the Cold War is the main reason why such historical period is greatly misunderstood.

The second lecture was held last July 23, 2015 at the ERP Room of the UP CIDS.  Dr.  Wen Zha from  China Foreign Affairs University delivered her lecture on China’s “One Belt, One Road Initiative” and its Political Risks. Dr. Edna A. Co, the Director of the UP CIDS, delivered the welcome remarks, while Dr. Aileen SP. Baviera, head of the China/Strategic Studies Program, served as the reactor for the lecture.

Dr. Zha emphasized that despite being seen as a prospective economic driver in China, the “One Belt, One Road” initiative that seeks to connect China economically with neighboring countries in both mainland and maritime Asia, has a lot of political risks. First, there is a great risk of a Sino-US rivalry in the region. Second, China’s neighbors are getting more anxious with regards to their dependence on China’s economy. Third, China’s capital investments may also be at risk due to domestic political conditions. Dr. Zha presented some suggestions on how China can minimize the political risks of its “One Belt, One Road” initiative. The suggestions included controlling corruption, relying on multilateral institutions such as the AIIB (Asian Infrastructure Investments Bank), ensuring that the economic benefits reach the majority, and understanding how to make the economic statecraft more effective. She concluded the lecture by saying that China has to build its economic influence through more cooperation.

Dr. Baviera agreed that the political implications of the “One Belt, One Road” initiative stir some concern in the region as China is not only becoming an economic superpower, but also a military superpower. In her view, while countries welcome economic cooperation with China, China seems to be asking countries to take a leap of faith if they support such an ambitious Chinese program. She added that in the face of disagreements with other countries, China seems to be setting issues aside instead of resolving them. The important question Dr. Baviera posed is what kind of behavior should be expected of China, if it is to gain trust and support with regards to its “One Belt, One Road” Initiative.

To download lecture Presentation of Dr. Chen Bo, go to this link:  http://cids.up.edu.ph/foreign-ministry-provincial-archives-china-research-sino-southeast-asian-relations-cold-war-dr-chen-bo/

To download lecture Presentation of Dr. Wen Zha, go to this link: http://cids.up.edu.ph/chinas-one-belt-one-road-initiative-political-risks-dr-wen-zha/

Open For Registration: 1st “Asian Politics & Policy” Conference

The Asian Politics & Policy journal, in cooperation with the Policy Studies Organization, the University of the Philippines’ Asian Center and the UP Center for Integrative and Development Studies, will be holding the 1st Asian Politics & Policy Conference on July 24–25, 2015 at the GT-Toyota Asian Cultural Center, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City.

This conference, with the theme “Is the Philippines Ready for a Post-American World?”, will bring together academics, government analysts, and public intellectuals to consider how a radically transformed external environment – particularly with the locus of economic power shifting to Asia – is creating new policy challenges for the Philippines’ political economy, foreign policy, security, and national as well as regional identity. View tentative program of the conference.

Registration Instructions:

1. Fill out the Online Registration Form here. Online registration is open only until July 10 . You will receive a confirmation email for successful online registration but slots will only be reserved upon submission of proof of payment.

2. Registration has a minimal fee of PhP 250.00 per day or PhP 400.00 for two days. You may register and pay at the APP office located at Room 205, Hall of Wisdom, GT-Toyota Asian Cultural Center, University of the Philippines, Magsaysay St. cor. Katipunan Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City, or deposit through the APP EIC’s bank account:

Account Name: Aileen S. Baviera
Metrobank Account Number: 361-7-36180605-7

The registration fee will cover the conference kit including an eco-bag, program, copy of abstracts, and CVs of the presentors.

3. You may email a scanned or clear copy of the deposit slip to [email protected], send through fax at 981-8500 local 3586, or send a photocopy to the APP Office (address as above). You will receive a confirmation email upon successful completion of registration.

Note: Slots for the conference are limited and are granted on a first-come, first-served basis. Early registration is highly recommended. Walk-in participants will not be guaranteed entry.

For queries, you may contact Sascha Gallardo at 981-8500 local 3586 or email us through [email protected].

UP PROFESSOR SAYS HIGH POWER RATES CAN BE REDUCED

UP PROFESSOR SAYS  HIGH POWER RATES CAN BE REDUCED

The Philippines has the highest power rates in the ASEAN region but these can be reduced by up to 20% by ensuring security of supply, said UP professor Rowaldo del Mundo  at a public lecture on April 16, 2015.

Prof. del Mundo of the UP Electrical and Electronics Engineering Institute, explained before a crowd of students, civil organizations representatives, private sector, government officials and policymakers as well as UP faculty members that the reduction of power rates can be done by aggregating the power demand of electric cooperatives and organizing a competitive and transparent procurement process for power supply contracting.

