Teacher Education in the Philippines: Are We Meeting the Demand for Quality?

Author

Ian Nicole Generalao, Geoffrey Ducanes, Karol Mark Yee, and Clarissa C. David

DOI

doi.org/10.54096/IENE4805

Abstract

The Philippines’ dismal performance in recent international assessments (e.g., PISA in 2018; TIMSS and SEA-PLM in 2019) evince that a learning crisis persists and remains a formidable challenge for the country. This is despite the many educational reforms undertaken in recent years, such as resolving the decades-long backlog in school infrastructure, expanding access to early childhood education, upgrading teacher salaries, and enhancing the basic education curriculum. Although there is a myriad of factors that contribute to poor learner outcomes, there is a consensus in literature regarding the central role played by the teacher in these dynamics. This has motivated the researchers’ study of teacher education programs in higher education institutions (HEIs), particularly in their capacity to effectively prepare pre-service teachers for the profession. To fully understand this phenomenon, the researchers explored the profile of teacher education programs in the country in the past decade, and used multiple regression analysis to examine the relationship between performance in the Licensure Exam for Teachers (LET) and the characteristics of the HEI attended (e.g., student-to-faculty ratio, HEI type, location, size, year established). It was found that between 2010 to 2016, an outsized proportion of poor quality were in Mindanao, particularly in BARMM and Region 12. Not coincidentally, these are the same regions where not a single institution has been able to hurdle CHED requirements to become a Center of Excellence (COE) in Teacher Education. Further analysis shows that attending programs in small HEIs is associated with a 14 to 17 percentage point disadvantage in the LET, relative to large institutions. Meanwhile, SUCs are seen to perform better in LET Elementary, whereas private HEIs and LUCs perform slightly better in LET Secondary. The proponents of this study put forward policy recommendations aimed at curbing the prevalence of non-performing HEIs, providing incentives for quality among TEIs, and strengthening oversight and coordination of the space.

Keyboards
Member Discipline Institutional Affiliation
Maria Ela L. Atienza, Ph.D. Political Science University of the Philippines Diliman
Aileen S.P. Baviera, Ph.D. Asian Studies University of the Philippines Diliman
Allan B.I. Bernardo, Ph.D. Psychology University of Macau
Marie Therese A.P. Bustos,
Ph.D.
Education University of the Philippines Diliman
Dominique Caouette, Ph.D. Political Science University of Montreal
Miriam Coronel-Ferrer Political Science University of the Philippines Diliman
Vedi R. Hadiz, Ph.D. Political Science University of Melbourne
Tim Harper, Ph.D. History Cambridge University
Caroline S. Hau, Ph.D. Cultural and Literary Studies Kyoto University
Kevin Hewison, Ph.D. Political Science University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Paul D. Hutchcroft, Ph.D. Political Science Australian National University
Yutaka Katayama, Ph.D. Political Science Kobe University
Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet, Ph.D. Political Science Australian National University
Lau Kin Chi, Ph.D. Cultural Studies Lingnan University
Herman Joseph S. Kraft Political Science University of the Philippines Diliman
Joseph Anthony Y. Lim, Ph.D. Economics Ateneo de Manila University
Manuel F. Montes, Ph.D. Economics The South Center, Geneva
Macrina A. Morados Islamic Studies University of the Philippines Diliman
Fidel R. Nemenzo, D.Sc. Mathematics University of the Philippines Diliman
Dina Joana S. Ocampo, Ph.D. Education University of the Philippines Diliman
Maureen C. Pagaduan Community Development University of the Philippines Diliman
Annette O. Pelkmans-Balaoing, Ph.D. Economics Erasmus University Rotterdam
Antoinette R. Raquiza, Ph.D. Political Economy University of the Philippines Diliman
Takashi Shiraishi, Ph.D. History Kyoto University
John T. Sidel. Ph.D. Political Science London School of Economics
Guillermo Q. Tabios, III, Ph.D. Civil Engineering University of the Philippines Diliman
Eduardo C. Tadem, Ph.D. Asian Studies University of the Philippines Diliman
Mark R. Thompson, Ph.D. Political Science City University of Hong Kong
Jorge V. Tigno, DPA Political Science University of the Philippines Diliman
Olle Törnquist, Ph.D. Political Science University of Oslo
Marie Aubrey J. Villaceran, Ph.D. English Studies University of the Philippines Diliman

Recommended Citation

Chichago Style

Generelao, Ian Nicole, Geoffrey Ducanes, Karol Mark Yee, and Clarissa C. David. 2022. “Teacher Education in the Philippines: Are We Meeting the Demand for Quality?” Philippine Journal for Public Policy: Interdisciplinary Development Perspectives, 2022: 1–65.

American Psychological Association (APA) Style

Generelao, I. N., Ducanes, G., Yee, K. M., & David, C. C. (2022). Teacher education in the Philippines: Are we meeting the demand for quality? Philippine Journal for Public Policy: Interdisciplinary Development Perspectives, 2022: 1–65.

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