Citing his experience with electric cooperatives in Mindanao and Central Luzon, he concluded that by aggregating their power demand, distribution utilities (DUs) such as electric coops attain economies of scale and obtain market power. “Security of supply can be achieved by organizing competitive procurement process and designing properly the power supply contracts of DUs,” said Del Mundo.

Prof. del Mundo examined Philippine power rates in the context of five factors, namely, taxes, subsidies, fuel mix, privatization, and electricity market. Contrary to popular perception, reducing taxes for the power industry does not translate in huge drop in power rates. “If taxes in the Philippines are reduced to the level of taxes in ASEAN countries, only 2% to 3% [reduction] can be achieved,” Del Mundo stressed.

As for subsidies, even if the other ASEAN countries remove their subsidies, power rates in the Philippines will still be 30% higher, said Del Mundo. Moreover, compared with Singapore, which also does not subsidize its energy sector, even if we use the same fuel mix, the Philippine tariffs will still be higher by Php 2.00/kWh, he added.

Furthermore, privatization also increases the power rate as the new owner must recoup the costs of acquisition an existing power plant. To attain the largest reduction, the focus of policies must be on the electricity market and the security of supply.

He recommended that first, a mandatory public bidding should be done by distribution utilities (DU) in the procurement of power supply. To encourage the private sector to build more power plants, long-term forward contracts must be awarded for the operation of new power plants, whereas for existing ones, only short-term contracts should be granted to them. In addition, the DUs must submit to the Department of Energy (DOE) or the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) their power supply procurement schedule. If the DUs fail to procure power supply according to schedule, the government must step in and bid the uncontracted demand.

Second, the ERC should take a more proactive role in evaluating and approving power supply contracts for captive consumer of DUs. Hence, if a contract submitted by a DU is negotiated instead of resulting from a public bidding, the ERC should subject the contract to a “Swiss challenge,” he said.

During the open forum, Rep. Reynaldo Umali, House Energy Committee Chair, also gave updates regarding new bills proposed in the House of Representatives to amend Republic Act 9136, also known as EPIRA. He also called for collaboration with the academe to provide technical assistance in the review of current energy policies.

The public lecture was organized by the University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) under its Sustainable Energy Program (SEP), and was held at the Engineering Theater, Melchor Hall, University of the Philippines Diliman.

Dr. Edna Co, Executive Director of UP CIDS, opened the program by discussing various initiatives of the Center, one of which is the SEP. Dr. Mili-Ann Tamayao, Program Director of SEP, discussed the thrust of the program. She also called for interdisciplinary collaboration in understanding the energy sector as well as partnerships among the academe, the government, civil sector organizations, and the private sector toward a sustainable energy policy.

Prof. Del Mundo’s slides may be downloaded at http://cids.up.edu.ph/lecture-2015.

1st Asian Politics & Policy Conference: Call for Papers

1st ASIAN POLITICS & POLICY CONFERENCE: Call for PapersThis 1st Asian Politics and Policy Conference will bring together academics, government analysts, and public intellectuals to consider how a radically transformed external environment – particularly with the locus of economic power shifting to Asia – is creating new policy challenges for the Philippines’ political economy, foreign policy, security, and national as well as regional identity.

Presentations and papers on the following suggested themes are welcome:

  • Philippine economic strategies for the new Asian century
  • The future of the Philippines-US alliance
  • Living with China, but loving it?
  • ASEAN Regionalism: its promises and its discontents
  • Alternative constructions of “region”
  • The Philippines’ new security partnerships
  • What is an independent foreign policy in a global era?
  • Military modernization: imperatives and perils
  • Winning the peace: from Mindanao to the South China Sea
  • Filipino diaspora: the next 40 years?
  • Being and becoming Filipino: ethnicity, identity and cyberspace
  • The Philippine archipelago: is our maritime geography a curse or blessing?

Selected papers will be reviewed and may be published in a special issue of Asian Politics & Policy and/or as an edited volume byWestphalia Press.Authors are advised to look at guidelines posted at this link. All submissions and inquiries should be sent to [email protected].

This conference is a collaboration among Asian Politics & Policy, the Policy Studies Organization, the University of the Philippines’ Asian Center, and U.P. Center for Integrative & Development Studies.

 

 

 

Prof. Miriam Coronel Ferrer expounded on GPH-MILF protocol as confrontation- avoidance measure amid Mamasapano discussions.

Amid continuing discussions over the Mamasapano incident, the UP CIDS hosted a forum on “The Mamasapano question and its implications and challenges to peace in the Bangsamoro” with Prof. Miriam Coronel Ferrer as the resource person. In a room-filled audience of approximately a hundred people, the forum held at the ERP room of the CIDS in the University of the Philippines Diliman, on the 26th February 2015, was meant to shed light on the discussion that grips the nation at this time.

Prof. Ferrer, the government’s chief negotiator with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), highlighted the role and structure of the protocol in situations of conflict including that of the Mamasapano incident.

UP CIDS Executive Director Dr. Edna E. A. Co opened the forum by reading out the statement made by the “Professors for Peace” urging sobriety and more evidence-based discussion and debate” in determining the next steps in promoting peace following the January 25th Mamasapano incident. She mentioned that a copy of the peace statement is also posted at the CIDS website.

As discussed in full details in Prof. Ferrer’s report, there wereinstances since 2009 of joint cooperation between the two parties, namely government and the MILF,in going after criminal elements, private armed groups, and extremists.

Ferrer also tackled the difficulties encountered in halting the January 25 incident in Mamasapano, Maguindanao that killed almost 70 people (police commandos, MILF rebels, and civilians). According to her, it was not easy to extract extremist elements from a community where people of differing ideologies and loyalties live alongside each other and where there seem to be no physical boundaries between or among them.

Following Prof. Ferrer’s discussion on the concerns over the Bangsamoro Basic Law’s provisions on local governance, funding for the block grant, and judicial system, a robust question and answer portion took place between the resource person and the audience, a good number of whom were Muslims.

The event was co-organized by the UP-CIDS and the UP-Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs.

 

GPH Peace Panel Chair Prof. Miriam Coronel-Ferrer talk on ​”The Mamasapano question and its implications and challenges to peace in the Bangsamoro”

“The Mamasapano question and its implications and challenges to peace in the Bangsamoro”

by Prof. Miriam Coronel-Ferrer, GPH Peace Panel Chair

GPH Peace Panel Chair Miriam Coronel-Ferrer to talk about effects of Mamasapano incident to peace in Bangsamoro region
Attaining just and lasting peace, especially in Muslim Mindanao, has been one of the main goals of the Aquino administration. In particular, the latter has been working on the enactment of the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) which, among other provisions, is providing for the replacement of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) with a new autonomous political entity.However, the Mamasapano incident has raised critical questions over efforts to pass the BBL, with a little more than a year before the end of the administration’s term.The incident in Mamasapano, Maguindanao had killed almost 70 people (police commandos, MILF rebels, and civilians).Amid the sentiments and thoughts on the Mamasapano incident and continuing concerns over the BBL’s future, GPH Peace Panel Chair Prof. Miriam Coronel-Ferrer will talk on “The Mamasapano question and its implications and challenges to peace in the Bangsamoro.” Prof. Ferrer will discuss the effects to attaining peace in the Bangsamoro region by the January 25 incident. This event will be held on February 26, Thursday from 1 to 3:30 pm at the ERP Room, L/G Floor Bahay ng Alumni, University of the Philippines (UP) Diliman, Quezon City. It is organized by the UP-Center for Integrative and Development Studies and the UP Office of the Vice President for Public Affairs.To be invited to the event are members of UP’s academic community, individuals from other universities, representatives of civil society organizations (CSOs) and non-government organizations (NGOs). It is hoped that through this event, UP may have a venue to express opinions on the matter.


 

Click here to download Prof. Ferrer’s presentation during the talk on the “Mamasapano question and its implications and challenges to peace in the Bangsamoro.” 

or paste URL address: http://cids.up.edu.ph/mamasapano-question-implications-challenges-peace-bangsamoro/

President Edgardo J. Angara Fellowship Awardees

The President Edgardo J. Angara (PEJA)  Fellowship Award has five new fellows!

The new PEJA awardees are:

  • Prof. Aileen S.P. Baviera, PhD

“Foreign Policy Analysis, Influence and Impact of Domestic Interest Groups on Philippine Policy Towards China and Taiwan in Relation to Maritime Dispute”

  • Prof. Stella Luz A. Quimbo, PhD

“A Review of Corporate Income Tax Policy in the Philippines”

  • Prof. Clarissa C. David, PhD

“Formulating a Social Media Policy for Frontline Government Agencies to Improve Public Communication”

  •  Prof. Caesar A. Saloma, PhD

“Human Resource Generation and Funding Absorption Capabilities of the Philippine Scientific Enterprise System”

  • Prof. Lucia Tangi, PhD

“Empowering Filipino Women Seafarers in the Maritime Sector”

The details of the awarding ceremony for the new PEJA Fellows will soon be announced.

CIDS Current Activities: Researches and Forums

  1. Migration Research and Policy Program in collaboration with the Commission on Filipinos Overseas (CFO) and other government agencies and stakeholders attempts to put the data on Philippine migration and envisions to do data analytics for policy purposes.

Core Team: Dr. Jean S. Encinas-Franco, Dr. Jorge V. Tigno, Dr. Edna E.A. Co and Dr. Emmanuel C. Lallana

Contact person in CIDS: Claire Pantoja

  1. China Program takes a transdisciplinary approach in an effort to understand the  links and relationship between the Philippines and China.

Core Team: Dr. Aileen SP. Baviera, Dr. Tina S. Clemente, Prof. Herman Joseph S. Kraft and Dr. Jay L. Batongbacal

Contact person in CIDS: Jeanena Rafer

  1. Sustainable Energy Program attempts to examine and dissect the energy crisis and the factors that envelop the sector. The program attempts to demystify the sector and explore not only immediate but also medium and long-term options for dealing with energy and power issues.

Core Team: Dr. Mili-Ann Tamayao, Prof. Rowaldo del Mundo, Prof. Ray Goco, Dr. Louis Angelo Danao, Dr. Rosario Ang, Atty. Ma. Gisella Reyes, Dr. Maria Joy Abrenica, Dr. Helena Agnes Valderama and Dr. Laura David

Contact person in CIDS: Hilton Lazo

  1. Framework Development for the Review and Updating of the National Marine Policy 1994 takes a closer look at the existing marine policy but this time, UP takes a transdisciplinary perspective on the policy and its prospects.

Core Team: Dr. Jay L. Batongbacal, Dr. Aileen San Pablo-Baviera, Atty. Celeste Ruth L. Cembrano-Mallari, Dr. Marie Antonette Juinio-Meñez, Dr. Porfinio Alexander M. Aliño, Dr. Gil S. Jacinto, Dr. Ernesto M. Pernia, and Dr. Edna E. A. Co

Contact persons in CIDS:  Allan Chester B. Nadate and Ruby Shaira F. Panela

  1. UP Program for Environmental Governance among the CENROs. UP prepares an interdisciplinary module on environmental governance benchmarked on selected university efforts in the Asia-Pacific region. The module is used to enhance the perspective and shells of CENROs around environmental governance.

Core Team: Dr. Oscar B. Zamora, Dr. Agnes C. Rola, Dr. Josefina Dizon, Dr. Juan M. Pulhin, Prof. Marlo Mendoza, Prof. Emelinda Mendoza, Dr. Rico C. Ancog, Dr. Mario Delos Reyes, Dr. Alfredo Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Dr. Daniel Vincent H. Borja, and Dr. Rene Ofreneo

Contact person in CIDS:  Mark Gamboa

Projects Supported by CIDS

  • A Study of the Implementation Synergy of Mother Tongue Based Multilingual Education in Schools and the Broader Community in View of RA 10533

Project Leader: Maria Mercedes Arzadon, UP Diliman

  • Accelerating irrigation development in the Philippines: Policy Issues and Recommendations

Project Leader: Victor B. Ella, UP Los Baños

  • Assessing the New Employment Patterns and Coping Mechanism of Selected Workers in BPOs of Cebu IT Park, Philippines

Project Leader: Adela Ellson, UP Mindanao

  • Chronotype-Specific Adjustment to Shift Work of Contact Center Agents in the Philippines *Project 1 -Chronotype of Filipino non-shift workers and shift workers

Project Leader: Gayline Manalang Jr., UP Manila

  • Comparative Analysis of Anti-Discrimination Policies at the Local Level: Toward Gender-Fair & LGBT-Inclusive Governance in the Philippines.

Project Leader : Jean S. Encinas-Franco, UP Diliman

  • Conservation Finance: A Comparative Analysis on Planning and Management Arrangements in Areas with High Biodiversity Value

Project Leader: Ricardo M. Sandalo, UP Los Baños

  • Constructing Models of Best Practices for Supplementary Implementing Guidelines of DepEd’s MTB-MLE (Phase II)

Project Leader: Anna Christie V. Torres, UP Bagiuo

  • Drivers and Barriers of Physical Fitness Program in Selected Government Offices in Davao City

Project Leader: Jezreel M. Abarca, UP Mindanao

  • Emerging Best Practices for Management of Research and Development among Selected Philippine Government and Academic Institutions: A Qualitative Approach

Project Leader: Edison D. Cruz, UP Diliman

  • Environment and Food Security Interactions under Climate Change in Selected Communities in the Sta Cruz Watershed

Project Leader: Agnes Rola, UP Los Baños

  • Environment-induced Migration and Mobility Patterns: Lessons Towards Building Resiliency in Yolanda-Affected Fishing Communities in Leyte

Project Leader: Marieta B. Sumagaysay, UP Visayas

  • Evaluating the socio-ecological impacts of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) in the Philippines: Beyond the MEAT (Management Effectiveness Assessment Tool)

Project Leader: Porfirio Alexander Miel Aliño, UP Diliman

  • Finding Appropriate and Participatory Housing Policies to Resolve the Problem of Cebu City’s Informal Settlement Systems

Project Leader: Phoebe Zoe Maria Sanchez, UP Cebu

  • Fish Stock at Risk: Is Regulating Beneficial for the Sardine Fisheries of the Visayan Sea

Project Leader: Ruby P. Napata, UP Visayas

  • Improving the Bivalde Mariculture Industry in the Philippines through Regulatory Reforms

Project Leader: Liberty N. Espectato, UP Visayas

  • Evaluating of communication influence on Dengue Preventions Practices in Davao City

Project Leader: Nelfa M. Glova, UP Mindanao

  • Life Cycle Cost Benefit Analysis of Wind Energy in the Philippines

Project Leader: Mili-Ann M. Tamayao, UP Diliman

  • Mainstreaming LDRRMC-IEC Efforts in a Calamityprone Barangay in Dinagat Island

Project Leader: Dennis John F. Sumaylo, UP Mindanao

  • Mapping and Modelling of Crime Incidences in Cebu City to be used in Crime Prediction for Public Safety

Project Leader: Ryan Ciriaco M Dulaca, UP Cebu

  • Relative benefits: Kinship, competition and the quality of local government

Project Leader: Rogelio Alicor L. Panao, UP Diliman

  • Risk Factors Associated with Outbreak of Infectious Diseases and Emergence of Psychosocial Problems in the aftermath of disasters in Marikina, Manila and Cavite

Project Leader: Lydia R. Leonardo, UP Manila

  • Sikat Saka Program and Its Benefits and Impacts to Small Farmer-Borrowers

Project Leader: Karen P. Quilloy, UP Los Baños

  • The nature and dynamics of sister-cities program in the Philippines

Project Leader: Michael Tumanut, UP Diliman

  • Toward Philippine Green Cities Assessing Land Use, Community Practices and Policies on Urban Sustainability

Project Leader: Kristian Karlo Saguin, UP Diliman

  • Tracking Resource Flows and Processes in Disaster Response and Recovery: Yolanda Realities and Policy Implications

Project Leader: Rachel Khan, UP Diliman

  •  Translation of and communicating natural disaster risks via digital and social media using disaster icons

Project Leader: Benjamin Vallejo Jr., UP Diliman

FOURTH CALL for SUBMISSION

 
The University of the Philippines-Center for Integrative and Development Studies(UP-CIDS) is soliciting articles for the 2015 volumes of the Public Policy Journal (PPJ).

 

Contributors are free to submit papers on various topics, especially those that are relevant to policymaking and the 4Es (“Economic Emancipation, Employment, Education, and Environment”) of the Center.

We also welcome articles on urbanization and resource management, interaction and / or divergence of K+12 and indigenous learning systems, and the current state of civil society organizations/ NGOs.

Articles may contain the following:

  1. Identification of an issue or problem of public interest and concern;
  2. Contextual background of the public issue or concern ( such as institutional, legal, social, political, economic, or cultural context);
  3. Evidence-based and scientific methodology applied to the topic  analytics;
  4. Presentation  and effective argumentation of options and alternatives;
  5. Implications or recommendations for decision, adoption, change or any similar course of action by policymakers whether local, national, or global.

Manuscripts, using Times New Roman or Calibri font size 12 and in single space or 1.5 spacing, must be submitted on CD, email attachment, or hard copy. Margins should be between 1” and 1.5.” Manuscripts must use 8.5 x 11 paper size and must be around 15 pages in length (around 7,500 words). Manuscripts must include abstracts and proper references with end notes kept to a minimum. References should be in Chicago format and cited in-text preferably through endnotes. But in-text citations for contributions from the natural, physical and health sciences may use the author-date system. A writing style that is comprehensible and easy to read is preferred and welcomed. Authors may submit tables, graphs, maps, illustrations and other artwork with the manuscript.

Contributors may also submit book reviews, essay reviews, review essays, or article reviews. These articles, two to five (2-5) pages long and an average of 500 words per page, should be in the format as stated above. Authors of books reviewed by contributors can respond with articles following the same format.

All manuscripts must be original. Authors should be prepared to rewrite their articles in accordance with the comments and suggestions of referees. The editors will not assume any responsibility for manuscripts received; materials will be returned only if a written request for these is made by the author/s.

The deadline of the articles’ submission would be on September 27, 2015. For any inquiries, please contact Jeff Asuncion, Lea Diño, or Rose Punay through [email protected] or [email protected] and 4359283, 9288387 or 981-8500 loc 4267 / 4268.

 

The Journal

The PPJ was established in 1996 to “examine in depth contemporary key economic, social and political issues facing the country.”  It was expected be “an authoritative journal for public policy guidance to be disseminated to other academic institutions, policy makers in government, the private business sector and non-government organizations.” The journal’s initial issue first saw print in the last quarter of 1997. PPJ thenbecame a bi-annual publication during the 2000s.

 

The PPJ contains four to seven (4-7) main articles and some book reviews. The articles are mainly solicited by the Editor. The articles contain important insights into the making of public policy in the country, in the region, and the world. The articles may spring from researches which are funded by the CIDS, those previously read in national or international conferences or those which may be purposively or specifically requested by the Editor from leading academics and researchers.

Public Policy Journal Relaunch

Public Policy Journal Relaunch

The Public Policy Journal (PPJ), an academic journal published by the University of the Philippines through the UP System’s Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS), has a new issue out, after eight years.

The 2007-2013 issue of the journal features papers by: Gerardo Sicat on reform of Philippine labor policies; National Scientist Raul Fabella on the role of the state and collective action in investments; Ramon Pedro Paterno on financing universal health care; and, Michael Tan on changing identities among ethnic Chinese in the Philippines. Edna Co, CIDS executive director, does a book review of The Rise of Sharing: Fourth-Stage Consumer Society in Japan.

At the launch, President Alfredo Pascual expressed his administration’s aim to regularize publication of journals and to assure support for PPJ. He hoped the journal can be the higher education journal of the country.

He encouraged more collaborative research work for the journal. “[These] policy papers will help our policy-makers make evidence-based, well-thought out decisions,” Pascual said.

Vice President for Academic Affairs Gisela Concepcion sees PPJ as a means for UP research to reach political leaders and society in general, and as a means for leaders in various disciplines to integrate research for policy papers. Concepcion suggested tackling such public concerns as overseas work, business process outsourcing, energy, and government procurement. She added that UP was thinking of establishing more multidisciplinary courses to generate more articles for the journal.

Concepcion also recognized the efforts of former CIDS director Malou Nicolas in charting future directions for CIDS.

Co thanked the UP System Administration for reviving PPJ. She said  this was a celebration of the University’s mandate to move society to action through the flow of ideas. She hoped the dissemination of ideas from UP’s public intellectuals, such as through PPJ, would have a multiplier effect in society.

The PPJ will now be published twice a year. It was launched in 1997 by then UP President Emil Javier with the objective of providing a forum for the examination of key contemporary public policy issues from a multidisciplinary perspective.

Pascual, Concepcion, Co, and CIDS Publications Officer Jeff Asuncion launched the new issue on December 10 at the Executive House in UP Diliman in simple ceremonies attended by contributors Fabella, Tan, and Paterno.

Photo Credit: Mr. Misael Bacani, Photographer UP SIO

Public Policy journal is​ available online, you may download a PDF file by going to this link:  http://cids.up.edu.ph/public-policy-journal-download/

An Independent Evaluation of the FOI Bills – “Balancing right to information with competing interests of individuals, state and bureaucracy: What’s the score on the FOI bills?”

UPCIDS will organize a forum on pursuing greater access by Filipinos to data relevant to public interest. The event, “Balancing right to information with competing interests of individuals, state and bureaucracy: What’s the score on the FOI bills?” 

Given that the bill has evolved through various Congresses, and as we await the bill’s consideration by the House plenary, this is an opportune time to provide a platform to evaluate the most advanced versions of the FOI bill.

We have requested Atty. Jose Manuel Diokno, Dean of the De La Salle College of Law, to make an independent evaluation of the Senate bill and the House proposed substitute bill, in terms of the balance between the right to information and other competing interests of individuals (such as privacy) and of the state and the bureaucracy.

Invited to be the forum’s reactors are Right to Know, Right Now! Coalition Co-convenor Atty. Nepomuceno Malaluan(confirmed), Reps. Neri Colmenares(invited), Leni Gerona-Robredo(confirmed) and Kaka Bag-ao(invited). They are expected to give comments on the evaluation by Dean Diokno.  

This event will be held on March 17, 2015 Tuesday 8:30 am to 1:30 pm at the ERP Room, L/G Floor Bahay ng Alumni, University of the Philippines (UP) Diliman, Quezon City.

The presentation will be followed by an open discussion with the participants. Invited participants will be from the academe, Congress and civil society groups.

UPdate on PNoy

UPCIDS INVITES YOU TO JOIN US IN OUR SERIES OF PUBLIC FORUM

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS), a UP system-wide center, has a tradition of putting out the “State of the Nation” as part of its mandate as an integrative and development research unit of the university.

The UP CIDS organized a series of public learning sessions on the achievements of the administration under President Benigno S. Aquino III, and together with the academia and other players, put together a picture of the ‘state of the nation’ from 2010 till the present.  The learning sessions were done through an open presentation will be documented, distilled, and put out by the University of the Philippines. The state of the nation used the Key Result Areas (KRA) defined by the Aquino administration as a basis for the presentation, discussion, and learning. We invited the concerned agencies of government to lead the presentation and assessment of the Aquino administration. The agencies are those involved in the implementation of the KRAs. The UP CIDS also invited resource persons who served as counterpart assessors from the academia and experts from other sectors.

The Key Result Areas are as follows :

1)      Transparent, accountable, and participatory governance

2)      Poverty Reduction and empowerment of the poor and vulnerable

(Including Health and Education, Job Creation, and Rural Development)

3)      Rapid, inclusive, and sustained economic growth

4)      Just and lasting peace and the rule of law

5)      Integrity of the environment and climate change adaptation and mitigation

To view picture gallery of these events go to: UPdate on PNoy Gallery

Round Table Discussions on “Strengthening our Institutions of Policymaking”

The University of the Philippines Center for Integrative and Development Studies (UP CIDS) held a series of round table discussions (RTD) on the topic “Strengthening our Institutions of Policymaking”.

The initiative of the UPCIDS is inspired by the current events and discourse on the dynamics between and amongst our branches of government. We wish to highlight in these round table discussions that in spite of the noise and challenges that hang over the heads of our institutions such as the Executive and the Legislative, the Executive and the Judiciary, the Judiciary and the Legislative, and so on, as Filipinos, we look forward to a discernment on  overcoming the relational challenges of the institutions and to strengthening the institutions of democracy as  institutions that work for ONE NATION rather than as competing branches of government.

As an academic institution, the University of the Philippines through the CIDS, wants to contribute to the discourse and hopefully, an enlightenment by experts  through the latter’s analysis, insights and recommendations that would strengthen our institutions such as the Legislature, the Executive, and the Judiciary in an environment of democracy and rule of law.

The Round Table Discussion will come in a series :

RTD 1 will focus on the topic from the perspectives of former justices, constitutionalists, and legislators.

The RTD 1 was held on 4 September 2014, Thursday, from 1:30-5:00 in the afternoon.

Invited Resource Persons:

  • Maria Lourdes C. Fernando
  • Atty. Christian S. Monsod
  • Atty. Rene Saguisag
  • Former Secretary Rafael Alunan
  • Former Deputy Speaker Jesus Crispin Remulla
  • Former Senator Francisco Tatad

 

RTD 2 will bring in the perspectives of academics and scholars, and;

The RTD 2 was held on 11 September 2014, Thursday, from 1:30-5:00 in the afternoon.

Invited Resource Persons:

  • House of Representatives Secretary General Marilyn Barua-Yap
  • Executive Director Ronald U. Mendoza – Asian Institute of Management
  • Prof. Pacifico A. Agabin – UP Diliman College of Law
  • Dante B. Gatmaytan – Associate Professor UP College of Law

 

RTD 3 will serve as a platform for business, media, civil society organizations, and other stakeholders to share their views on how to strengthen institutions of policy making.

The RTD 3 was held on 18 September 2014, Thursday, from 1:30-5:00 in the afternoon.

Invited Resource Persons:

  • Nepomuceno A. Malaluan – Center for Media and Freedom Responsibility
  • Prof. Raul C. Pangalangan – UP Diliman College of Law
  • Atty. Simeon Marcelo – Former Ombudsman
  • Antonio Cruz – Social Media Strategist

 

2nd Call for Proposals on Policy Research

Dr. Perry Ong, Dr. Josef Yap, Dr. Temy Rivera

Dr.Perry Ong, Dr.Josef Yap & Dr. Temy Rivera

 

UPCIDS is now accepting capsule proposals on policy research on any of the 4E framework of CIDS. Click here.

This call for proposals is open to all faculty-researchers from UP Visayas and Mindanao campuses who participated in the 2nd workshop on “Building Capacity To Do Policy Research” held last July 23, 2013 at UP Cebu. The workshop which feature a panel of experts and research fellows of CIDS and PIDS was conducted to develop capacity to do policy researches among young faculty-researchers of UP.

The deadline of submission is on July 31, 2013 (Wed).

Download Capsule Proposal Format for Policy Research 

The 2nd “Building Capacity To Do Policy Research” Workshop

The 2nd workshop on “Building Capacity To Do Policy Research” , which will involve faculty-researchers from UP Visayas and Mindanao campuses, is scheduled on 23 July 2013, from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM, at the University of the Philippines Cebu College.

A Workshop on the Wildlife Resources Conservation and Protection Act of 2001 (RA9147) and the Nagoya Protocol

Then and now, a great number of researches of the faculty and REPS of the University of the Philippines deal with our biological diversity.  Such researches are covered by Republic Act 9147 otherwise known as the Wildlife Resources Conservation and Protection Act of 2001 as well as guidelines ensuing from this act.  Most researchers however are not clear about the implications on their research of provisions of the Act and the other pertinent guidelines.  Thus, UP CIDS is organizing a workshop to bring UP researchers, DENR, DA, DOST and other stakeholders together to discuss how researches can be facilitated while complying with the provisions of RA 9147. There will also be discussions on the implications to researches of the recently concluded multilateral agreement called the Nagoya Protocol.

 

The workshop is scheduled on 18-19 July 2013, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm at CIDS, G/F Bahay ng Alumni, Magsaysay Ave., UP Diliman.
Interested faculty-researchers of UP is invited to participate on this workshop.

 

For additional information and pre-registration, kindly contact Rose or Grace at 929 3540 or email [email protected].

UP TWSC will hold public lecture entitled “Autonomy and Expectations”

Source: twsc.upd.edu.ph

The University of the Philippines Third World Studies Center (TWSC), co-sponsored by CIDS, will hold a public lecture of Prof. Leland Dela Cruz titled “Autonomy and Expectations: A Public Lecture on The Evolution of University Social Research Centers” on Tuesday 25 June 2013 from 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm at the TWSC Conference Area, Lower Ground Floor, Palma Hall, UP Diliman, Quezon City

Public Lecture Abstract

Contact Details:

Phones: +63 2 981 8500
ext. 2442 (Administrative Staff)
2488 (Research Staff)
Telefax: +63 2 920 5428
Mobile: +63 926 710 2926
Email: [email protected]
Blog: http://uptwsc.blogspot.com/

Call for Proposals on Policy Research

The workshop on “Building Capacity To Do Policy Research” was held at CIDS on May 17, 2013 to develop the capacity to do policy researches among young faculty-researchers of UP and to write policy papers for publication. Faculties from UP Manila, Diliman, Baguio, Los Baños, and Open University attended the event.

The presentations featured four panels of experts from different academic disciplines. The panel consisted of Commissioner Cynthia Bautista of CHED, President Josef Yap of PIDS and UP professors, Dr. Perry Ong of Institute of Biology and Dr. Temario Rivera of Department of Political Science.

Policy research in Social Sciences, Education & Arts, Natural Sciences, and Economics were among the topics. Presenters discussed the issues and limitations in doing policy research. They noted that “without solid basic research, policy research will be impossible to do”. The important elements in writing and publishing policy research were also addressed.

At the end of the presentations, the participants partook in a workshop to discuss their expertise and ideas in doing research, in which they will submit a capsule proposal on a policy research they wish to undertake given that it must be a topic on any of the 4E framework of UP CIDS. (Click this link)

The deadline of submission is on May 31, 2013 (Friday).

Download Capsule Proposal Format for Policy Research (PDF Format)

A Workshop on “Building Capacity To Do Policy Research”

UP CIDS will be conducting a workshop on May 17, 2013 from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM at UP CIDS office, G/F Ang Bahay ng Alumni, Magsaysay Ave., UP Diliman.

This activity aims to develop the capacity to do policy researches. The workshop will feature a panel of experts and research fellows of UP CIDS and PIDS, including the writing of policy papers for publication.  At the end of the workshop, the participants will be asked to submit a capsule proposal on a policy research they wish to undertake. The research must be a topic on any of the 4E framework of UP CIDS (Click this link).

The workshop is open to young faculty-researchers of UP, from Assistant to Associate Professor. While there will be no registration fee, slots are limited to 40 participants only. Pre-registration is required. Please wait for a notification that will be sent to your email and to your CU for your confirmed slots.

Interested parties may confirm with Rose via phone 929-3540 or e-mail [email protected].

 

UP researchers visits PCA – Zamboanga Research Center Site

As a result of the MoU signing between UP and DA-PCA, six UP scientists and researchers conducted a study visit to PCA- Zamboanga Research Center last March 08, 2013.This visit enabled UP researchers to get better knowledge and understanding of the PCA’s activities and researches on coconut industry with a view to plan further cooperation between UP and PCA in terms of research studies.

More Photos on the PCA-ZRC visit in our facebook page.

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CIDS to hold biodiversity workshop

The Center for Integrative and Development Studies (CIDS) will hold the lecture series-workshop “Integrating Biodiversity Research, Education, Public Engagement and Conservation from November 12 to 16 at the National Institute of Physics.

Organized by the California Academy of Sciences and the UP System, the 4-day activity provides “an excellent learning opportunity for educators, policy makers, biologists and taxonomists, in particular, as well as a venue for the exchange of ideas among a highly interdisciplinary group of scientists and users of our biodiversity.” ...view full post>> 

Source: UPD Inside News – The Diliman UP Date Online

PIDS Research Fair

CIDS will be participating on the 35th Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS) Anniversary in celebration of the 10th Development Policy Research Month this coming September 24-26 2012.

http://dprm.pids.gov.ph/?p=512

Source: www.pids.gov.ph


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The Framework for UP CIDS Researches

UP-CIDS SPANS THE SPECTRUM of perspectives, methodologies, and ideologies as it conducts basic and policy oriented research. These researches are guided by a conceptual framework with a view to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDG)

cidsprogram

CIDS Framework: Achieving the MDGs


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Call for Proposals!

The UP President Edgardo J. Angara Fellowship (UPPEJA) Committee is now ready to accept proposals.

Download UPPEJA Fellowship application form below 

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